Wisconsin

States - Big Screen

The motto of Wisconsin is "Forward," and it's clear to see that things are moving forward on Employment First initiatives that are empowering individuals with disabilities to find success in the careers they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Wisconsin’sVR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
5,813,568
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
322,172
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
135,105
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0%
Change from
2017 to 2018
41.94%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.22%
Change from
2017 to 2018
82.82%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 5,778,709 5,795,483 5,813,568
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 344,120 339,267 322,172
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 143,726 142,285 135,105
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,612,737 2,626,044 2,639,521
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.77% 41.94% 41.94%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.20% 82.64% 82.82%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.10% 3.30% 3.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.50% 19.80% 18.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.70% 10.20% 10.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 341,711 338,197 329,596
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 344,422 339,752 337,608
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 589,836 585,250 578,526
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 49,835 49,861 45,920
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 35,451 32,245 32,092
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,209 7,651 8,267
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,819 9,655 9,448
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 158
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 16,677 16,668 16,669
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 11,342 8,728 8,216

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 11,140 11,105 10,886
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.80% 9.80% 9.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 160,929 160,916 158,502

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 3,604 4,133 5,143
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,961 5,637 7,157
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 15,352 15,267 17,702
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.50% 27.10% 29.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.60% 3.90% 4.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.20% 2.80% 3.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 12.20% 14.10% 11.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 5.30% 4.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 864 1,140 1,461
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 752 816 1,070
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,126 4,065 3,866
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 977 1,534 1,515

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 17,223 15,934 16,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 106 100 118
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 70 77 87
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 66.00% 77.00% 74.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.22 1.33 1.51

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
8,374
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 192 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 617 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,506 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,476 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,029 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 553 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.90% 32.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8,850 8,545 8,582
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 238,092 240,149 238,790
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 439 340 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 632 485 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $23,873,000 $25,398,000 $25,579,423
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $48,800,000 $46,586,000 $44,051,379
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $82,849,000 $86,652,000 $88,228,569
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,102,000 $9,677,000 $10,384,821
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 19.00% 20.00% 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,110 3,288 3,275
Number of people served in facility based work. 7,243 7,083 6,733
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 8,170 8,471 8,637
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 55.80 56.90 58.49

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.22% 67.39% 68.94%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.16% 8.84% 8.48%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.50% 1.43% 1.44%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.83% 99.93% 99.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.44% 28.40% 27.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.39% 71.12% 68.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.05% 83.15% 81.95%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.95% 42.72% 40.45%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,759,088
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 269,729
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,118,183
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,387,912
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 410
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 862
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,272
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,894,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $16,572,273

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 4 2 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 62 67 59
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 5 4 2
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 71 73 61
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 5 3 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6,253 6,321 4,918
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 301 299 205
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6,559 6,623 5,123

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

SES does include use of the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery. (Page 165) Title I

Customized Employment services can be used if an individual has not been successful utilizing SES.SES in Wisconsin utilize a consumer centered resource team. This team includes the DVR consumer, DVR staff, the Supported Employment service provider, the special education or other teacher, long-term support career planner, the guardian or anyone else the consumer chooses to invite. (Page 169) Title I

Changes to SES are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long-term care system and DVR's service provider network.

The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and several internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2016, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys regarding service capacity for SES services. In addition, focus groups were conducted with WRC of providers to discuss SES services and barriers in providing services including expansion to underserved areas. (Page 206) Title IV

o Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long-term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. (Page 211) Title IV

o DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county-based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee-for-service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community-based SES and LTES in lieu of center-based extended employment. (Pages 212-213) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 3: Utilize evidence-based practices that advance the employment of individuals with the most significant disabilities needed additional supports. SES will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery. Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

DVR achieved this goal. Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long-term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. (Page 226) Title IV

501. DVR staff is also involved with the planning and provision of supported employment training including customized employment in collaboration with the Wisconsin PROMISE Grant. (Page 233) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~DVR developed an agreement with DHS, Division of Long Term Care with guidelines for making determinations of payment for service for common customers. The agreement is intended to provide clarification of funding responsibilities for adults seeking competitive employment who may also require short-term employment supports through DVR and long-term employment supports through the Family Care system. This agreement defines and guides practice and provides a structure to coordinate service planning, appropriately blend and braid funding and to resolve disputes. The agreement will be updated prior to the next state plan submission to reflect WIOA requirements. (Page 150) Title I

Programmatic Goal 6: DVR will collaborate with other partners, most importantly long-term care services, to provide a braided approach to working with individuals with the most significant disabilities needing additional employment supports.

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including IPS (via Medicaid waiver approved funds).The Division of Long Term Care within DHS uses a Managed Care approach to provide employment services to individuals with developmental and physical disabilities.

DVR conducts regular collaborative meetings and activity with sources of long-term support including managed care organizations, self-directed managed care and county programs to facilitate referrals, service coordination and increase outcomes. (Page 205) Title IV

o DVR will additionally work more closely with the long-term care community to assist co-enrolled adults who seek integrated work opportunities in the community. Braiding services and offering an array of funded services will help disabled individuals achieve successful outcomes, providing immense opportunities for both the long-term care and DVR consumers. DVR has established an on-going and collaborative relationship with various groups to facilitate communication and coordination of services to mutual consumers. This collaboration has included cross-training, local outreach, common policy instruction. DVR has also implemented enhanced data collection to better track outcomes and successful closure information within the DVR case management system. (Page 213) Title IV

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. The TAG is the tool that is used to help make those braided funding decisions. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services. Staff of all three potential funding sources (DVR, DPI and DHS) are trained in the use of this decision-making process outlined in the TAG. (Page 218) Title IV.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Wisconsin's participation in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) has positioned the state well for continued physical and programmatic compliance. As a "Round Two" DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed a 3-year, $2,330,000 demonstration project, which was designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource support improved the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6-month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post-DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin by:
• Ensuring accessibility in all 11 WDAs 
   o Pilot areas:
        WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues.
   o Control areas:
        All five control WDAs were offered the opportunity for ADA inspections, which resulted in the completion of eight inspections in three WDAs;
        All five control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI, which resulted in nine Job Centers in four WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, specialized keyboards, etc. 
   o All WDAs:
         49 job centers have identical set up of new computers, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology (AT) equipment. (Pages 81-82) Title I

The cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include:
• 1,637 job center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals' external to the Job Centers;
• 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration's Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks; 
• 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period; 
• 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 82) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~DVR is currently focusing on programs that expand financial literacy, job development, youth services, and underserved tribal populations. Each program was created to address specific local needs in respective WDAs. Topics include: banking basics, car purchases, budgeting, understanding credit, employment barriers, online applications, social skills, temporary work experiences, self-advocacy, and obtaining gainful employment. Throughout the year, quarterly reports are due to DVR for review of progress and scope. It is anticipated for these services to transition from I & E funding to fee-for-service agreements upon successful effective completion. DVR has implemented services to potentially eligible around the state. (Page 215) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~DVR renewed non-financial MOU with the University of Wisconsin System and the Wisconsin Technical College System Board. The purpose of the MOU is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of DVR and the Institution of Higher Education in fostering a seamless delivery system supporting the DVR IPE and common customers engaged in training at a post-secondary institution as a means to achieve their employment goal. Included in the MOU is an agreement to coordinate financial aid information so that the DVR consumers can make maximum effort to secure financial aid grants.

Each MOU described above is published on the DVR public website. 

o UW System MOU: https://dwd.wisconsin.gov/dvr/pdf_files/uw_system_mou.pdf 
o Wisconsin Technical College System MOU: https://dwd.wisconsin.gov/dvr/pdf_files/wtcs_mou.pdf   (Page 151) Title IV

DVR is primarily responsible for assuring that services within the Scope of VR Services (34 CFR 361.48) are available to assist eligible individuals with an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in achieving their employment goals.

As needed to assure the timely and continuous provision of IPE services, the agency's financial priority is to expend Title I-B operational and discretionary case aid funds to assure the timely and continuous availability and delivery of services to these individuals over the anticipated term of their service plans. DVR will maintain an IPE obligation reserve to secure the continuous and timely provision of employment plan services. The case aids budget will be dedicated to the continuous and timely support of IPE services and to develop and activate employment plans for eligible individuals with most significant and significant disabilities in a timely manner from the DVR waitlist. (Page 154) Title I

Per DVR policy students with disabilities are recommended to apply for DVR services at least two years prior to graduation. The plan for employment should be developed as soon as possible, but the time shall not exceed 90 days after eligibility for DVR services is determined. DVR staff will use rapid engagement and motivational interviewing techniques when working with this population.

DVR, in collaboration with the local education agency, will provide services to assist the student in developing and successfully achieving their IPE goal. (Page 157) Title I

The DVR Policy Manual states “Transition: For high school students who are eligible for development of a plan for employment, the plan for employment will be completed prior to leaving high school”.

It is understood by all DVR staff working with transition age students that their responsibility is to coordinate with the school’s efforts to engage the student in activities that will allow development of an IPE before the student leaves high school.

The TAG, which is an integral part of the Interagency Agreement, calls for referral of students no later than two years prior to exit from school. This allows time for the necessary career exploration, job shadows, and integrated work experiences leading to the development of an IPE prior to matriculation. DVR assures that the individualized plan for employment is also coordinated with the employment goal in the school’s individualized educational plan and, where appropriate, the individualized service plans of the long-term care service providers. (Page 158) Title I

4.To provide clarification of roles of stakeholders within each respective department regarding individuals with disabilities who have identified support needs associated with employment and independent living, so that individuals and their families may regard such efforts to be as seamless, non-duplicative, and as transparent as possible.

The Interagency Agreement and the TAG describe the role of DVR including the responsibility to provide consultation and technical assistance, referred to as Employment Planning Consultation. The agreement addresses the need for DVR liaisons and staff to provide school districts that have transition students who have not yet applied for VR services with assistance,
strategies and creative ideas for identifying the students’ post-school employment goals, needs for services, and concerns to be addressed in achieving those goals.

DVR staff attends IEP meetings, with consent from the student and family to assist those students, parents and teachers in the development of the transition portion of the IEP. DVR staff can provide information the types of employment services we offer. This provides the opportunity for the IEP to be developed in collaboration and coordination with their IPE. Having a consisted employment goal and coordinated services in the IEP and IPE is important to ensure the student receives the most appropriate and valuable services from both DVR and the LEA. DVR is also available to provide information and technical assistance on transition services to teachers, parents, and other organizations and councils.

As outlined in the TAG and the DVR Policy the development of the plan for employment for students who are eligible for plan development, is to occur prior to the student leaving school. DVR staff and educators are encouraged to coordinate the provision of services and transition activities for students who are eligible for both IEP and an IPE services to assist them in transitioning from school to work. (Pages 159-160) Title I

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services.

The following are general guidelines to help understand how decisions can be made under the DVR/DPI/DHS interagency agreement.
Test 1 - Will the service help to achieve the educational goal of the IEP? If yes, the school is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 2 - Will the service help to achieve the employment goal of the IPE? If yes, DVR is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 3 - If the same service appears on both the IEP and IPE, the school and DVR are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement (conflicts between schools and DVR are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement). (Page 162) Title IV

The current average caseload of total individuals served with an active IPE in Wisconsin is 15,000 individuals. DVR is projecting a possible increase of consumers needing SES. This increase is due to the impact of the provisions in WIOA to serve youth and students and the annual requirement for the DSU to establish contact with workers in a 14 (c) environment. (Page 165) Title IV

DVR has been a partner in efforts to establish the use of an Academic and Career plan for all student in Wisconsin schools including the use of this plan in informing IEP's and IPE's. Through the partnerships, students with the most significant disabilities are participating in competitive, integrated work-related activities will still in high school. This has significantly increased the interest in supported employment services for youth in Wisconsin. Some tools that DVR has developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT -   agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job, job shadows, business tours, job coaching, internship and temporary work, coordinated soft skill training and other employer training with DPI and local school districts while youth are still in high school Once a specific IPE job goal is developed and the youth has obtained employment consistent with the job goal, supported employment services to provide ongoing support, including extended services if needed, will be provided. (Pages 167-168) Title IV

Supported Employment is widely available and is always an available service and outcome for youth. Due to the increased availability of work based learning, and the federally required diversion from 14 (c) employment and paid work options for youth it is expected that there will be many more youth needing SES in Wisconsin. For youth that are interested in supported employment, the Career Profile is provided as part of the comprehensive assessment. The purpose of the career profile is to get information from the consumer and others on the support team. This information will be gathered during interviews. The information for the career profile will be used to help in choosing job or career goal, for job searching and for figuring out how to support the youth on the job. (Page 168) Title IV

(9) Services provided under an IPE will be coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other Federal or State programs;

DVR has a policy in place for the coordination of IEP's and IPE's prior to graduation and prior to that when necessary. In the past, service and treatment plans with long-term care and mental health were coordinated and services identified and funding responsibilities determined. (Page 170) Title IV

DVR has identified 35,000 students in the Wisconsin public school systems that are eligible for VR services. Additionally, through the Promise Grant, we know that over 6,000 youth between the ages of 14-16 are receiving SSI and may or may not have an active IEP. Wisconsin, through its Promise Grant and supported employment experience, believes that targeting outreach to SSI and individuals with the most significant disabilities will allow for strategic niche for needed VR services and collaboration with the schools. DVR will continue to collaborate through the TAG and the active coordination of services with education and long-term care services. DVR continues to coordinate transition services via IEP meetings, transition fairs, collaboration with transition coordinators, and involvement in school/work-related activities under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Page 197) Title IV

DVR is shifting its focus to a student, youth and supported employment model to ensure that the populations targeted for WIOA outreach have access to VR services. DVR has changed policies and fee schedules on transportation and existing business. In addition, DVR has implemented student work based learning technical specifications and fee schedules. (Page 215) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 1: DVR will transition to a youth-focused, most significantly disabled caseload to ensure that all individuals with disabilities who want to work have the opportunity to share their talents with the community and businesses.

DVR achieved this goal by ensuring that every high school in Wisconsin has a DVR liaison assigned and provides outreach to students with disabilities. DVR has a strong collaboration with the Department of Public Instruction and continues to implement the DVR/DPI/DHS Interagency agreement and Transition Action Guide to assist high school's students transition from school to work. DVR is committed to developing and implementing an eligible high school student’s IPE as early as possible during the transition from high school planning process. DVR will develop a student’s IPE prior to graduation. In accordance with the MOU between DVR and DPI, DVR will maintain contact with students and education agencies, attend transition meetings to provide transition planning consultation and technical assistance.

DVR has ensured it has made available Pre-ETS services to both eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities including developing new service technical specifications, such as its new Work Based Learning Services, to meet the service needs of students and youth with disabilities. DVR tracks the number of students it works with to help ensure we are having a youth-focus. (Pages 225-226) Title IV

The IPE for DVR consumers, who select competitive employment in an integrated setting but may require long term employment support, usually begins with an assessment called a career Profile to help determine the employment goal related to the consumer’s interests and strengths. The assessment process may include trial work or other employment explorations to help identify the extent of supports that may be necessary. If needed, the potential source(s) of funding for the long-term employment supports must also be identified. If the source of extended services cannot be identified at the time of implementation of the employment plan, the plan must at least identify the services, activities and/or progress measures designed to identify the nature, type, scope, requirements and source of extended services. The DVR identifies extended services from private nonprofit organization, employers, and other appropriate resources for an individual with a most significant disability transitioning from employment supports provided by the DVR. SES are provided only to those individuals with the most significant disabilities and who, as may be required, have an identified likely source of long term support. (Pages 233-234) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~DVR will continue to consider collaborative agreements with State Agency Departments to target and increase paid OJT internship opportunities for DVR job seekers in state positions.
This initiative is designed to access state limited term employment (LTE) positions to expand the number of state employment opportunities that contribute to the skills and work experience of persons with disabilities served by DVR. The goal of the OJT LTE paid internship is that upon successful completion, DVR sponsored intern will have valuable experience and references for their resume and will be prepared to compete for available LTE or permanent state agency positions. (Page 50) Title I

DVR has been a partner in efforts to establish the use of an Academic and Career plan for all student in Wisconsin schools including the use of this plan in informing IEP's and IPE's. Through the partnerships, students with the most significant disabilities are participating in competitive, integrated work-related activities will still in high school. This has significantly increased the interest in supported employment services for youth in Wisconsin. Some tools that DVR has developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT -   agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job, job shadows, business tours, job coaching, internship and temporary work, coordinated soft skill training and other employer training with DPI and local school districts while youth are still in high school Once a specific IPE job goal is developed and the youth has obtained employment consistent with the job goal, supported employment services to provide ongoing support, including extended services if needed, will be provided. (Pages 167-168) Title IV

Private-sector and state agency employers have benefited significantly from the following DVR OJT initiatives:
o Since Fiscal Year 2016, more than 800 OJT private-sector hires were supported by a 50% payroll cost subsidy for employers providing up to 90 days of OJT following a hire.
o In this same time period, DVR has invested nearly $750,00 for more than 104 DVR job-seekers participating in six-month OJT internships with 23 state agencies and other public entities. (Pages 171-172) Title IV

o DVR will continue to find partnership opportunities with DHS and DPI to continue outreach to youth with the most significant disabilities who may need supported employment. DVR will work with schools to offer work experiences while still in high school, ensuring a more hopeful employment path when reaching adulthood. DVR also developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job. (Page 212) Title IV 

DVR will continue to provide an OJT affirmative hiring initiative to assist employers with the initial cost of training a hired DVR job seeker. DVR area managers train CRP job-placement staff on the use of the OJT initiative. CRP job placement staff is encouraged to use the OJT initiative when they speak to employers about hiring DVR job seekers.  (Page 222) Title IV

o DVR continues to find partnership opportunities with DHS and DPI to continue outreach to transition students who may need supported employment. DVR will work with schools to offer work experiences to transition students while still in high school, ensuring a more hopeful employment path when reaching adulthood. DVR also developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job. DVR utilizes and trains staff to its Interagency agreement and Transition Action Guide between DVR/DPI/DHS to help students transition from school to work successfully. (Page 228) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~• 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration's Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks; (Page 82) Title I

The PROMISE initiative is a research and demonstration project that is intended to improve services for youth Social Security Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI. Wisconsin is one of six sites participating in the demonstration. (Page 175) Title IV

o DVR develop methods to increase consumer awareness of work incentives and Partnership Plus options and evaluate the impact on outcomes for SSI/DI recipients as the WRC recommended through their observation that employment outcomes for SSI/DI recipients appear to have lower earnings and hours than the general VR population.  (Page 192) Title IV

The PROMISE initiative is a research and demonstration project that is intended to improve services for youth Social Security SSI recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school, ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI. Wisconsin is one of six sites participating in the demonstration. (Page 218) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work.

DVR achieved this goal. DVR continues to encourage work incentive benefits counseling for consumers receiving benefits. DVR has technical specifications that are followed and used by our service providers for this service. In SFY 2017 over 3,000 consumers received work incentives benefits counseling. Our counselors also provide guidance and counseling to our consumers on the benefits of work. DVR continues to promote the “Partnership Plus” opportunities in the TTW program. DVR will share information with eligible Ticket holders on post-VR services and supports available through assignment of their Ticket to an approved employment network provider. (Pages 226-227) Title IV

In Wisconsin, supported employment is funded by primarily three sources; DVR Title I-B and long-term funding directed by DHS, Division of Long Term Care (DHS/DLTC) and Division of Care and Treatment Services (DCTS) Funds are managed locally by regional managed care organizations or a self-directed support system known as IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct)) and Managed Care Organizations (MCO's) Mental Health long term supports are managed locally by each county.

To a much lesser extent, Social Security Plans to Achieve Self-Support (PASS) plans, the TTW, natural supports and private party payments have been used to maintain a small number of individuals in long-term supported employment. DVR is promoting the TTW Partnership Plus to ticket holders which has the potential to increase funding for long-term supports. These financial resources enhance the quality, scope, and extent of services proposed under the Title VI plan. (Page 232) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~DVR supports a "dual-customer" approach to service delivery; serving both individuals with disabilities who want to work and the businesses who want to connect to this talent pool. DVR offers services to businesses that include outreach, follow along, and customized services geared toward meeting business needs. DVR Business Services are part of a collaborative workforce solutions system that also includes other state agencies and workforce partners. DVR Business Services team members participate in collaborative training with other business services professionals to ensure a shared understanding of the various programs and services available to business, share best practices, and work toward a consistent service delivery strategy statewide. Business services professionals representing various programs and services serve on a local business services team, and use a shared business relationship (account) management system to effectively communicative activities with businesses in real-time. (Page 30) Title I

DWD's mission: Advancing Wisconsin's economy and business climate by empowering and supporting the workforce. DVR believes this initiative, transitioning the DVR Business Service Consultant (BSC) project positions into permanent positions, best demonstrates a new customer for DVR that fits well with the department's priorities of meeting the workforce needs of Wisconsin's business. DVR fully embraces the dual customer role of serving the workforce needs of Wisconsin's business community while building the needed talent through our DVR job seeker clientele. DVR is the state's preferred talent portal and by having a closer relationship to our business customer, DVR has been able to exceed our employment goal since the BSCs have been part of the DVR service delivery model. (Page 171) Title IV

The BSCs serve to improve business outreach and retention, assisting DWD and DVR meet our state's draft performance measure of Employer Penetration and Retention Rate(s). This enables businesses in Wisconsin to learn about and receive business services DWD and partners can offer. The goal of new businesses receiving services from a DVR BSC is to encourage new business connections and repeat business customers. BSCs are available as technical advisors for: employers on ADA, accommodations and other disability services as described in WIOA; and for their employees developing disabilities throughout their tenure with an employer.

BSCs serve on regional Business Service Teams, coordinating business service(s) with WIOA partners as well as other partner agencies serving business and economic development. This has improved seamless business service delivery to businesses in Wisconsin.

BSCs are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the 7,000 job seekers on DVR caseloads match the skills that are needed by businesses. This allows DVR counselors to spend more time with job seekers who require intensive IPE development and career counseling. (Page 171) Title IV

DVR BSCs are part of the Business Service teams located in each of the 11 WDAs. Along with other workforce partners, the BSCs conduct outreach to businesses to assess needs and share the needs and job openings with all the workforce partners. Wisconsin workforce partners, through a DOL federal grant, developed a common data system that tracks all business contacts and provides all the workforce partners with a common platform of business leads. DVR staff play a significant role in sharing the business needs with other partners and, in turn, have access to other business leads developed by workforce partners. DVR uses JCW Business, along with DET and other partners to collaborative provide business services and dually report the pilot performance measures for WIOA. (Page 172) Title IV

Business Services Focused on Transition and Pre-ETS
Transition and has been a significant focus for DVR, including business services. Project Search Expansion has resulted in increased business connections and BSC outreach to Project Search sites and business partners. The Business Committees required of Project Search sites has further enhanced DVR's relationship with businesses and educating businesses in the value of hiring and retaining people with disabilities. Business Service Consultants are members of Project Search Business Committees and promote internship and hiring practices for students with disabilities.
Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) have expanded our connections with businesses interested in working with and recruiting students. DVR has developed Pre-ETS services that improve our connection with local workforce boards and business connections developed through WIOA partner efforts. DVR, via contracted service providers, have established fee-for-service Pre-ETS services, including job shadows. Job Shadows allow students with disabilities to explore different career opportunities and at the same time expose the business (that is being job shadowed) to future student interns and/or permanent employees. Paid Internships and Job Shadows promoted via business services and WIOA partners have facilitated student job shadows and internships that have resulted in a student permanently hired for his/her first job. (Page 173) Title IV

DVR Business Service Consultants are part of the Business Service teams located in each of the 11 WDAs. Along with other workforce partners, the BSCs conduct outreach to businesses and share the needs and job openings with all the workforce partners. DVR staffs play a significant role in sharing the business needs with other partners and, in turn, have access to other business leads developed by workforce partners. (Page 230) Title IV

An important outcome of listening to business needs includes the development of specialized training programs either with other workforce partners or solely developed with DVR consumers, helping DVR job seekers obtain the needed curriculum instruction, experience and recruitment assistance necessary to meet the talent needs of specific employers. (Page 231) Title IV

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~In 2015, an extensive effort was completed related to examining to the needs of individuals who may need supported employment. DVR examined data provided by DPI, data provided by the Equal Rights Division (administrator of one 14(c) program in Wisconsin), as well as other sources to determine the number of consumers that will potentially need SES required under WIOA. The potential number of students with IEP's needing services is identified at 35,000 and the number of individuals currently served under just one of the 14(c) available subminimum wage certificates is 6,500 individuals. The current average caseload of total individuals served with an active IPE in Wisconsin is 15,000 individuals. DVR is projecting a possible increase of consumers needing SES. This increase is due to the impact of the provisions in WIOA to serve youth and students and the annual requirement for the DSU to establish contact with workers in a 14 (c) environment. (Page 165) Title IV

DVR, working with DPI, DWD-Equal Rights Division who administers the subminimum wage licenses and reviewing federal reports has identified the following targeted opportunities for DVR outreach:
o In-school Youth: Approximately 35,000 students.  
o Subminimum Wage: 6,500 individuals.
o Subminimum Wage and Child Labor Permit (under 18 years): 1,000 youth.
o With this new targeted information, DVR will work with education and long-term care agencies to operationalize new federally mandated requirements to engage in direct outreach to these individuals.
o Individuals on OOS Waiting List - DVR has addressed the waitlist so that in FFY 2015 individuals with a most significant disability will continue to be immediately activated. As of PY 2018, both individuals with a most significant disability and individuals with a significant disability will continue to be immediately activated. DVR anticipates continuing to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities and significant disabilities in PY 2019, with a small amount of NSD in OOS Category Three. (Page 194) Title IV

.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The one-stop delivery system's compliance with Section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the ADA are ensured through the State of Wisconsin's Methods of Administration (MOA), submitted to the US DOL's Civil Rights Center (CRC). Compliance with these provisions are assured through the State's Nondiscrimination Plan, required in the revised Section 188 nondiscrimination and equal opportunity regulations 29 CFR part §38in effect as of January 3, 2017. (Page 80) Title IV

Local EO Officers are required to complete a Section 188 Disability Accessibility Checklist annually as well as conducting physical accessibility reviews of one-stop job centers and affiliate sites to ensure all facilities used in providing program services and activities are accessible to individuals with a disability. Local EO Officers have the option to use the "Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) for the Design, Construction and Alteration of Buildings" or the "ADA Checklist for Existing Facilities" produced by the New England ADA Center to conduct the physical accessibility reviews of facilities.

The DWD-DET EO Officer conducts annual on-site monitoring review visits to local Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) to determine the Board's compliance with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements. During the on-site reviews, the DWD-DET EO Officer meets with the local EO Officer to review all areas of compliance in the local WDB WIOA programs and activities. Walk-through inspections were conducted during the review to confirm comprehensive and affiliate job center sites are physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities. (Page 81) Title I

Vets

Wisconsin's veteran population is a recognized priority in the provision of workforce development services. The state has a proud tradition of effectively transitioning its returning military professionals to civilian employment. There are more than 150,000 veterans of working age (between 18 and 64) in Wisconsin, representing another vital potential workforce resource. The state's age 18-64 veteran population has a labor force participation rate that is roughly the same as the state as a whole (1.7% smaller). The unemployment rate of veterans is lower than that of the overall population (3.4% compared to 4.0% - 2016 American Community Survey). Twenty-eight percent of veterans experience some type of disability, a rate that is more than twice that of the nonveteran population. (Page 21-22) Title I

A strength that the state of Wisconsin uses is the Job Center of Wisconsin (JCW) website which has been enhanced to include matching potential employees to employer job openings. An initiative to hire Veterans has also been implemented using WiscJobsForVets - an initiative to assist Veterans with their work search. (Page 28) Title I

DWD's DET, Office of Veterans Employment Services (OVES) is funded by the DOL Veterans and Training Services, Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG). During Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, OVES will have 41 staff funded by the JVSG grant. DET manages the JVSG from Central Office in Madison where one Director is housed. This individual provides overall guidance, direction, and oversight and reports to Division Leadership. Three JVSG funded supervisors are stationed within three regions of the state and provide day to day supervision of Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) staff. All DVOP or LVER staff are integrated within job centers throughout the state. OVES management staff ensure all LVER and DVOP staff possess knowledge of requirements specified by Title U.S.C. Chapter 31 requirements and guidance provided through DOL Veteran Program letters.

LVERs are fully integrated within the business service teams and conduct employer outreach as members of that team. The sole function of the LVER is business services and interaction with employers. DVOPs are housed at job centers and provide intensive service for veterans that are identified to have a significant barrier to employment (SBE). A pre-screen form is used to determine if veterans meet the definition of a veteran with SBE. Veterans that are determined to be SBE are referred to DVOP staff or other career planners within the job centers. DVOPs provide the intensive services necessary and use a case managed approach to assist veterans with their employment needs. In addition to providing intensive services to SBE veterans that visit the job center, DVOPs conduct outreach to find SBE veterans. DVOPs also provide intensive services for veterans that receive education training funded by the Veterans Administration Chapter 31 program. OVES has a DVOP staff that is an Intensive Service Coordinator. This staff person is located at the Milwaukee Veterans Administration Regional Office and coordinates referrals of Chapter 31 veterans to DVOP and tracks services provided. (Page 30-31) Title I

Veterans requesting employment services complete a pre-screen form that determines if they meet the DOL definition for veteran with a SBE. Any veteran that meets that definition is referred to a DVOP or a job center career planner who will provide intensive services. These services include a comprehensive assessment, and an individualized employment plan. OVES staff work with partner agencies and programs to assure that priority of service is provided to veterans. Working closely with partner agencies assures that there is not duplication of services and that veterans receive all services that they are eligible and qualified to receive. The OVES LVERs are also integrated within the Job Centers and serve as members of the local business services team. LVERs are capacity builders that work with local area employers and community organizations. LVERs promote what veterans bring to the workforce and assist employers by connecting them to qualified veterans. LVERs serve as active participants in each WDA on the business service teams. The OVES' LVER and DVOP staff is integrated within the Job Centers of each of the 11 WDAs. (Page 49) Title I

INTERAGENCY MOU WITH DVR, THE OFFICE OF VETERAN EMPLOYMENT SERVICES WITHIN DWD'S DIVISION OF EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING AND THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF VETERAN'S AFFAIRS (MILWAUKEE REGIONAL OFFICE) The purpose of the MOU is to ensure seamless, coordinated, and effective VR services to Wisconsin's Veterans with disabilities by improving cooperation and collaboration among the three agencies, avoiding duplication of services, improving inter- agency communication and establishing staff cross-training opportunities. (Page 151) Title IV

Two initiatives were included in the Wisconsin Blueprint for Prosperity that will allow DVR to expand place and train opportunities for job seekers with disabilities and Wisconsin businesses. Training Workers with Disabilities Grants, part of the Wisconsin Fast Forward grant initiative, awarded funding to businesses to develop training for high demand jobs in their industries, and to target job seekers with disabilities, including veterans with service-related disabilities, in their recruitment and hiring. (Page 172) Title IV 

Through DWDs statewide and local MOUs with the One-Stop Partners and Job Center network and DVR Workforce Investment Board MOUs, the requirements of 34 CFR Part 361.23(b) are satisfied. DVR also has an agreement with DOL funded Veterans services program to coordinate services for common customers and to deliver quality services for disabled veterans. (Page 223) Title IV

The State of Wisconsin OVES provides services to eligible veterans through a statewide network of DVOP and LVER staff. These services are available in one-stop centers, online, and in various outreach locations. OVES staff work with partner agencies and programs to assure that priority of service is provided to veterans. Working closely with partner agencies assures that there is not duplication of services and that veterans receive all services that they are eligible and qualified to receive. LVERs are members of the local business services team. LVERs also work with employers so that veterans become employed. (Page 249) Title IV

THE DVOP DUTIES, TO THE CASE MANAGED POPULATIONS SERVED, INCLUDE:

o Document and record all activity using the State of Wisconsin approved computer-based case management system. Paper case management folders are used for documents such as DD214s, certifications and Chapter 31 related information.

o Comprehensive assessment to identify barriers, education and skill levels.

o Develop an IEP with the client to identify the strategies to overcome barriers and to find employment. Conduct follow-up to determine progress in achieving employment and adjust the IEP as needed.

o As appropriate, make referrals to other agencies, supportive services, counseling, testing or job search workshops. o Assist in employment seeking activities through preparation of resumes, cover letters and application forms; instruct in use of internet and/or JCW, and access to other materials and information, such as labor market analysis.

o Develop strong linkages with partner agencies to assure that there is an agreed understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the DVOP and partner staff in providing services to veterans.

o Coordinate with LVERs to refer veterans to job openings (Page 250) Title IV

OVES LVER and DVOP staff are located in the one-stop job center/career center network throughout the state of Wisconsin. LVERs are participating members of the job center business service teams. DVOPs partner with WIOA, WP, State VR staff, and other center based partner agencies, to develop employment plans and return veterans to self-sufficiency. Veteran service staff also partner with numerous non-job center based service providers. LVER staff partner with DVA, and the Wisconsin Employment Resource Connection. This partnership provides information on employment and training to active National Guard and National Guard and Reserve units. (Page 251) Title IV

Mental Health

~~DVR has identified sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children's waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment, including natural supports. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long-term support. (Page 169) Title I

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services.

The following are general guidelines to help understand how decisions can be made under the DVR/ DPI/DHS interagency agreement.

Test 1 - Will the service help to achieve the educational goal of the IEP? If yes, the school is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 2 - Will the service help to achieve the employment goal of the IPE? If yes, DVR is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 3 - If the same service appears on both the IEP and IPE, the school and DVR are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement (conflicts between schools and DVR are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement).
Test 4 - If the student is over 18 and eligible for Medicaid long-term care services and supports, and chooses to enroll in a Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health program, the three agencies are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement to determine resources for each individual’s situation. (Conflicts between agencies are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement. (Page 174) Title IV

DVR updated the interagency agreement with the state’s DPI in December of 2010. The agreement also includes DHS, Division of Long Term Care, Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, and Division of Public Health. This agreement describes the roles and responsibilities of the tri-agency state partnership which includes DVR, DPI, and DHS with respect to supports and services to youth-in-transition from high school and adults with disabilities who have an expectation for integrated competitive employment.

DVR has worked with DPI to update this agreement to revise and align with transition-related requirements with the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA. Currently, DVR is awaiting the SEA review and approval to complete final signature updating our agreement from 2010. We expect the agreement will be finalized in calendar year 2018. Once the agreement is assigned and in effect, the agreement is valid beginning on the date of signatures and will continue until it is replaced by a new agreement, terminated upon mutual agreement, or requested in writing by either party. (Page 187) Title IV

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including IPS (via Medicaid waiver approved funds) (Page 205) Title IV

DVR entered into an agreement with DHS to pilot a new comprehensive approach for the provision of supported employment to individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness called IPS. The Wisconsin IPS system change grant partnership with Dartmouth College Community Mental Health Program provides funds for mental health care employment service expansion and technical assistance. As part of the 3-year initiative, DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population. (Page 224) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
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Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 05/01/2020

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR within 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Executive Order 59 Relating to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in State Government - 11/12/2019

“WHEREAS, in Executive Order # 1, I charged the executive branch with developing policies and practices aimed at preventing discrimination, sexual harassment, or harassment of any individual on the basis of age, race, religion, ethnicity, disability, sex, physical condition, developmental disability, military or veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, marital or familial status, genetic information, or political affiliation; and

WHEREAS, equity and inclusion shall be the guiding principles and core values for every state workplace, program, activity, service, contract, and decision.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 10/01/2019

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence. All DVR services must be provided in competitive wage and integrated settings.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind”—rural and urban residents; ethnic or racial minorities; young adults; hourly and variable/seasonal-wage workers; those unaware of or without sufficient coverage options; retail workers; those re-entering from previous incarceration; and self employed individuals.. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Northwest Wisconsin Concentrated Economic Program, Inc. (NWCEP), African-American Men’s Health Education Center, Centro Hispano, Foundation for Black Women’s Wellness.  They will partner with Rapid Response Team, Transitional jobs program, VITA sites, Centro Hispano, Local barber shops, Black Women's Wellness Coalition, Boys and Girls Club, and Wisconsin Job Centers  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:llison EspesethPhone: (608) 890-4784Email: aehales@wisc.edu

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Children's Long-Term Support Waiver Program Amendment Number:WI.0414.R03.02 - 07/01/2019

~~“Per the terms of a corrective action plan (CAP) required by CMS, Wisconsin has developed a uniform statewide rate-setting methodology for most CLTS waiver services. The following waiver services are subject to a statewide rate schedule:•     Adult family home•     Child care•     Community integration services•     Counseling and therapeutic services•     Daily living skills training•     Day services•     Financial management services•     Mentoring•     Nursing services•     Respite•     Support and service coordination•     Supported employment•     Supportive home care•     Transportation” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DPI distributes $1.9 billion to Wisconsin schools - 06/17/2019

~~“The department used $2.3 million in flexible federal funds to bolster $9.4 million in state allocations for this aid program. In addition, Special Education Transition Incentive Grants totaling $3.0 million went to 360 school districts and independent charter schools, in proportion to the number of their graduates with disabilities who were in successful employment or education one year after graduation. Finally, the department sent $1.8 million in Supplemental Special Education Aid to 11 small school districts where special education costs were high relative to district revenue.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Long Term Care Functional Screen Instructions - 06/03/2019

~~“For an individual who is employed, the screener is asked to select the setting or settings where the person works. If the person is working in a facility-based setting, the screener must ask if the person is interested in working in the community.  When making a selection for an employment setting, screeners should ask questions to help the person articulate their preferences. While the person's preference may be difficult to ascertain, screeners are to use their best professional judgment to select the most accurate answer.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Fiscal Practices Manual with Training Activities - 06/01/2019

~~DVR fee schedule rates of payment are determined based upon a competitive pricing analysis and an analysis of DVR costs for these services over aperiod of time not less than one year, but no more than two years. As appropriate, DVR will set rates based upon approved state, county, or federal rates for the same purchased services. If this process is used, it will be specified in the fee schedule services provided under these agreements include:• Customized Employment• Individual Placement and Support (IPS)• Internship/Temporary Work• Job Preparation and Development including Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), JobDevelopment Hire, and Job Retention• Job Shadow• Skills to Pay the Bills• Student Work Based Learning (Pre-ETS)• Supported Employment • Systematic Instruction (Other Than Supported Employment)• Vocational Evaluation• Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI)• Work Incentive Benefits Analysis 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Mental Health: Healthy Living - 05/31/2019

~~“We are working to reduce the impact of mental illnesses on individuals and communities.Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.Positive mental health allows people to:• Realize their full potential• Cope with the stresses of life• Work productively• Make meaningful contributions to their communities”

This page has links to programs that can assist persons with mental health conditions

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration - 05/16/2019

~~“Wisconsin received a federal award for a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration. The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

This page has links to information on the program

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

2017 WISCONSIN ACT 323 - 04/17/2018

~~“COACHING PROGRAM ESTABLISHED.   2017 WISCONSIN ACT 323: AN ACT to amend 20.438 (1) (a); and to create 46.2898 of the statutes; relating to: employment of individuals withdisabilities enrolled in long−term care programs and making an appropriation.  More information about the legislation concerning a model of coaching businesses in the hiring  and  employment  of  individuals  with  disabilities and its features can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Wisconsin Act 178: Employment First Bill - 03/29/2018

“An Act to create 47.05 of the statutes; relating to: competitive integrated employment of persons with a disability and granting rule-making authority.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WI Statutes: Vocational Rehabilitation; Specialized Programs for Persons with Disabilities - 08/26/2015

This WI statute defines persons with disabilities and explains Vocational Rehabilitation and “special programs for persons with disabilities.” It states that the State will, “Make vocational rehabilitation services under this chapter available in every county to all persons with disabilities who are present in the state, regardless of residency,” and details the services that will be available to people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Wisconsin SB 21 (Act 55) - 07/12/2015

"Senate Bill 21 as 2015 Wisconsin Act 55 is approved and deposited in the office of the Secretary of State...The following is a brief summary of how this budget, including my vetoes, will continue to make Wisconsin more prosperous, more independent and more efficient...Newly establishes Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) accounts to empower the disabled community and their families to achieve greater independence and assist with various expenses."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Wisconsin Fair Employment Act

Wisconsin's Fair Employment Law gives civil rights protections to qualified persons with disabilities. The law applies to virtually all, private and public employers, regardless of the number of employees. Under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), disability discrimination is also prohibited for employers having 15 or more employees. Both laws are designed to ensure equal opportunity in all aspects of employment.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order 59 Relating to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in State Government - 11/12/2019

“WHEREAS, in Executive Order # 1, I charged the executive branch with developing policies and practices aimed at preventing discrimination, sexual harassment, or harassment of any individual on the basis of age, race, religion, ethnicity, disability, sex, physical condition, developmental disability, military or veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, marital or familial status, genetic information, or political affiliation; and

WHEREAS, equity and inclusion shall be the guiding principles and core values for every state workplace, program, activity, service, contract, and decision.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 05/01/2020

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR within 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Wisconsin Long Term Care Functional Screen Instructions - 06/03/2019

~~“For an individual who is employed, the screener is asked to select the setting or settings where the person works. If the person is working in a facility-based setting, the screener must ask if the person is interested in working in the community.  When making a selection for an employment setting, screeners should ask questions to help the person articulate their preferences. While the person's preference may be difficult to ascertain, screeners are to use their best professional judgment to select the most accurate answer.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Fiscal Practices Manual with Training Activities - 06/01/2019

~~DVR fee schedule rates of payment are determined based upon a competitive pricing analysis and an analysis of DVR costs for these services over aperiod of time not less than one year, but no more than two years. As appropriate, DVR will set rates based upon approved state, county, or federal rates for the same purchased services. If this process is used, it will be specified in the fee schedule services provided under these agreements include:• Customized Employment• Individual Placement and Support (IPS)• Internship/Temporary Work• Job Preparation and Development including Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), JobDevelopment Hire, and Job Retention• Job Shadow• Skills to Pay the Bills• Student Work Based Learning (Pre-ETS)• Supported Employment • Systematic Instruction (Other Than Supported Employment)• Vocational Evaluation• Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI)• Work Incentive Benefits Analysis 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Mental Health: Healthy Living - 05/31/2019

~~“We are working to reduce the impact of mental illnesses on individuals and communities.Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.Positive mental health allows people to:• Realize their full potential• Cope with the stresses of life• Work productively• Make meaningful contributions to their communities”

This page has links to programs that can assist persons with mental health conditions

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Employment First Conference 2019 - 05/15/2019

~~“Continuing On: Strengthening Partnerships for Community LifeThis year’s Employment First conference will provide an intensive, collaborative day of learning and problem solving for service providers, funders, families, and self-advocates who want to transform services to support people with disabilities to build full lives in their communities that include employment, volunteering, recreational, social and other community activities. More about the conference can be found by accessing the weblink.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Housing Assistance Programs - 05/06/2019

~~“This information is an overview of public programs that can offer assistance with renovating and weatherizing existing housing, filling energy needs and obtaining access to public housing and rent assistance.”

This page has links to information on accessibility and ADA compliance for buildings.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Sample IEP Forms Revision - 05/03/2019

~~“we recently released DPI Model Special Education Forms changes for the 2019-20 school year. Updated forms include substantive (district request, law changes, and/or eliminating duplicative information) and non-substantive changes (grammar, pronouns, and/or formatting). Substantive changes were made to the following forms:• R-1 (Referral for special education evaluation);• I-3 (IEP team meeting cover sheet);• I-4 (Linking form);• I-7-A (Participation Guidelines for Alternate Assessment);• I-7-ACCESS (Participation in statewide English language proficiency)” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Extended School Year (ESY) and Permissive Summer School - 05/03/2019

~~“ESY services are required special education and related services provided beyond the limits of the school term, in accordance with the child's IEP, and at no cost to the parents. These services are necessary in order to provide a free appropriate public education (FAPE). If a child needs ESY in order to receive FAPE, such services must be articulated in the child's IEP. If a child does not require ESY services in order to receive FAPE, the IEP should not include the child's participation in permissive summer school classes. For students with disabilities who do not qualify for extended school year services (ESY), districts are required by Section 504 to make reasonable accommodations to enable persons with disabilities to have the opportunity to participate. District must provide reasonable accommodations to give students with disabilities access unless those accommodations would fundamentally alter the nature of the summer programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Facilities Serving People with Developmental Disabilities (FDDs) - 04/30/2019

~~“A Facility Serving People with Developmental Disabilities (FDD) is a residential facility for four or more unrelated persons with developmental disabilities. FDDs are also known as Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID).

FDDs provide treatment to individuals with developmental disabilities to help them maintain and improve their current skills and to develop new skills (e.g., work, social, activities of daily living, education, etc.).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

2017 Wisconsin Act 178: Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment Outcomes - 02/20/2019

~~“2017 Wisconsin Act 178 requires DVR, DHS, and DPI to collaborate, with the input  of stakeholders, in  the  development  of a joint  plan to increase CIE. This plan establishes performance improvement targets, describing specific coordination methods to ensure programs, policies, and procedures support CIE. The Departments will update the plan at least biennially.  As part of the plan, each Department has developed three performance improvement targets and cross-agency objectives to implement collaboratively  to  improve  CIE outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities in the state..”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Wisconsin APSE - 12/11/2018

~~“Our Vision

WI APSE’s vision is for people with disabilities to achieve lives that maximize their potential and foster independence through employment and connection that positively impacts our Wisconsin workforce and communities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Memorandum of Understanding for the Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program - 09/24/2018

“The purpose of this MOU is for the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) and the Department of Children and Families, Division of Family and Economic Security, Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program to establish collaborative efforts regarding their services and to develop a common understanding regarding their roles, policies, and procedures to better serve individuals with disabilities who may benefit from services from both programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin’s Living Well project - 04/30/2018

~~“Project Goals• To improve coordination of consortium partners on community capacity building and community monitoring as evidenced by shared goals, resources, and measurement• To increase the perceived capacity among all five stakeholder groups to self- assess, monitor, report, reduce and/or remediate situations and environments for health, safety and quality of life• To increase the number of communities, organizations, and systems implementing recommended policies and practices• To increase the number of communities, organizations, and systems implementing a comprehensive community monitoring systemTo increase the health, safety, independence, and well-being of people with I/DD as measured by CQL’s 21 quality of life indicators measurement tool between baseline and follow-up measures” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Wisconsin Transition Interagency Agreement - 12/02/2010

This interagency agreement has been revised from the July 2007 interagency agreement to now focus on both students with disabilities transitioning from high school as well as adults with disabilities, who have an expectation for integrated competitive employment. It has also been elaborated for clarity and to reflect best practices associated with increasing employment opportunities for people with cognitive and/or physical disabilities who also have challenges with mental health. Based on recommendations made by a statewide employment task force, this agreement represents the intent to fully coordinate all of the activities and programs within each agency, for every internal and external stakeholder who is striving to achieve employment for citizens with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Interagency Agreement MOU: Adults and Transitioning Youth - 12/02/2010

“This agreement between DPI, DVR, and DHS has four overall priorities supporting integrated employment: To comply with federal legal mandates under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA). To provide practical guidance, technical assistance, and training to internal and external stakeholders and staff regarding employment-related services and supports. To provide information on employment services to individuals with disabilities and their family members or guardians so they will be able to participate fully in employment. To provide clarification of roles of stakeholders within each respective department regarding individuals with disabilities who have identified support needs associated with employment and independent living, so that individuals and their families may regard such efforts to be as seamless, non-duplicative, and as transparent as possible.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Department of Health Services’ Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF): Final Report - 07/18/2008

“Against this backdrop, the Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF) was convened in May 2007 by Division of Long-Term Care Administrator Sinikka Santala and charged with recommending a comprehensive strategy to expand work options for adults who rely on the community-based, long-term care system. The Task Force, composed of 28 members representing a wide range of interests and expertise, analyzed the challenges and identified best practices from Wisconsin and elsewhere for overcoming these challenges.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Committee for people with disability Work plan

The Governor’s Committee for People with Disabilities: • Advises the Governor and state agencies on problems faced by people with disabilities, • Reviews legislation and advises the Governor about legislation affecting people with disabilities, • Suggests to the Governor and state agencies ways to enhance the effective operations of publicity and privately administered or supported programs serving people with disabilities, • Promotes the goal of self-sufficiency for people with disabilities, • Promotes the collection, dissemination and incorporation of adequate information about persons with disabilities into public planning at all levels of government, • Promotes public awareness of needs and abilities of people with disabilities, and • Encourages the effective involvement of people with disabilities in government.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other

Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities

“Transition is helping students with disabilities and their families think about their life after high school and identify long-range goals designing the high school experience to ensure that students gain the skills and connections they need to achieve these goals the provision of funds and services to local school districts to assist in the transition process.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Survival Coalition of Wisconsin Disability Organizations

“The intention of the Wisconsin Employment First Coalition is to partner with people with disabilities, other stakeholders, businesses and the public to increase awareness of the need to provide integrated employment opportunities here in Wisconsin. Survival Coalition supports integrated employment as the presumed outcome for people with disabilities. They believe that everyone can and should work in integrated jobs.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

Wisconsin has an APSE chapter.  “WI APSE believes that a state-wide Employment First effort is a vital component to the goal of increasing employment outcomes for citizens with disabilities in a manner that promotes equality of opportunity…Between May and September 2009, WI APSE facilitated group discussions about employment opportunities in eight locations around the state.” This document is a compilation of their observations, suggestions and next steps to implementing Employment First in Wisconsin.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Wisconsin Employment First Grant Recipients - 09/22/2017

“The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities awarded Employment First Partner grants to 14 community organizations, including: schools, employment providers, managed care organizations, and advocacy organizations.  These organizations will work in their local communities to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Activities will include:  legislative breakfasts, Take Your Legislator to Work visits, business recognition events; leadership mentoring, media campaigns, public service announcements, commercials, community conversations, presentations to local civic groups (e.g., chambers, Rotary clubs) and employer groups, business tours, and business to business mentoring.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

WI Project SEARCH - 07/01/2017

“Project SEARCH is a business led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration. A 9-12 month program, Project SEARCH provides total immersion in a large community business. Students with disabilities are offered a workforce alternative for their last year of high school. All participants must be eligible for services with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). At some sites, young adults who have completed high school may be eligible to participate in Project SEARCH.

The Project SEARCH partnership includes a local high status business, a school, DVR, a vocational services agency and a disability services agency, such as a managed care organization. The business provides an on-site training classroom, business liaison and rotational internships for on the job training. The school provides an instructor. DVR works with a local vocational services agency to supply job coaches who support students in their internships as needed and assist with final job placement. The disability services agency provides follow along services for any eligible student who is hired at the business site or in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2011

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project." Wisconsin received a grant to support their Rural Supported Employment and Peer Support Programs.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

MIG-RATS

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Wisconsin PROMISE Initiative

The PROMISE initiative is intended to improve services for youth SSI (Social Security Supplemental Security Income) recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI.   PROMISE is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Social Security Administration, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. Department of Labor.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Disability Employment Initiative

"The WI Disability Employment Initiative was designed to ‘improve the accessibility and accountability of the public workforce development system for individuals with disabilities,’ extending ‘promising practices implemented by disability program navigators.’ Wisconsin’s Disability Employment Initiative will ‘improve coordination and collaboration among employment and training and asset development programs carried out at a state and local level.’ Linking to the ‘Ticket to Work program,’ Wisconsin seeks to build what members of Congress termed ‘effective community partnerships that leverage public and private resources to better serve individuals with disabilities and improve employment outcomes.’”  The grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WI Partnerships in Employment Systems Change Grant (Let’s Get to Work)

~~“The Wisconsin Let’s Get to Work project was a five-year, national systems change grant seeking to improve community employment outcomes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities in transition.

Manitowoc’s Jobs First Campaign Kick OffFunded by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities the project focused on improving, developing and implementing policies and practices that raise community expectations and overall employment outcomes for youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 10/01/2019

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence. All DVR services must be provided in competitive wage and integrated settings.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind”—rural and urban residents; ethnic or racial minorities; young adults; hourly and variable/seasonal-wage workers; those unaware of or without sufficient coverage options; retail workers; those re-entering from previous incarceration; and self employed individuals.. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Northwest Wisconsin Concentrated Economic Program, Inc. (NWCEP), African-American Men’s Health Education Center, Centro Hispano, Foundation for Black Women’s Wellness.  They will partner with Rapid Response Team, Transitional jobs program, VITA sites, Centro Hispano, Local barber shops, Black Women's Wellness Coalition, Boys and Girls Club, and Wisconsin Job Centers  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:llison EspesethPhone: (608) 890-4784Email: aehales@wisc.edu

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DPI distributes $1.9 billion to Wisconsin schools - 06/17/2019

~~“The department used $2.3 million in flexible federal funds to bolster $9.4 million in state allocations for this aid program. In addition, Special Education Transition Incentive Grants totaling $3.0 million went to 360 school districts and independent charter schools, in proportion to the number of their graduates with disabilities who were in successful employment or education one year after graduation. Finally, the department sent $1.8 million in Supplemental Special Education Aid to 11 small school districts where special education costs were high relative to district revenue.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Transition Readiness Grant Application Evidence-Based Practices Fund - 02/01/2019

~~“The Transition Readiness Grant program was established in FY 19 to assist districts and charter schools   under   Wis.   Stat. § 118.40(2r) and (2x) in   expanding   capacity   to   provide   transition   services   for   pupils   with   disabilities.   School   districts   and   charter   schools   under   Wis.   Stat.   § 118.40(2r) and (2x) are eligible to compete for funding for FY 20 that supports evidence-based practices related to successful transition from high school to beyond for students with IEPs. More about the $1.5 million Transition Readiness Grant Program can be found by accessing the weblink. Million- fund  will  support  ”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WISCONSIN Department of Workforce 2018 STATE OF WISCONSIN ANNUAL REPORT “Veteran Outreach” - 12/18/2018

~~“DWD's Office of Veterans Employment Services (OVES), in partnership with the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation and the Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), participated in a national campaign to promote Wisconsin as a top state for veterans and their spouses to locate after ending their military service. DWD and partner agencies participated in three transition summits and related events, which attracted more than 3,200 attendees. Nearly half of all veterans and spouses that the team interacted with now have active cases with either DVA or OVES, with state staff providing intensive employment services.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation Service Provider Training - 06/13/2018

“Service Provider Personnel are required to complete the technical specification training videos for each of the DVR Statewide Services they will provide to DVR consumers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 05/22/2018

“This year’s Employment First conference is shifting gears to provide an intensive, collaborative day of learning and problem solving for service providers, funders, and self-advocates who want to transform services to support people with disabilities to build full lives in their communities that include employment, volunteering, recreational, social and other community activities.

Building Full Lives is a specific set of support strategies that simultaneously teach people with disabilities new skills in their communities, while creating flexible supports that allow people to fully participate in opportunities of their choosing.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • WIOA

Transition Action Guide For Post-School Planning - 04/17/2017

~~“This Technical Assistance Guide (TAG) was developed to assist in the improvement of communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. It was designed to be useful for all persons and agencies (stakeholders) involved in the transition process.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Self-Employment Toolkit V2.0 - 12/19/2013

“This toolkit was developed to assist DVR staff and consumers through the self-employment process. It addresses all areas of the process, from how to start the initial conversation with the consumer, through opening the business and closing the case successfully. The process outlined in this toolkit is in a 12-step format. Each step has a purpose and should be completed prior to moving on to the next step. It is expected that this process will be followed for all start-up self-employment cases.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation: Customized Self-Employment Toolkit - 08/01/2012

“This tool has been developed to assist DVR Staff throughout the exploration and development of a small business for consumers who need a customized or supported approach to self-employment. A consumer requiring a customized approach may need supports to develop and/or maintain the business. Supports could include: long term job coaching supports, ongoing case management, peer supports, natural supports, family supports or ongoing paid professional services for the business, etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Children's Long-Term Support Waiver Program Amendment Number:WI.0414.R03.02 - 07/01/2019

~~“Per the terms of a corrective action plan (CAP) required by CMS, Wisconsin has developed a uniform statewide rate-setting methodology for most CLTS waiver services. The following waiver services are subject to a statewide rate schedule:•     Adult family home•     Child care•     Community integration services•     Counseling and therapeutic services•     Daily living skills training•     Day services•     Financial management services•     Mentoring•     Nursing services•     Respite•     Support and service coordination•     Supported employment•     Supportive home care•     Transportation” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration - 05/16/2019

~~“Wisconsin received a federal award for a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration. The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

This page has links to information on the program

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Settings Rule: FAQs - 02/20/2019

~~“The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) has received numerous questions concerning the Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS) waivers settings rule. These FAQs provide guidance on the requirements in the settings rule. More information can be found by accessing the web link ”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct) - 08/02/2018

~~The IRIS program is a Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver for self-directed long-term supports. The program is an option for adults with long-term care needs. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Division of Medicaid Services (DMS), Office of IRIS Management under the authorization of the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services (CMS) is responsible for oversight of the IRIS program.

IRIS is available to Wisconsin residents determined financially eligible for Medicaid, functionally in need of nursing home or Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) level of care; and living in a county where managed long-term care and IRIS are available. People who are eligible have the choice of IRIS or managed care through their local Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 08/01/2018

~~“This webpage shares key information related to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) final rule for Medicaid home and community-based services waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Integration Program Ended June 30, 2018 - 07/06/2018

~~“he Community Integration Program (CIP) was replaced by the Family Care, Family Care Partnership, and IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct) programs on July 1, 2018. For more information, contact the aging and disability resource center in your area.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Family Care Program - 07/05/2018

~~"The Family Care Partnership Program is an integrated health and long-term care program for frail elderly and people with disabilities. The Partnership Program consists of several managed care organizations located in different geographical regions of Wisconsin. A program similar to Partnership is the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Statewide Transition Plan (Medicaid)

The Department of Health Services (DHS) intends to transition the Community Recovery Services (CRS) program currently operating under the 1915(i) authority to a 1905(a) State Plan authority effective January 1, 2015, pending CMS approval. The DHS has issued a public notice regarding this transition under the Wisconsin State Register published November 15, 2014. If CMS does not approve the transition of the CRS program from a 1915(i) to a 1905(a) State Plan service, then DHS agrees to follow the statewide transition plan for Medicaid HCBS as outlined in this plan.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The motto of Wisconsin is "Forward," and it's clear to see that things are moving forward on Employment First initiatives that are empowering individuals with disabilities to find success in the careers they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Wisconsin’sVR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
5,813,568
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
322,172
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
135,105
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0%
Change from
2017 to 2018
41.94%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.22%
Change from
2017 to 2018
82.82%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 5,778,709 5,795,483 5,813,568
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 344,120 339,267 322,172
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 143,726 142,285 135,105
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,612,737 2,626,044 2,639,521
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.77% 41.94% 41.94%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.20% 82.64% 82.82%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.10% 3.30% 3.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.50% 19.80% 18.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.70% 10.20% 10.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 341,711 338,197 329,596
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 344,422 339,752 337,608
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 589,836 585,250 578,526
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 49,835 49,861 45,920
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 35,451 32,245 32,092
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,209 7,651 8,267
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,819 9,655 9,448
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 158
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 16,677 16,668 16,669
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 11,342 8,728 8,216

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 11,140 11,105 10,886
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.80% 9.80% 9.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 160,929 160,916 158,502

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 3,604 4,133 5,143
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,961 5,637 7,157
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 15,352 15,267 17,702
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.50% 27.10% 29.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.60% 3.90% 4.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.20% 2.80% 3.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 12.20% 14.10% 11.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 5.30% 4.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 864 1,140 1,461
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 752 816 1,070
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,126 4,065 3,866
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 977 1,534 1,515

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 17,223 15,934 16,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 106 100 118
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 70 77 87
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 66.00% 77.00% 74.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.22 1.33 1.51

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
8,374
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 192 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 617 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,506 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,476 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,029 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 553 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.90% 32.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8,850 8,545 8,582
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 238,092 240,149 238,790
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 439 340 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 632 485 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $23,873,000 $25,398,000 $25,579,423
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $48,800,000 $46,586,000 $44,051,379
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $82,849,000 $86,652,000 $88,228,569
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,102,000 $9,677,000 $10,384,821
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 19.00% 20.00% 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,110 3,288 3,275
Number of people served in facility based work. 7,243 7,083 6,733
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 8,170 8,471 8,637
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 55.80 56.90 58.49

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.22% 67.39% 68.94%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.16% 8.84% 8.48%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.50% 1.43% 1.44%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.83% 99.93% 99.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.44% 28.40% 27.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.39% 71.12% 68.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.05% 83.15% 81.95%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.95% 42.72% 40.45%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,759,088
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 269,729
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,118,183
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,387,912
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 410
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 862
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,272
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,894,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $16,572,273

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 4 2 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 62 67 59
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 5 4 2
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 71 73 61
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 5 3 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6,253 6,321 4,918
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 301 299 205
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6,559 6,623 5,123

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

SES does include use of the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery. (Page 165) Title I

Customized Employment services can be used if an individual has not been successful utilizing SES.SES in Wisconsin utilize a consumer centered resource team. This team includes the DVR consumer, DVR staff, the Supported Employment service provider, the special education or other teacher, long-term support career planner, the guardian or anyone else the consumer chooses to invite. (Page 169) Title I

Changes to SES are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long-term care system and DVR's service provider network.

The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and several internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2016, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys regarding service capacity for SES services. In addition, focus groups were conducted with WRC of providers to discuss SES services and barriers in providing services including expansion to underserved areas. (Page 206) Title IV

o Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long-term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. (Page 211) Title IV

o DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county-based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee-for-service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community-based SES and LTES in lieu of center-based extended employment. (Pages 212-213) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 3: Utilize evidence-based practices that advance the employment of individuals with the most significant disabilities needed additional supports. SES will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery. Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

DVR achieved this goal. Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long-term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. (Page 226) Title IV

501. DVR staff is also involved with the planning and provision of supported employment training including customized employment in collaboration with the Wisconsin PROMISE Grant. (Page 233) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~DVR developed an agreement with DHS, Division of Long Term Care with guidelines for making determinations of payment for service for common customers. The agreement is intended to provide clarification of funding responsibilities for adults seeking competitive employment who may also require short-term employment supports through DVR and long-term employment supports through the Family Care system. This agreement defines and guides practice and provides a structure to coordinate service planning, appropriately blend and braid funding and to resolve disputes. The agreement will be updated prior to the next state plan submission to reflect WIOA requirements. (Page 150) Title I

Programmatic Goal 6: DVR will collaborate with other partners, most importantly long-term care services, to provide a braided approach to working with individuals with the most significant disabilities needing additional employment supports.

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including IPS (via Medicaid waiver approved funds).The Division of Long Term Care within DHS uses a Managed Care approach to provide employment services to individuals with developmental and physical disabilities.

DVR conducts regular collaborative meetings and activity with sources of long-term support including managed care organizations, self-directed managed care and county programs to facilitate referrals, service coordination and increase outcomes. (Page 205) Title IV

o DVR will additionally work more closely with the long-term care community to assist co-enrolled adults who seek integrated work opportunities in the community. Braiding services and offering an array of funded services will help disabled individuals achieve successful outcomes, providing immense opportunities for both the long-term care and DVR consumers. DVR has established an on-going and collaborative relationship with various groups to facilitate communication and coordination of services to mutual consumers. This collaboration has included cross-training, local outreach, common policy instruction. DVR has also implemented enhanced data collection to better track outcomes and successful closure information within the DVR case management system. (Page 213) Title IV

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. The TAG is the tool that is used to help make those braided funding decisions. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services. Staff of all three potential funding sources (DVR, DPI and DHS) are trained in the use of this decision-making process outlined in the TAG. (Page 218) Title IV.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Wisconsin's participation in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) has positioned the state well for continued physical and programmatic compliance. As a "Round Two" DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed a 3-year, $2,330,000 demonstration project, which was designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource support improved the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6-month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post-DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin by:
• Ensuring accessibility in all 11 WDAs 
   o Pilot areas:
        WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues.
   o Control areas:
        All five control WDAs were offered the opportunity for ADA inspections, which resulted in the completion of eight inspections in three WDAs;
        All five control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI, which resulted in nine Job Centers in four WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, specialized keyboards, etc. 
   o All WDAs:
         49 job centers have identical set up of new computers, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology (AT) equipment. (Pages 81-82) Title I

The cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include:
• 1,637 job center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals' external to the Job Centers;
• 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration's Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks; 
• 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period; 
• 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 82) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~DVR is currently focusing on programs that expand financial literacy, job development, youth services, and underserved tribal populations. Each program was created to address specific local needs in respective WDAs. Topics include: banking basics, car purchases, budgeting, understanding credit, employment barriers, online applications, social skills, temporary work experiences, self-advocacy, and obtaining gainful employment. Throughout the year, quarterly reports are due to DVR for review of progress and scope. It is anticipated for these services to transition from I & E funding to fee-for-service agreements upon successful effective completion. DVR has implemented services to potentially eligible around the state. (Page 215) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~DVR renewed non-financial MOU with the University of Wisconsin System and the Wisconsin Technical College System Board. The purpose of the MOU is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of DVR and the Institution of Higher Education in fostering a seamless delivery system supporting the DVR IPE and common customers engaged in training at a post-secondary institution as a means to achieve their employment goal. Included in the MOU is an agreement to coordinate financial aid information so that the DVR consumers can make maximum effort to secure financial aid grants.

Each MOU described above is published on the DVR public website. 

o UW System MOU: https://dwd.wisconsin.gov/dvr/pdf_files/uw_system_mou.pdf 
o Wisconsin Technical College System MOU: https://dwd.wisconsin.gov/dvr/pdf_files/wtcs_mou.pdf   (Page 151) Title IV

DVR is primarily responsible for assuring that services within the Scope of VR Services (34 CFR 361.48) are available to assist eligible individuals with an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in achieving their employment goals.

As needed to assure the timely and continuous provision of IPE services, the agency's financial priority is to expend Title I-B operational and discretionary case aid funds to assure the timely and continuous availability and delivery of services to these individuals over the anticipated term of their service plans. DVR will maintain an IPE obligation reserve to secure the continuous and timely provision of employment plan services. The case aids budget will be dedicated to the continuous and timely support of IPE services and to develop and activate employment plans for eligible individuals with most significant and significant disabilities in a timely manner from the DVR waitlist. (Page 154) Title I

Per DVR policy students with disabilities are recommended to apply for DVR services at least two years prior to graduation. The plan for employment should be developed as soon as possible, but the time shall not exceed 90 days after eligibility for DVR services is determined. DVR staff will use rapid engagement and motivational interviewing techniques when working with this population.

DVR, in collaboration with the local education agency, will provide services to assist the student in developing and successfully achieving their IPE goal. (Page 157) Title I

The DVR Policy Manual states “Transition: For high school students who are eligible for development of a plan for employment, the plan for employment will be completed prior to leaving high school”.

It is understood by all DVR staff working with transition age students that their responsibility is to coordinate with the school’s efforts to engage the student in activities that will allow development of an IPE before the student leaves high school.

The TAG, which is an integral part of the Interagency Agreement, calls for referral of students no later than two years prior to exit from school. This allows time for the necessary career exploration, job shadows, and integrated work experiences leading to the development of an IPE prior to matriculation. DVR assures that the individualized plan for employment is also coordinated with the employment goal in the school’s individualized educational plan and, where appropriate, the individualized service plans of the long-term care service providers. (Page 158) Title I

4.To provide clarification of roles of stakeholders within each respective department regarding individuals with disabilities who have identified support needs associated with employment and independent living, so that individuals and their families may regard such efforts to be as seamless, non-duplicative, and as transparent as possible.

The Interagency Agreement and the TAG describe the role of DVR including the responsibility to provide consultation and technical assistance, referred to as Employment Planning Consultation. The agreement addresses the need for DVR liaisons and staff to provide school districts that have transition students who have not yet applied for VR services with assistance,
strategies and creative ideas for identifying the students’ post-school employment goals, needs for services, and concerns to be addressed in achieving those goals.

DVR staff attends IEP meetings, with consent from the student and family to assist those students, parents and teachers in the development of the transition portion of the IEP. DVR staff can provide information the types of employment services we offer. This provides the opportunity for the IEP to be developed in collaboration and coordination with their IPE. Having a consisted employment goal and coordinated services in the IEP and IPE is important to ensure the student receives the most appropriate and valuable services from both DVR and the LEA. DVR is also available to provide information and technical assistance on transition services to teachers, parents, and other organizations and councils.

As outlined in the TAG and the DVR Policy the development of the plan for employment for students who are eligible for plan development, is to occur prior to the student leaving school. DVR staff and educators are encouraged to coordinate the provision of services and transition activities for students who are eligible for both IEP and an IPE services to assist them in transitioning from school to work. (Pages 159-160) Title I

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services.

The following are general guidelines to help understand how decisions can be made under the DVR/DPI/DHS interagency agreement.
Test 1 - Will the service help to achieve the educational goal of the IEP? If yes, the school is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 2 - Will the service help to achieve the employment goal of the IPE? If yes, DVR is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 3 - If the same service appears on both the IEP and IPE, the school and DVR are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement (conflicts between schools and DVR are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement). (Page 162) Title IV

The current average caseload of total individuals served with an active IPE in Wisconsin is 15,000 individuals. DVR is projecting a possible increase of consumers needing SES. This increase is due to the impact of the provisions in WIOA to serve youth and students and the annual requirement for the DSU to establish contact with workers in a 14 (c) environment. (Page 165) Title IV

DVR has been a partner in efforts to establish the use of an Academic and Career plan for all student in Wisconsin schools including the use of this plan in informing IEP's and IPE's. Through the partnerships, students with the most significant disabilities are participating in competitive, integrated work-related activities will still in high school. This has significantly increased the interest in supported employment services for youth in Wisconsin. Some tools that DVR has developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT -   agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job, job shadows, business tours, job coaching, internship and temporary work, coordinated soft skill training and other employer training with DPI and local school districts while youth are still in high school Once a specific IPE job goal is developed and the youth has obtained employment consistent with the job goal, supported employment services to provide ongoing support, including extended services if needed, will be provided. (Pages 167-168) Title IV

Supported Employment is widely available and is always an available service and outcome for youth. Due to the increased availability of work based learning, and the federally required diversion from 14 (c) employment and paid work options for youth it is expected that there will be many more youth needing SES in Wisconsin. For youth that are interested in supported employment, the Career Profile is provided as part of the comprehensive assessment. The purpose of the career profile is to get information from the consumer and others on the support team. This information will be gathered during interviews. The information for the career profile will be used to help in choosing job or career goal, for job searching and for figuring out how to support the youth on the job. (Page 168) Title IV

(9) Services provided under an IPE will be coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other Federal or State programs;

DVR has a policy in place for the coordination of IEP's and IPE's prior to graduation and prior to that when necessary. In the past, service and treatment plans with long-term care and mental health were coordinated and services identified and funding responsibilities determined. (Page 170) Title IV

DVR has identified 35,000 students in the Wisconsin public school systems that are eligible for VR services. Additionally, through the Promise Grant, we know that over 6,000 youth between the ages of 14-16 are receiving SSI and may or may not have an active IEP. Wisconsin, through its Promise Grant and supported employment experience, believes that targeting outreach to SSI and individuals with the most significant disabilities will allow for strategic niche for needed VR services and collaboration with the schools. DVR will continue to collaborate through the TAG and the active coordination of services with education and long-term care services. DVR continues to coordinate transition services via IEP meetings, transition fairs, collaboration with transition coordinators, and involvement in school/work-related activities under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Page 197) Title IV

DVR is shifting its focus to a student, youth and supported employment model to ensure that the populations targeted for WIOA outreach have access to VR services. DVR has changed policies and fee schedules on transportation and existing business. In addition, DVR has implemented student work based learning technical specifications and fee schedules. (Page 215) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 1: DVR will transition to a youth-focused, most significantly disabled caseload to ensure that all individuals with disabilities who want to work have the opportunity to share their talents with the community and businesses.

DVR achieved this goal by ensuring that every high school in Wisconsin has a DVR liaison assigned and provides outreach to students with disabilities. DVR has a strong collaboration with the Department of Public Instruction and continues to implement the DVR/DPI/DHS Interagency agreement and Transition Action Guide to assist high school's students transition from school to work. DVR is committed to developing and implementing an eligible high school student’s IPE as early as possible during the transition from high school planning process. DVR will develop a student’s IPE prior to graduation. In accordance with the MOU between DVR and DPI, DVR will maintain contact with students and education agencies, attend transition meetings to provide transition planning consultation and technical assistance.

DVR has ensured it has made available Pre-ETS services to both eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities including developing new service technical specifications, such as its new Work Based Learning Services, to meet the service needs of students and youth with disabilities. DVR tracks the number of students it works with to help ensure we are having a youth-focus. (Pages 225-226) Title IV

The IPE for DVR consumers, who select competitive employment in an integrated setting but may require long term employment support, usually begins with an assessment called a career Profile to help determine the employment goal related to the consumer’s interests and strengths. The assessment process may include trial work or other employment explorations to help identify the extent of supports that may be necessary. If needed, the potential source(s) of funding for the long-term employment supports must also be identified. If the source of extended services cannot be identified at the time of implementation of the employment plan, the plan must at least identify the services, activities and/or progress measures designed to identify the nature, type, scope, requirements and source of extended services. The DVR identifies extended services from private nonprofit organization, employers, and other appropriate resources for an individual with a most significant disability transitioning from employment supports provided by the DVR. SES are provided only to those individuals with the most significant disabilities and who, as may be required, have an identified likely source of long term support. (Pages 233-234) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~DVR will continue to consider collaborative agreements with State Agency Departments to target and increase paid OJT internship opportunities for DVR job seekers in state positions.
This initiative is designed to access state limited term employment (LTE) positions to expand the number of state employment opportunities that contribute to the skills and work experience of persons with disabilities served by DVR. The goal of the OJT LTE paid internship is that upon successful completion, DVR sponsored intern will have valuable experience and references for their resume and will be prepared to compete for available LTE or permanent state agency positions. (Page 50) Title I

DVR has been a partner in efforts to establish the use of an Academic and Career plan for all student in Wisconsin schools including the use of this plan in informing IEP's and IPE's. Through the partnerships, students with the most significant disabilities are participating in competitive, integrated work-related activities will still in high school. This has significantly increased the interest in supported employment services for youth in Wisconsin. Some tools that DVR has developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT -   agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job, job shadows, business tours, job coaching, internship and temporary work, coordinated soft skill training and other employer training with DPI and local school districts while youth are still in high school Once a specific IPE job goal is developed and the youth has obtained employment consistent with the job goal, supported employment services to provide ongoing support, including extended services if needed, will be provided. (Pages 167-168) Title IV

Private-sector and state agency employers have benefited significantly from the following DVR OJT initiatives:
o Since Fiscal Year 2016, more than 800 OJT private-sector hires were supported by a 50% payroll cost subsidy for employers providing up to 90 days of OJT following a hire.
o In this same time period, DVR has invested nearly $750,00 for more than 104 DVR job-seekers participating in six-month OJT internships with 23 state agencies and other public entities. (Pages 171-172) Title IV

o DVR will continue to find partnership opportunities with DHS and DPI to continue outreach to youth with the most significant disabilities who may need supported employment. DVR will work with schools to offer work experiences while still in high school, ensuring a more hopeful employment path when reaching adulthood. DVR also developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job. (Page 212) Title IV 

DVR will continue to provide an OJT affirmative hiring initiative to assist employers with the initial cost of training a hired DVR job seeker. DVR area managers train CRP job-placement staff on the use of the OJT initiative. CRP job placement staff is encouraged to use the OJT initiative when they speak to employers about hiring DVR job seekers.  (Page 222) Title IV

o DVR continues to find partnership opportunities with DHS and DPI to continue outreach to transition students who may need supported employment. DVR will work with schools to offer work experiences to transition students while still in high school, ensuring a more hopeful employment path when reaching adulthood. DVR also developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job. DVR utilizes and trains staff to its Interagency agreement and Transition Action Guide between DVR/DPI/DHS to help students transition from school to work successfully. (Page 228) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~• 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration's Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks; (Page 82) Title I

The PROMISE initiative is a research and demonstration project that is intended to improve services for youth Social Security Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI. Wisconsin is one of six sites participating in the demonstration. (Page 175) Title IV

o DVR develop methods to increase consumer awareness of work incentives and Partnership Plus options and evaluate the impact on outcomes for SSI/DI recipients as the WRC recommended through their observation that employment outcomes for SSI/DI recipients appear to have lower earnings and hours than the general VR population.  (Page 192) Title IV

The PROMISE initiative is a research and demonstration project that is intended to improve services for youth Social Security SSI recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school, ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI. Wisconsin is one of six sites participating in the demonstration. (Page 218) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work.

DVR achieved this goal. DVR continues to encourage work incentive benefits counseling for consumers receiving benefits. DVR has technical specifications that are followed and used by our service providers for this service. In SFY 2017 over 3,000 consumers received work incentives benefits counseling. Our counselors also provide guidance and counseling to our consumers on the benefits of work. DVR continues to promote the “Partnership Plus” opportunities in the TTW program. DVR will share information with eligible Ticket holders on post-VR services and supports available through assignment of their Ticket to an approved employment network provider. (Pages 226-227) Title IV

In Wisconsin, supported employment is funded by primarily three sources; DVR Title I-B and long-term funding directed by DHS, Division of Long Term Care (DHS/DLTC) and Division of Care and Treatment Services (DCTS) Funds are managed locally by regional managed care organizations or a self-directed support system known as IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct)) and Managed Care Organizations (MCO's) Mental Health long term supports are managed locally by each county.

To a much lesser extent, Social Security Plans to Achieve Self-Support (PASS) plans, the TTW, natural supports and private party payments have been used to maintain a small number of individuals in long-term supported employment. DVR is promoting the TTW Partnership Plus to ticket holders which has the potential to increase funding for long-term supports. These financial resources enhance the quality, scope, and extent of services proposed under the Title VI plan. (Page 232) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~DVR supports a "dual-customer" approach to service delivery; serving both individuals with disabilities who want to work and the businesses who want to connect to this talent pool. DVR offers services to businesses that include outreach, follow along, and customized services geared toward meeting business needs. DVR Business Services are part of a collaborative workforce solutions system that also includes other state agencies and workforce partners. DVR Business Services team members participate in collaborative training with other business services professionals to ensure a shared understanding of the various programs and services available to business, share best practices, and work toward a consistent service delivery strategy statewide. Business services professionals representing various programs and services serve on a local business services team, and use a shared business relationship (account) management system to effectively communicative activities with businesses in real-time. (Page 30) Title I

DWD's mission: Advancing Wisconsin's economy and business climate by empowering and supporting the workforce. DVR believes this initiative, transitioning the DVR Business Service Consultant (BSC) project positions into permanent positions, best demonstrates a new customer for DVR that fits well with the department's priorities of meeting the workforce needs of Wisconsin's business. DVR fully embraces the dual customer role of serving the workforce needs of Wisconsin's business community while building the needed talent through our DVR job seeker clientele. DVR is the state's preferred talent portal and by having a closer relationship to our business customer, DVR has been able to exceed our employment goal since the BSCs have been part of the DVR service delivery model. (Page 171) Title IV

The BSCs serve to improve business outreach and retention, assisting DWD and DVR meet our state's draft performance measure of Employer Penetration and Retention Rate(s). This enables businesses in Wisconsin to learn about and receive business services DWD and partners can offer. The goal of new businesses receiving services from a DVR BSC is to encourage new business connections and repeat business customers. BSCs are available as technical advisors for: employers on ADA, accommodations and other disability services as described in WIOA; and for their employees developing disabilities throughout their tenure with an employer.

BSCs serve on regional Business Service Teams, coordinating business service(s) with WIOA partners as well as other partner agencies serving business and economic development. This has improved seamless business service delivery to businesses in Wisconsin.

BSCs are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the 7,000 job seekers on DVR caseloads match the skills that are needed by businesses. This allows DVR counselors to spend more time with job seekers who require intensive IPE development and career counseling. (Page 171) Title IV

DVR BSCs are part of the Business Service teams located in each of the 11 WDAs. Along with other workforce partners, the BSCs conduct outreach to businesses to assess needs and share the needs and job openings with all the workforce partners. Wisconsin workforce partners, through a DOL federal grant, developed a common data system that tracks all business contacts and provides all the workforce partners with a common platform of business leads. DVR staff play a significant role in sharing the business needs with other partners and, in turn, have access to other business leads developed by workforce partners. DVR uses JCW Business, along with DET and other partners to collaborative provide business services and dually report the pilot performance measures for WIOA. (Page 172) Title IV

Business Services Focused on Transition and Pre-ETS
Transition and has been a significant focus for DVR, including business services. Project Search Expansion has resulted in increased business connections and BSC outreach to Project Search sites and business partners. The Business Committees required of Project Search sites has further enhanced DVR's relationship with businesses and educating businesses in the value of hiring and retaining people with disabilities. Business Service Consultants are members of Project Search Business Committees and promote internship and hiring practices for students with disabilities.
Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) have expanded our connections with businesses interested in working with and recruiting students. DVR has developed Pre-ETS services that improve our connection with local workforce boards and business connections developed through WIOA partner efforts. DVR, via contracted service providers, have established fee-for-service Pre-ETS services, including job shadows. Job Shadows allow students with disabilities to explore different career opportunities and at the same time expose the business (that is being job shadowed) to future student interns and/or permanent employees. Paid Internships and Job Shadows promoted via business services and WIOA partners have facilitated student job shadows and internships that have resulted in a student permanently hired for his/her first job. (Page 173) Title IV

DVR Business Service Consultants are part of the Business Service teams located in each of the 11 WDAs. Along with other workforce partners, the BSCs conduct outreach to businesses and share the needs and job openings with all the workforce partners. DVR staffs play a significant role in sharing the business needs with other partners and, in turn, have access to other business leads developed by workforce partners. (Page 230) Title IV

An important outcome of listening to business needs includes the development of specialized training programs either with other workforce partners or solely developed with DVR consumers, helping DVR job seekers obtain the needed curriculum instruction, experience and recruitment assistance necessary to meet the talent needs of specific employers. (Page 231) Title IV

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~In 2015, an extensive effort was completed related to examining to the needs of individuals who may need supported employment. DVR examined data provided by DPI, data provided by the Equal Rights Division (administrator of one 14(c) program in Wisconsin), as well as other sources to determine the number of consumers that will potentially need SES required under WIOA. The potential number of students with IEP's needing services is identified at 35,000 and the number of individuals currently served under just one of the 14(c) available subminimum wage certificates is 6,500 individuals. The current average caseload of total individuals served with an active IPE in Wisconsin is 15,000 individuals. DVR is projecting a possible increase of consumers needing SES. This increase is due to the impact of the provisions in WIOA to serve youth and students and the annual requirement for the DSU to establish contact with workers in a 14 (c) environment. (Page 165) Title IV

DVR, working with DPI, DWD-Equal Rights Division who administers the subminimum wage licenses and reviewing federal reports has identified the following targeted opportunities for DVR outreach:
o In-school Youth: Approximately 35,000 students.  
o Subminimum Wage: 6,500 individuals.
o Subminimum Wage and Child Labor Permit (under 18 years): 1,000 youth.
o With this new targeted information, DVR will work with education and long-term care agencies to operationalize new federally mandated requirements to engage in direct outreach to these individuals.
o Individuals on OOS Waiting List - DVR has addressed the waitlist so that in FFY 2015 individuals with a most significant disability will continue to be immediately activated. As of PY 2018, both individuals with a most significant disability and individuals with a significant disability will continue to be immediately activated. DVR anticipates continuing to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities and significant disabilities in PY 2019, with a small amount of NSD in OOS Category Three. (Page 194) Title IV

.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The one-stop delivery system's compliance with Section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the ADA are ensured through the State of Wisconsin's Methods of Administration (MOA), submitted to the US DOL's Civil Rights Center (CRC). Compliance with these provisions are assured through the State's Nondiscrimination Plan, required in the revised Section 188 nondiscrimination and equal opportunity regulations 29 CFR part §38in effect as of January 3, 2017. (Page 80) Title IV

Local EO Officers are required to complete a Section 188 Disability Accessibility Checklist annually as well as conducting physical accessibility reviews of one-stop job centers and affiliate sites to ensure all facilities used in providing program services and activities are accessible to individuals with a disability. Local EO Officers have the option to use the "Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) for the Design, Construction and Alteration of Buildings" or the "ADA Checklist for Existing Facilities" produced by the New England ADA Center to conduct the physical accessibility reviews of facilities.

The DWD-DET EO Officer conducts annual on-site monitoring review visits to local Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) to determine the Board's compliance with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements. During the on-site reviews, the DWD-DET EO Officer meets with the local EO Officer to review all areas of compliance in the local WDB WIOA programs and activities. Walk-through inspections were conducted during the review to confirm comprehensive and affiliate job center sites are physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities. (Page 81) Title I

Vets

Wisconsin's veteran population is a recognized priority in the provision of workforce development services. The state has a proud tradition of effectively transitioning its returning military professionals to civilian employment. There are more than 150,000 veterans of working age (between 18 and 64) in Wisconsin, representing another vital potential workforce resource. The state's age 18-64 veteran population has a labor force participation rate that is roughly the same as the state as a whole (1.7% smaller). The unemployment rate of veterans is lower than that of the overall population (3.4% compared to 4.0% - 2016 American Community Survey). Twenty-eight percent of veterans experience some type of disability, a rate that is more than twice that of the nonveteran population. (Page 21-22) Title I

A strength that the state of Wisconsin uses is the Job Center of Wisconsin (JCW) website which has been enhanced to include matching potential employees to employer job openings. An initiative to hire Veterans has also been implemented using WiscJobsForVets - an initiative to assist Veterans with their work search. (Page 28) Title I

DWD's DET, Office of Veterans Employment Services (OVES) is funded by the DOL Veterans and Training Services, Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG). During Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, OVES will have 41 staff funded by the JVSG grant. DET manages the JVSG from Central Office in Madison where one Director is housed. This individual provides overall guidance, direction, and oversight and reports to Division Leadership. Three JVSG funded supervisors are stationed within three regions of the state and provide day to day supervision of Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) staff. All DVOP or LVER staff are integrated within job centers throughout the state. OVES management staff ensure all LVER and DVOP staff possess knowledge of requirements specified by Title U.S.C. Chapter 31 requirements and guidance provided through DOL Veteran Program letters.

LVERs are fully integrated within the business service teams and conduct employer outreach as members of that team. The sole function of the LVER is business services and interaction with employers. DVOPs are housed at job centers and provide intensive service for veterans that are identified to have a significant barrier to employment (SBE). A pre-screen form is used to determine if veterans meet the definition of a veteran with SBE. Veterans that are determined to be SBE are referred to DVOP staff or other career planners within the job centers. DVOPs provide the intensive services necessary and use a case managed approach to assist veterans with their employment needs. In addition to providing intensive services to SBE veterans that visit the job center, DVOPs conduct outreach to find SBE veterans. DVOPs also provide intensive services for veterans that receive education training funded by the Veterans Administration Chapter 31 program. OVES has a DVOP staff that is an Intensive Service Coordinator. This staff person is located at the Milwaukee Veterans Administration Regional Office and coordinates referrals of Chapter 31 veterans to DVOP and tracks services provided. (Page 30-31) Title I

Veterans requesting employment services complete a pre-screen form that determines if they meet the DOL definition for veteran with a SBE. Any veteran that meets that definition is referred to a DVOP or a job center career planner who will provide intensive services. These services include a comprehensive assessment, and an individualized employment plan. OVES staff work with partner agencies and programs to assure that priority of service is provided to veterans. Working closely with partner agencies assures that there is not duplication of services and that veterans receive all services that they are eligible and qualified to receive. The OVES LVERs are also integrated within the Job Centers and serve as members of the local business services team. LVERs are capacity builders that work with local area employers and community organizations. LVERs promote what veterans bring to the workforce and assist employers by connecting them to qualified veterans. LVERs serve as active participants in each WDA on the business service teams. The OVES' LVER and DVOP staff is integrated within the Job Centers of each of the 11 WDAs. (Page 49) Title I

INTERAGENCY MOU WITH DVR, THE OFFICE OF VETERAN EMPLOYMENT SERVICES WITHIN DWD'S DIVISION OF EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING AND THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF VETERAN'S AFFAIRS (MILWAUKEE REGIONAL OFFICE) The purpose of the MOU is to ensure seamless, coordinated, and effective VR services to Wisconsin's Veterans with disabilities by improving cooperation and collaboration among the three agencies, avoiding duplication of services, improving inter- agency communication and establishing staff cross-training opportunities. (Page 151) Title IV

Two initiatives were included in the Wisconsin Blueprint for Prosperity that will allow DVR to expand place and train opportunities for job seekers with disabilities and Wisconsin businesses. Training Workers with Disabilities Grants, part of the Wisconsin Fast Forward grant initiative, awarded funding to businesses to develop training for high demand jobs in their industries, and to target job seekers with disabilities, including veterans with service-related disabilities, in their recruitment and hiring. (Page 172) Title IV 

Through DWDs statewide and local MOUs with the One-Stop Partners and Job Center network and DVR Workforce Investment Board MOUs, the requirements of 34 CFR Part 361.23(b) are satisfied. DVR also has an agreement with DOL funded Veterans services program to coordinate services for common customers and to deliver quality services for disabled veterans. (Page 223) Title IV

The State of Wisconsin OVES provides services to eligible veterans through a statewide network of DVOP and LVER staff. These services are available in one-stop centers, online, and in various outreach locations. OVES staff work with partner agencies and programs to assure that priority of service is provided to veterans. Working closely with partner agencies assures that there is not duplication of services and that veterans receive all services that they are eligible and qualified to receive. LVERs are members of the local business services team. LVERs also work with employers so that veterans become employed. (Page 249) Title IV

THE DVOP DUTIES, TO THE CASE MANAGED POPULATIONS SERVED, INCLUDE:

o Document and record all activity using the State of Wisconsin approved computer-based case management system. Paper case management folders are used for documents such as DD214s, certifications and Chapter 31 related information.

o Comprehensive assessment to identify barriers, education and skill levels.

o Develop an IEP with the client to identify the strategies to overcome barriers and to find employment. Conduct follow-up to determine progress in achieving employment and adjust the IEP as needed.

o As appropriate, make referrals to other agencies, supportive services, counseling, testing or job search workshops. o Assist in employment seeking activities through preparation of resumes, cover letters and application forms; instruct in use of internet and/or JCW, and access to other materials and information, such as labor market analysis.

o Develop strong linkages with partner agencies to assure that there is an agreed understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the DVOP and partner staff in providing services to veterans.

o Coordinate with LVERs to refer veterans to job openings (Page 250) Title IV

OVES LVER and DVOP staff are located in the one-stop job center/career center network throughout the state of Wisconsin. LVERs are participating members of the job center business service teams. DVOPs partner with WIOA, WP, State VR staff, and other center based partner agencies, to develop employment plans and return veterans to self-sufficiency. Veteran service staff also partner with numerous non-job center based service providers. LVER staff partner with DVA, and the Wisconsin Employment Resource Connection. This partnership provides information on employment and training to active National Guard and National Guard and Reserve units. (Page 251) Title IV

Mental Health

~~DVR has identified sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children's waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment, including natural supports. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long-term support. (Page 169) Title I

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services.

The following are general guidelines to help understand how decisions can be made under the DVR/ DPI/DHS interagency agreement.

Test 1 - Will the service help to achieve the educational goal of the IEP? If yes, the school is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 2 - Will the service help to achieve the employment goal of the IPE? If yes, DVR is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 3 - If the same service appears on both the IEP and IPE, the school and DVR are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement (conflicts between schools and DVR are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement).
Test 4 - If the student is over 18 and eligible for Medicaid long-term care services and supports, and chooses to enroll in a Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health program, the three agencies are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement to determine resources for each individual’s situation. (Conflicts between agencies are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement. (Page 174) Title IV

DVR updated the interagency agreement with the state’s DPI in December of 2010. The agreement also includes DHS, Division of Long Term Care, Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, and Division of Public Health. This agreement describes the roles and responsibilities of the tri-agency state partnership which includes DVR, DPI, and DHS with respect to supports and services to youth-in-transition from high school and adults with disabilities who have an expectation for integrated competitive employment.

DVR has worked with DPI to update this agreement to revise and align with transition-related requirements with the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA. Currently, DVR is awaiting the SEA review and approval to complete final signature updating our agreement from 2010. We expect the agreement will be finalized in calendar year 2018. Once the agreement is assigned and in effect, the agreement is valid beginning on the date of signatures and will continue until it is replaced by a new agreement, terminated upon mutual agreement, or requested in writing by either party. (Page 187) Title IV

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including IPS (via Medicaid waiver approved funds) (Page 205) Title IV

DVR entered into an agreement with DHS to pilot a new comprehensive approach for the provision of supported employment to individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness called IPS. The Wisconsin IPS system change grant partnership with Dartmouth College Community Mental Health Program provides funds for mental health care employment service expansion and technical assistance. As part of the 3-year initiative, DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population. (Page 224) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 90

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 05/01/2020

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR within 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Executive Order 59 Relating to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in State Government - 11/12/2019

“WHEREAS, in Executive Order # 1, I charged the executive branch with developing policies and practices aimed at preventing discrimination, sexual harassment, or harassment of any individual on the basis of age, race, religion, ethnicity, disability, sex, physical condition, developmental disability, military or veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, marital or familial status, genetic information, or political affiliation; and

WHEREAS, equity and inclusion shall be the guiding principles and core values for every state workplace, program, activity, service, contract, and decision.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 10/01/2019

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence. All DVR services must be provided in competitive wage and integrated settings.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind”—rural and urban residents; ethnic or racial minorities; young adults; hourly and variable/seasonal-wage workers; those unaware of or without sufficient coverage options; retail workers; those re-entering from previous incarceration; and self employed individuals.. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Northwest Wisconsin Concentrated Economic Program, Inc. (NWCEP), African-American Men’s Health Education Center, Centro Hispano, Foundation for Black Women’s Wellness.  They will partner with Rapid Response Team, Transitional jobs program, VITA sites, Centro Hispano, Local barber shops, Black Women's Wellness Coalition, Boys and Girls Club, and Wisconsin Job Centers  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:llison EspesethPhone: (608) 890-4784Email: aehales@wisc.edu

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Children's Long-Term Support Waiver Program Amendment Number:WI.0414.R03.02 - 07/01/2019

~~“Per the terms of a corrective action plan (CAP) required by CMS, Wisconsin has developed a uniform statewide rate-setting methodology for most CLTS waiver services. The following waiver services are subject to a statewide rate schedule:•     Adult family home•     Child care•     Community integration services•     Counseling and therapeutic services•     Daily living skills training•     Day services•     Financial management services•     Mentoring•     Nursing services•     Respite•     Support and service coordination•     Supported employment•     Supportive home care•     Transportation” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DPI distributes $1.9 billion to Wisconsin schools - 06/17/2019

~~“The department used $2.3 million in flexible federal funds to bolster $9.4 million in state allocations for this aid program. In addition, Special Education Transition Incentive Grants totaling $3.0 million went to 360 school districts and independent charter schools, in proportion to the number of their graduates with disabilities who were in successful employment or education one year after graduation. Finally, the department sent $1.8 million in Supplemental Special Education Aid to 11 small school districts where special education costs were high relative to district revenue.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Long Term Care Functional Screen Instructions - 06/03/2019

~~“For an individual who is employed, the screener is asked to select the setting or settings where the person works. If the person is working in a facility-based setting, the screener must ask if the person is interested in working in the community.  When making a selection for an employment setting, screeners should ask questions to help the person articulate their preferences. While the person's preference may be difficult to ascertain, screeners are to use their best professional judgment to select the most accurate answer.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Fiscal Practices Manual with Training Activities - 06/01/2019

~~DVR fee schedule rates of payment are determined based upon a competitive pricing analysis and an analysis of DVR costs for these services over aperiod of time not less than one year, but no more than two years. As appropriate, DVR will set rates based upon approved state, county, or federal rates for the same purchased services. If this process is used, it will be specified in the fee schedule services provided under these agreements include:• Customized Employment• Individual Placement and Support (IPS)• Internship/Temporary Work• Job Preparation and Development including Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), JobDevelopment Hire, and Job Retention• Job Shadow• Skills to Pay the Bills• Student Work Based Learning (Pre-ETS)• Supported Employment • Systematic Instruction (Other Than Supported Employment)• Vocational Evaluation• Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI)• Work Incentive Benefits Analysis 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Mental Health: Healthy Living - 05/31/2019

~~“We are working to reduce the impact of mental illnesses on individuals and communities.Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.Positive mental health allows people to:• Realize their full potential• Cope with the stresses of life• Work productively• Make meaningful contributions to their communities”

This page has links to programs that can assist persons with mental health conditions

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration - 05/16/2019

~~“Wisconsin received a federal award for a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration. The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

This page has links to information on the program

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

2017 WISCONSIN ACT 323 - 04/17/2018

~~“COACHING PROGRAM ESTABLISHED.   2017 WISCONSIN ACT 323: AN ACT to amend 20.438 (1) (a); and to create 46.2898 of the statutes; relating to: employment of individuals withdisabilities enrolled in long−term care programs and making an appropriation.  More information about the legislation concerning a model of coaching businesses in the hiring  and  employment  of  individuals  with  disabilities and its features can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Wisconsin Act 178: Employment First Bill - 03/29/2018

“An Act to create 47.05 of the statutes; relating to: competitive integrated employment of persons with a disability and granting rule-making authority.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WI Statutes: Vocational Rehabilitation; Specialized Programs for Persons with Disabilities - 08/26/2015

This WI statute defines persons with disabilities and explains Vocational Rehabilitation and “special programs for persons with disabilities.” It states that the State will, “Make vocational rehabilitation services under this chapter available in every county to all persons with disabilities who are present in the state, regardless of residency,” and details the services that will be available to people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Wisconsin SB 21 (Act 55) - 07/12/2015

"Senate Bill 21 as 2015 Wisconsin Act 55 is approved and deposited in the office of the Secretary of State...The following is a brief summary of how this budget, including my vetoes, will continue to make Wisconsin more prosperous, more independent and more efficient...Newly establishes Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) accounts to empower the disabled community and their families to achieve greater independence and assist with various expenses."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Wisconsin Fair Employment Act

Wisconsin's Fair Employment Law gives civil rights protections to qualified persons with disabilities. The law applies to virtually all, private and public employers, regardless of the number of employees. Under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), disability discrimination is also prohibited for employers having 15 or more employees. Both laws are designed to ensure equal opportunity in all aspects of employment.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order 59 Relating to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in State Government - 11/12/2019

“WHEREAS, in Executive Order # 1, I charged the executive branch with developing policies and practices aimed at preventing discrimination, sexual harassment, or harassment of any individual on the basis of age, race, religion, ethnicity, disability, sex, physical condition, developmental disability, military or veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, marital or familial status, genetic information, or political affiliation; and

WHEREAS, equity and inclusion shall be the guiding principles and core values for every state workplace, program, activity, service, contract, and decision.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 05/01/2020

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR within 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Wisconsin Long Term Care Functional Screen Instructions - 06/03/2019

~~“For an individual who is employed, the screener is asked to select the setting or settings where the person works. If the person is working in a facility-based setting, the screener must ask if the person is interested in working in the community.  When making a selection for an employment setting, screeners should ask questions to help the person articulate their preferences. While the person's preference may be difficult to ascertain, screeners are to use their best professional judgment to select the most accurate answer.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Fiscal Practices Manual with Training Activities - 06/01/2019

~~DVR fee schedule rates of payment are determined based upon a competitive pricing analysis and an analysis of DVR costs for these services over aperiod of time not less than one year, but no more than two years. As appropriate, DVR will set rates based upon approved state, county, or federal rates for the same purchased services. If this process is used, it will be specified in the fee schedule services provided under these agreements include:• Customized Employment• Individual Placement and Support (IPS)• Internship/Temporary Work• Job Preparation and Development including Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), JobDevelopment Hire, and Job Retention• Job Shadow• Skills to Pay the Bills• Student Work Based Learning (Pre-ETS)• Supported Employment • Systematic Instruction (Other Than Supported Employment)• Vocational Evaluation• Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI)• Work Incentive Benefits Analysis 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Mental Health: Healthy Living - 05/31/2019

~~“We are working to reduce the impact of mental illnesses on individuals and communities.Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.Positive mental health allows people to:• Realize their full potential• Cope with the stresses of life• Work productively• Make meaningful contributions to their communities”

This page has links to programs that can assist persons with mental health conditions

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Employment First Conference 2019 - 05/15/2019

~~“Continuing On: Strengthening Partnerships for Community LifeThis year’s Employment First conference will provide an intensive, collaborative day of learning and problem solving for service providers, funders, families, and self-advocates who want to transform services to support people with disabilities to build full lives in their communities that include employment, volunteering, recreational, social and other community activities. More about the conference can be found by accessing the weblink.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Housing Assistance Programs - 05/06/2019

~~“This information is an overview of public programs that can offer assistance with renovating and weatherizing existing housing, filling energy needs and obtaining access to public housing and rent assistance.”

This page has links to information on accessibility and ADA compliance for buildings.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Sample IEP Forms Revision - 05/03/2019

~~“we recently released DPI Model Special Education Forms changes for the 2019-20 school year. Updated forms include substantive (district request, law changes, and/or eliminating duplicative information) and non-substantive changes (grammar, pronouns, and/or formatting). Substantive changes were made to the following forms:• R-1 (Referral for special education evaluation);• I-3 (IEP team meeting cover sheet);• I-4 (Linking form);• I-7-A (Participation Guidelines for Alternate Assessment);• I-7-ACCESS (Participation in statewide English language proficiency)” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Extended School Year (ESY) and Permissive Summer School - 05/03/2019

~~“ESY services are required special education and related services provided beyond the limits of the school term, in accordance with the child's IEP, and at no cost to the parents. These services are necessary in order to provide a free appropriate public education (FAPE). If a child needs ESY in order to receive FAPE, such services must be articulated in the child's IEP. If a child does not require ESY services in order to receive FAPE, the IEP should not include the child's participation in permissive summer school classes. For students with disabilities who do not qualify for extended school year services (ESY), districts are required by Section 504 to make reasonable accommodations to enable persons with disabilities to have the opportunity to participate. District must provide reasonable accommodations to give students with disabilities access unless those accommodations would fundamentally alter the nature of the summer programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Facilities Serving People with Developmental Disabilities (FDDs) - 04/30/2019

~~“A Facility Serving People with Developmental Disabilities (FDD) is a residential facility for four or more unrelated persons with developmental disabilities. FDDs are also known as Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID).

FDDs provide treatment to individuals with developmental disabilities to help them maintain and improve their current skills and to develop new skills (e.g., work, social, activities of daily living, education, etc.).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

2017 Wisconsin Act 178: Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment Outcomes - 02/20/2019

~~“2017 Wisconsin Act 178 requires DVR, DHS, and DPI to collaborate, with the input  of stakeholders, in  the  development  of a joint  plan to increase CIE. This plan establishes performance improvement targets, describing specific coordination methods to ensure programs, policies, and procedures support CIE. The Departments will update the plan at least biennially.  As part of the plan, each Department has developed three performance improvement targets and cross-agency objectives to implement collaboratively  to  improve  CIE outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities in the state..”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Wisconsin APSE - 12/11/2018

~~“Our Vision

WI APSE’s vision is for people with disabilities to achieve lives that maximize their potential and foster independence through employment and connection that positively impacts our Wisconsin workforce and communities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Memorandum of Understanding for the Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program - 09/24/2018

“The purpose of this MOU is for the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) and the Department of Children and Families, Division of Family and Economic Security, Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program to establish collaborative efforts regarding their services and to develop a common understanding regarding their roles, policies, and procedures to better serve individuals with disabilities who may benefit from services from both programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin’s Living Well project - 04/30/2018

~~“Project Goals• To improve coordination of consortium partners on community capacity building and community monitoring as evidenced by shared goals, resources, and measurement• To increase the perceived capacity among all five stakeholder groups to self- assess, monitor, report, reduce and/or remediate situations and environments for health, safety and quality of life• To increase the number of communities, organizations, and systems implementing recommended policies and practices• To increase the number of communities, organizations, and systems implementing a comprehensive community monitoring systemTo increase the health, safety, independence, and well-being of people with I/DD as measured by CQL’s 21 quality of life indicators measurement tool between baseline and follow-up measures” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Wisconsin Transition Interagency Agreement - 12/02/2010

This interagency agreement has been revised from the July 2007 interagency agreement to now focus on both students with disabilities transitioning from high school as well as adults with disabilities, who have an expectation for integrated competitive employment. It has also been elaborated for clarity and to reflect best practices associated with increasing employment opportunities for people with cognitive and/or physical disabilities who also have challenges with mental health. Based on recommendations made by a statewide employment task force, this agreement represents the intent to fully coordinate all of the activities and programs within each agency, for every internal and external stakeholder who is striving to achieve employment for citizens with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Interagency Agreement MOU: Adults and Transitioning Youth - 12/02/2010

“This agreement between DPI, DVR, and DHS has four overall priorities supporting integrated employment: To comply with federal legal mandates under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA). To provide practical guidance, technical assistance, and training to internal and external stakeholders and staff regarding employment-related services and supports. To provide information on employment services to individuals with disabilities and their family members or guardians so they will be able to participate fully in employment. To provide clarification of roles of stakeholders within each respective department regarding individuals with disabilities who have identified support needs associated with employment and independent living, so that individuals and their families may regard such efforts to be as seamless, non-duplicative, and as transparent as possible.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Department of Health Services’ Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF): Final Report - 07/18/2008

“Against this backdrop, the Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF) was convened in May 2007 by Division of Long-Term Care Administrator Sinikka Santala and charged with recommending a comprehensive strategy to expand work options for adults who rely on the community-based, long-term care system. The Task Force, composed of 28 members representing a wide range of interests and expertise, analyzed the challenges and identified best practices from Wisconsin and elsewhere for overcoming these challenges.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Committee for people with disability Work plan

The Governor’s Committee for People with Disabilities: • Advises the Governor and state agencies on problems faced by people with disabilities, • Reviews legislation and advises the Governor about legislation affecting people with disabilities, • Suggests to the Governor and state agencies ways to enhance the effective operations of publicity and privately administered or supported programs serving people with disabilities, • Promotes the goal of self-sufficiency for people with disabilities, • Promotes the collection, dissemination and incorporation of adequate information about persons with disabilities into public planning at all levels of government, • Promotes public awareness of needs and abilities of people with disabilities, and • Encourages the effective involvement of people with disabilities in government.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other

Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities

“Transition is helping students with disabilities and their families think about their life after high school and identify long-range goals designing the high school experience to ensure that students gain the skills and connections they need to achieve these goals the provision of funds and services to local school districts to assist in the transition process.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Survival Coalition of Wisconsin Disability Organizations

“The intention of the Wisconsin Employment First Coalition is to partner with people with disabilities, other stakeholders, businesses and the public to increase awareness of the need to provide integrated employment opportunities here in Wisconsin. Survival Coalition supports integrated employment as the presumed outcome for people with disabilities. They believe that everyone can and should work in integrated jobs.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

Wisconsin has an APSE chapter.  “WI APSE believes that a state-wide Employment First effort is a vital component to the goal of increasing employment outcomes for citizens with disabilities in a manner that promotes equality of opportunity…Between May and September 2009, WI APSE facilitated group discussions about employment opportunities in eight locations around the state.” This document is a compilation of their observations, suggestions and next steps to implementing Employment First in Wisconsin.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Wisconsin Employment First Grant Recipients - 09/22/2017

“The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities awarded Employment First Partner grants to 14 community organizations, including: schools, employment providers, managed care organizations, and advocacy organizations.  These organizations will work in their local communities to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Activities will include:  legislative breakfasts, Take Your Legislator to Work visits, business recognition events; leadership mentoring, media campaigns, public service announcements, commercials, community conversations, presentations to local civic groups (e.g., chambers, Rotary clubs) and employer groups, business tours, and business to business mentoring.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

WI Project SEARCH - 07/01/2017

“Project SEARCH is a business led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration. A 9-12 month program, Project SEARCH provides total immersion in a large community business. Students with disabilities are offered a workforce alternative for their last year of high school. All participants must be eligible for services with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). At some sites, young adults who have completed high school may be eligible to participate in Project SEARCH.

The Project SEARCH partnership includes a local high status business, a school, DVR, a vocational services agency and a disability services agency, such as a managed care organization. The business provides an on-site training classroom, business liaison and rotational internships for on the job training. The school provides an instructor. DVR works with a local vocational services agency to supply job coaches who support students in their internships as needed and assist with final job placement. The disability services agency provides follow along services for any eligible student who is hired at the business site or in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2011

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project." Wisconsin received a grant to support their Rural Supported Employment and Peer Support Programs.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

MIG-RATS

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Wisconsin PROMISE Initiative

The PROMISE initiative is intended to improve services for youth SSI (Social Security Supplemental Security Income) recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI.   PROMISE is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Social Security Administration, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. Department of Labor.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Disability Employment Initiative

"The WI Disability Employment Initiative was designed to ‘improve the accessibility and accountability of the public workforce development system for individuals with disabilities,’ extending ‘promising practices implemented by disability program navigators.’ Wisconsin’s Disability Employment Initiative will ‘improve coordination and collaboration among employment and training and asset development programs carried out at a state and local level.’ Linking to the ‘Ticket to Work program,’ Wisconsin seeks to build what members of Congress termed ‘effective community partnerships that leverage public and private resources to better serve individuals with disabilities and improve employment outcomes.’”  The grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WI Partnerships in Employment Systems Change Grant (Let’s Get to Work)

~~“The Wisconsin Let’s Get to Work project was a five-year, national systems change grant seeking to improve community employment outcomes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities in transition.

Manitowoc’s Jobs First Campaign Kick OffFunded by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities the project focused on improving, developing and implementing policies and practices that raise community expectations and overall employment outcomes for youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 10/01/2019

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence. All DVR services must be provided in competitive wage and integrated settings.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind”—rural and urban residents; ethnic or racial minorities; young adults; hourly and variable/seasonal-wage workers; those unaware of or without sufficient coverage options; retail workers; those re-entering from previous incarceration; and self employed individuals.. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Northwest Wisconsin Concentrated Economic Program, Inc. (NWCEP), African-American Men’s Health Education Center, Centro Hispano, Foundation for Black Women’s Wellness.  They will partner with Rapid Response Team, Transitional jobs program, VITA sites, Centro Hispano, Local barber shops, Black Women's Wellness Coalition, Boys and Girls Club, and Wisconsin Job Centers  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:llison EspesethPhone: (608) 890-4784Email: aehales@wisc.edu

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DPI distributes $1.9 billion to Wisconsin schools - 06/17/2019

~~“The department used $2.3 million in flexible federal funds to bolster $9.4 million in state allocations for this aid program. In addition, Special Education Transition Incentive Grants totaling $3.0 million went to 360 school districts and independent charter schools, in proportion to the number of their graduates with disabilities who were in successful employment or education one year after graduation. Finally, the department sent $1.8 million in Supplemental Special Education Aid to 11 small school districts where special education costs were high relative to district revenue.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Transition Readiness Grant Application Evidence-Based Practices Fund - 02/01/2019

~~“The Transition Readiness Grant program was established in FY 19 to assist districts and charter schools   under   Wis.   Stat. § 118.40(2r) and (2x) in   expanding   capacity   to   provide   transition   services   for   pupils   with   disabilities.   School   districts   and   charter   schools   under   Wis.   Stat.   § 118.40(2r) and (2x) are eligible to compete for funding for FY 20 that supports evidence-based practices related to successful transition from high school to beyond for students with IEPs. More about the $1.5 million Transition Readiness Grant Program can be found by accessing the weblink. Million- fund  will  support  ”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WISCONSIN Department of Workforce 2018 STATE OF WISCONSIN ANNUAL REPORT “Veteran Outreach” - 12/18/2018

~~“DWD's Office of Veterans Employment Services (OVES), in partnership with the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation and the Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), participated in a national campaign to promote Wisconsin as a top state for veterans and their spouses to locate after ending their military service. DWD and partner agencies participated in three transition summits and related events, which attracted more than 3,200 attendees. Nearly half of all veterans and spouses that the team interacted with now have active cases with either DVA or OVES, with state staff providing intensive employment services.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation Service Provider Training - 06/13/2018

“Service Provider Personnel are required to complete the technical specification training videos for each of the DVR Statewide Services they will provide to DVR consumers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 05/22/2018

“This year’s Employment First conference is shifting gears to provide an intensive, collaborative day of learning and problem solving for service providers, funders, and self-advocates who want to transform services to support people with disabilities to build full lives in their communities that include employment, volunteering, recreational, social and other community activities.

Building Full Lives is a specific set of support strategies that simultaneously teach people with disabilities new skills in their communities, while creating flexible supports that allow people to fully participate in opportunities of their choosing.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • WIOA

Transition Action Guide For Post-School Planning - 04/17/2017

~~“This Technical Assistance Guide (TAG) was developed to assist in the improvement of communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. It was designed to be useful for all persons and agencies (stakeholders) involved in the transition process.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Self-Employment Toolkit V2.0 - 12/19/2013

“This toolkit was developed to assist DVR staff and consumers through the self-employment process. It addresses all areas of the process, from how to start the initial conversation with the consumer, through opening the business and closing the case successfully. The process outlined in this toolkit is in a 12-step format. Each step has a purpose and should be completed prior to moving on to the next step. It is expected that this process will be followed for all start-up self-employment cases.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation: Customized Self-Employment Toolkit - 08/01/2012

“This tool has been developed to assist DVR Staff throughout the exploration and development of a small business for consumers who need a customized or supported approach to self-employment. A consumer requiring a customized approach may need supports to develop and/or maintain the business. Supports could include: long term job coaching supports, ongoing case management, peer supports, natural supports, family supports or ongoing paid professional services for the business, etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Children's Long-Term Support Waiver Program Amendment Number:WI.0414.R03.02 - 07/01/2019

~~“Per the terms of a corrective action plan (CAP) required by CMS, Wisconsin has developed a uniform statewide rate-setting methodology for most CLTS waiver services. The following waiver services are subject to a statewide rate schedule:•     Adult family home•     Child care•     Community integration services•     Counseling and therapeutic services•     Daily living skills training•     Day services•     Financial management services•     Mentoring•     Nursing services•     Respite•     Support and service coordination•     Supported employment•     Supportive home care•     Transportation” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration - 05/16/2019

~~“Wisconsin received a federal award for a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration. The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

This page has links to information on the program

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Settings Rule: FAQs - 02/20/2019

~~“The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) has received numerous questions concerning the Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS) waivers settings rule. These FAQs provide guidance on the requirements in the settings rule. More information can be found by accessing the web link ”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct) - 08/02/2018

~~The IRIS program is a Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver for self-directed long-term supports. The program is an option for adults with long-term care needs. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Division of Medicaid Services (DMS), Office of IRIS Management under the authorization of the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services (CMS) is responsible for oversight of the IRIS program.

IRIS is available to Wisconsin residents determined financially eligible for Medicaid, functionally in need of nursing home or Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) level of care; and living in a county where managed long-term care and IRIS are available. People who are eligible have the choice of IRIS or managed care through their local Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 08/01/2018

~~“This webpage shares key information related to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) final rule for Medicaid home and community-based services waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Integration Program Ended June 30, 2018 - 07/06/2018

~~“he Community Integration Program (CIP) was replaced by the Family Care, Family Care Partnership, and IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct) programs on July 1, 2018. For more information, contact the aging and disability resource center in your area.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Family Care Program - 07/05/2018

~~"The Family Care Partnership Program is an integrated health and long-term care program for frail elderly and people with disabilities. The Partnership Program consists of several managed care organizations located in different geographical regions of Wisconsin. A program similar to Partnership is the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Statewide Transition Plan (Medicaid)

The Department of Health Services (DHS) intends to transition the Community Recovery Services (CRS) program currently operating under the 1915(i) authority to a 1905(a) State Plan authority effective January 1, 2015, pending CMS approval. The DHS has issued a public notice regarding this transition under the Wisconsin State Register published November 15, 2014. If CMS does not approve the transition of the CRS program from a 1915(i) to a 1905(a) State Plan service, then DHS agrees to follow the statewide transition plan for Medicaid HCBS as outlined in this plan.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The motto of Wisconsin is "Forward," and it's clear to see that things are moving forward on Employment First initiatives that are empowering individuals with disabilities to find success in the careers they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Wisconsin’sVR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
5,813,568
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
322,172
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
135,105
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0%
Change from
2017 to 2018
41.94%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.22%
Change from
2017 to 2018
82.82%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 5,778,709 5,795,483 5,813,568
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 344,120 339,267 322,172
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 143,726 142,285 135,105
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,612,737 2,626,044 2,639,521
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.77% 41.94% 41.94%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.20% 82.64% 82.82%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.10% 3.30% 3.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.50% 19.80% 18.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.70% 10.20% 10.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 341,711 338,197 329,596
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 344,422 339,752 337,608
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 589,836 585,250 578,526
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 49,835 49,861 45,920
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 35,451 32,245 32,092
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,209 7,651 8,267
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,819 9,655 9,448
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 158
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 16,677 16,668 16,669
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 11,342 8,728 8,216

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 11,140 11,105 10,886
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.80% 9.80% 9.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 160,929 160,916 158,502

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 3,604 4,133 5,143
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,961 5,637 7,157
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 15,352 15,267 17,702
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.50% 27.10% 29.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.60% 3.90% 4.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.20% 2.80% 3.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 12.20% 14.10% 11.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 5.30% 4.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 864 1,140 1,461
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 752 816 1,070
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,126 4,065 3,866
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 977 1,534 1,515

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 17,223 15,934 16,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 106 100 118
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 70 77 87
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 66.00% 77.00% 74.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.22 1.33 1.51

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
8,374
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 192 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 617 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,506 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,476 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,029 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 553 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.90% 32.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8,850 8,545 8,582
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 238,092 240,149 238,790
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 439 340 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 632 485 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $23,873,000 $25,398,000 $25,579,423
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $48,800,000 $46,586,000 $44,051,379
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $82,849,000 $86,652,000 $88,228,569
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,102,000 $9,677,000 $10,384,821
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 19.00% 20.00% 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,110 3,288 3,275
Number of people served in facility based work. 7,243 7,083 6,733
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 8,170 8,471 8,637
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 55.80 56.90 58.49

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.22% 67.39% 68.94%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.16% 8.84% 8.48%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.50% 1.43% 1.44%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.83% 99.93% 99.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.44% 28.40% 27.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.39% 71.12% 68.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.05% 83.15% 81.95%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.95% 42.72% 40.45%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,759,088
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 269,729
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,118,183
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,387,912
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 410
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 862
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,272
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,894,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $16,572,273

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 4 2 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 62 67 59
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 5 4 2
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 71 73 61
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 5 3 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6,253 6,321 4,918
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 301 299 205
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6,559 6,623 5,123

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

SES does include use of the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery. (Page 165) Title I

Customized Employment services can be used if an individual has not been successful utilizing SES.SES in Wisconsin utilize a consumer centered resource team. This team includes the DVR consumer, DVR staff, the Supported Employment service provider, the special education or other teacher, long-term support career planner, the guardian or anyone else the consumer chooses to invite. (Page 169) Title I

Changes to SES are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long-term care system and DVR's service provider network.

The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and several internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2016, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys regarding service capacity for SES services. In addition, focus groups were conducted with WRC of providers to discuss SES services and barriers in providing services including expansion to underserved areas. (Page 206) Title IV

o Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long-term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. (Page 211) Title IV

o DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county-based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee-for-service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community-based SES and LTES in lieu of center-based extended employment. (Pages 212-213) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 3: Utilize evidence-based practices that advance the employment of individuals with the most significant disabilities needed additional supports. SES will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery. Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

DVR achieved this goal. Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long-term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. (Page 226) Title IV

501. DVR staff is also involved with the planning and provision of supported employment training including customized employment in collaboration with the Wisconsin PROMISE Grant. (Page 233) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~DVR developed an agreement with DHS, Division of Long Term Care with guidelines for making determinations of payment for service for common customers. The agreement is intended to provide clarification of funding responsibilities for adults seeking competitive employment who may also require short-term employment supports through DVR and long-term employment supports through the Family Care system. This agreement defines and guides practice and provides a structure to coordinate service planning, appropriately blend and braid funding and to resolve disputes. The agreement will be updated prior to the next state plan submission to reflect WIOA requirements. (Page 150) Title I

Programmatic Goal 6: DVR will collaborate with other partners, most importantly long-term care services, to provide a braided approach to working with individuals with the most significant disabilities needing additional employment supports.

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including IPS (via Medicaid waiver approved funds).The Division of Long Term Care within DHS uses a Managed Care approach to provide employment services to individuals with developmental and physical disabilities.

DVR conducts regular collaborative meetings and activity with sources of long-term support including managed care organizations, self-directed managed care and county programs to facilitate referrals, service coordination and increase outcomes. (Page 205) Title IV

o DVR will additionally work more closely with the long-term care community to assist co-enrolled adults who seek integrated work opportunities in the community. Braiding services and offering an array of funded services will help disabled individuals achieve successful outcomes, providing immense opportunities for both the long-term care and DVR consumers. DVR has established an on-going and collaborative relationship with various groups to facilitate communication and coordination of services to mutual consumers. This collaboration has included cross-training, local outreach, common policy instruction. DVR has also implemented enhanced data collection to better track outcomes and successful closure information within the DVR case management system. (Page 213) Title IV

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. The TAG is the tool that is used to help make those braided funding decisions. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services. Staff of all three potential funding sources (DVR, DPI and DHS) are trained in the use of this decision-making process outlined in the TAG. (Page 218) Title IV.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Wisconsin's participation in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) has positioned the state well for continued physical and programmatic compliance. As a "Round Two" DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed a 3-year, $2,330,000 demonstration project, which was designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource support improved the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6-month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post-DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin by:
• Ensuring accessibility in all 11 WDAs 
   o Pilot areas:
        WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues.
   o Control areas:
        All five control WDAs were offered the opportunity for ADA inspections, which resulted in the completion of eight inspections in three WDAs;
        All five control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI, which resulted in nine Job Centers in four WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, specialized keyboards, etc. 
   o All WDAs:
         49 job centers have identical set up of new computers, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology (AT) equipment. (Pages 81-82) Title I

The cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include:
• 1,637 job center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals' external to the Job Centers;
• 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration's Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks; 
• 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period; 
• 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 82) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~DVR is currently focusing on programs that expand financial literacy, job development, youth services, and underserved tribal populations. Each program was created to address specific local needs in respective WDAs. Topics include: banking basics, car purchases, budgeting, understanding credit, employment barriers, online applications, social skills, temporary work experiences, self-advocacy, and obtaining gainful employment. Throughout the year, quarterly reports are due to DVR for review of progress and scope. It is anticipated for these services to transition from I & E funding to fee-for-service agreements upon successful effective completion. DVR has implemented services to potentially eligible around the state. (Page 215) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~DVR renewed non-financial MOU with the University of Wisconsin System and the Wisconsin Technical College System Board. The purpose of the MOU is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of DVR and the Institution of Higher Education in fostering a seamless delivery system supporting the DVR IPE and common customers engaged in training at a post-secondary institution as a means to achieve their employment goal. Included in the MOU is an agreement to coordinate financial aid information so that the DVR consumers can make maximum effort to secure financial aid grants.

Each MOU described above is published on the DVR public website. 

o UW System MOU: https://dwd.wisconsin.gov/dvr/pdf_files/uw_system_mou.pdf 
o Wisconsin Technical College System MOU: https://dwd.wisconsin.gov/dvr/pdf_files/wtcs_mou.pdf   (Page 151) Title IV

DVR is primarily responsible for assuring that services within the Scope of VR Services (34 CFR 361.48) are available to assist eligible individuals with an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in achieving their employment goals.

As needed to assure the timely and continuous provision of IPE services, the agency's financial priority is to expend Title I-B operational and discretionary case aid funds to assure the timely and continuous availability and delivery of services to these individuals over the anticipated term of their service plans. DVR will maintain an IPE obligation reserve to secure the continuous and timely provision of employment plan services. The case aids budget will be dedicated to the continuous and timely support of IPE services and to develop and activate employment plans for eligible individuals with most significant and significant disabilities in a timely manner from the DVR waitlist. (Page 154) Title I

Per DVR policy students with disabilities are recommended to apply for DVR services at least two years prior to graduation. The plan for employment should be developed as soon as possible, but the time shall not exceed 90 days after eligibility for DVR services is determined. DVR staff will use rapid engagement and motivational interviewing techniques when working with this population.

DVR, in collaboration with the local education agency, will provide services to assist the student in developing and successfully achieving their IPE goal. (Page 157) Title I

The DVR Policy Manual states “Transition: For high school students who are eligible for development of a plan for employment, the plan for employment will be completed prior to leaving high school”.

It is understood by all DVR staff working with transition age students that their responsibility is to coordinate with the school’s efforts to engage the student in activities that will allow development of an IPE before the student leaves high school.

The TAG, which is an integral part of the Interagency Agreement, calls for referral of students no later than two years prior to exit from school. This allows time for the necessary career exploration, job shadows, and integrated work experiences leading to the development of an IPE prior to matriculation. DVR assures that the individualized plan for employment is also coordinated with the employment goal in the school’s individualized educational plan and, where appropriate, the individualized service plans of the long-term care service providers. (Page 158) Title I

4.To provide clarification of roles of stakeholders within each respective department regarding individuals with disabilities who have identified support needs associated with employment and independent living, so that individuals and their families may regard such efforts to be as seamless, non-duplicative, and as transparent as possible.

The Interagency Agreement and the TAG describe the role of DVR including the responsibility to provide consultation and technical assistance, referred to as Employment Planning Consultation. The agreement addresses the need for DVR liaisons and staff to provide school districts that have transition students who have not yet applied for VR services with assistance,
strategies and creative ideas for identifying the students’ post-school employment goals, needs for services, and concerns to be addressed in achieving those goals.

DVR staff attends IEP meetings, with consent from the student and family to assist those students, parents and teachers in the development of the transition portion of the IEP. DVR staff can provide information the types of employment services we offer. This provides the opportunity for the IEP to be developed in collaboration and coordination with their IPE. Having a consisted employment goal and coordinated services in the IEP and IPE is important to ensure the student receives the most appropriate and valuable services from both DVR and the LEA. DVR is also available to provide information and technical assistance on transition services to teachers, parents, and other organizations and councils.

As outlined in the TAG and the DVR Policy the development of the plan for employment for students who are eligible for plan development, is to occur prior to the student leaving school. DVR staff and educators are encouraged to coordinate the provision of services and transition activities for students who are eligible for both IEP and an IPE services to assist them in transitioning from school to work. (Pages 159-160) Title I

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services.

The following are general guidelines to help understand how decisions can be made under the DVR/DPI/DHS interagency agreement.
Test 1 - Will the service help to achieve the educational goal of the IEP? If yes, the school is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 2 - Will the service help to achieve the employment goal of the IPE? If yes, DVR is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 3 - If the same service appears on both the IEP and IPE, the school and DVR are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement (conflicts between schools and DVR are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement). (Page 162) Title IV

The current average caseload of total individuals served with an active IPE in Wisconsin is 15,000 individuals. DVR is projecting a possible increase of consumers needing SES. This increase is due to the impact of the provisions in WIOA to serve youth and students and the annual requirement for the DSU to establish contact with workers in a 14 (c) environment. (Page 165) Title IV

DVR has been a partner in efforts to establish the use of an Academic and Career plan for all student in Wisconsin schools including the use of this plan in informing IEP's and IPE's. Through the partnerships, students with the most significant disabilities are participating in competitive, integrated work-related activities will still in high school. This has significantly increased the interest in supported employment services for youth in Wisconsin. Some tools that DVR has developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT -   agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job, job shadows, business tours, job coaching, internship and temporary work, coordinated soft skill training and other employer training with DPI and local school districts while youth are still in high school Once a specific IPE job goal is developed and the youth has obtained employment consistent with the job goal, supported employment services to provide ongoing support, including extended services if needed, will be provided. (Pages 167-168) Title IV

Supported Employment is widely available and is always an available service and outcome for youth. Due to the increased availability of work based learning, and the federally required diversion from 14 (c) employment and paid work options for youth it is expected that there will be many more youth needing SES in Wisconsin. For youth that are interested in supported employment, the Career Profile is provided as part of the comprehensive assessment. The purpose of the career profile is to get information from the consumer and others on the support team. This information will be gathered during interviews. The information for the career profile will be used to help in choosing job or career goal, for job searching and for figuring out how to support the youth on the job. (Page 168) Title IV

(9) Services provided under an IPE will be coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other Federal or State programs;

DVR has a policy in place for the coordination of IEP's and IPE's prior to graduation and prior to that when necessary. In the past, service and treatment plans with long-term care and mental health were coordinated and services identified and funding responsibilities determined. (Page 170) Title IV

DVR has identified 35,000 students in the Wisconsin public school systems that are eligible for VR services. Additionally, through the Promise Grant, we know that over 6,000 youth between the ages of 14-16 are receiving SSI and may or may not have an active IEP. Wisconsin, through its Promise Grant and supported employment experience, believes that targeting outreach to SSI and individuals with the most significant disabilities will allow for strategic niche for needed VR services and collaboration with the schools. DVR will continue to collaborate through the TAG and the active coordination of services with education and long-term care services. DVR continues to coordinate transition services via IEP meetings, transition fairs, collaboration with transition coordinators, and involvement in school/work-related activities under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Page 197) Title IV

DVR is shifting its focus to a student, youth and supported employment model to ensure that the populations targeted for WIOA outreach have access to VR services. DVR has changed policies and fee schedules on transportation and existing business. In addition, DVR has implemented student work based learning technical specifications and fee schedules. (Page 215) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 1: DVR will transition to a youth-focused, most significantly disabled caseload to ensure that all individuals with disabilities who want to work have the opportunity to share their talents with the community and businesses.

DVR achieved this goal by ensuring that every high school in Wisconsin has a DVR liaison assigned and provides outreach to students with disabilities. DVR has a strong collaboration with the Department of Public Instruction and continues to implement the DVR/DPI/DHS Interagency agreement and Transition Action Guide to assist high school's students transition from school to work. DVR is committed to developing and implementing an eligible high school student’s IPE as early as possible during the transition from high school planning process. DVR will develop a student’s IPE prior to graduation. In accordance with the MOU between DVR and DPI, DVR will maintain contact with students and education agencies, attend transition meetings to provide transition planning consultation and technical assistance.

DVR has ensured it has made available Pre-ETS services to both eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities including developing new service technical specifications, such as its new Work Based Learning Services, to meet the service needs of students and youth with disabilities. DVR tracks the number of students it works with to help ensure we are having a youth-focus. (Pages 225-226) Title IV

The IPE for DVR consumers, who select competitive employment in an integrated setting but may require long term employment support, usually begins with an assessment called a career Profile to help determine the employment goal related to the consumer’s interests and strengths. The assessment process may include trial work or other employment explorations to help identify the extent of supports that may be necessary. If needed, the potential source(s) of funding for the long-term employment supports must also be identified. If the source of extended services cannot be identified at the time of implementation of the employment plan, the plan must at least identify the services, activities and/or progress measures designed to identify the nature, type, scope, requirements and source of extended services. The DVR identifies extended services from private nonprofit organization, employers, and other appropriate resources for an individual with a most significant disability transitioning from employment supports provided by the DVR. SES are provided only to those individuals with the most significant disabilities and who, as may be required, have an identified likely source of long term support. (Pages 233-234) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~DVR will continue to consider collaborative agreements with State Agency Departments to target and increase paid OJT internship opportunities for DVR job seekers in state positions.
This initiative is designed to access state limited term employment (LTE) positions to expand the number of state employment opportunities that contribute to the skills and work experience of persons with disabilities served by DVR. The goal of the OJT LTE paid internship is that upon successful completion, DVR sponsored intern will have valuable experience and references for their resume and will be prepared to compete for available LTE or permanent state agency positions. (Page 50) Title I

DVR has been a partner in efforts to establish the use of an Academic and Career plan for all student in Wisconsin schools including the use of this plan in informing IEP's and IPE's. Through the partnerships, students with the most significant disabilities are participating in competitive, integrated work-related activities will still in high school. This has significantly increased the interest in supported employment services for youth in Wisconsin. Some tools that DVR has developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT -   agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job, job shadows, business tours, job coaching, internship and temporary work, coordinated soft skill training and other employer training with DPI and local school districts while youth are still in high school Once a specific IPE job goal is developed and the youth has obtained employment consistent with the job goal, supported employment services to provide ongoing support, including extended services if needed, will be provided. (Pages 167-168) Title IV

Private-sector and state agency employers have benefited significantly from the following DVR OJT initiatives:
o Since Fiscal Year 2016, more than 800 OJT private-sector hires were supported by a 50% payroll cost subsidy for employers providing up to 90 days of OJT following a hire.
o In this same time period, DVR has invested nearly $750,00 for more than 104 DVR job-seekers participating in six-month OJT internships with 23 state agencies and other public entities. (Pages 171-172) Title IV

o DVR will continue to find partnership opportunities with DHS and DPI to continue outreach to youth with the most significant disabilities who may need supported employment. DVR will work with schools to offer work experiences while still in high school, ensuring a more hopeful employment path when reaching adulthood. DVR also developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job. (Page 212) Title IV 

DVR will continue to provide an OJT affirmative hiring initiative to assist employers with the initial cost of training a hired DVR job seeker. DVR area managers train CRP job-placement staff on the use of the OJT initiative. CRP job placement staff is encouraged to use the OJT initiative when they speak to employers about hiring DVR job seekers.  (Page 222) Title IV

o DVR continues to find partnership opportunities with DHS and DPI to continue outreach to transition students who may need supported employment. DVR will work with schools to offer work experiences to transition students while still in high school, ensuring a more hopeful employment path when reaching adulthood. DVR also developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job. DVR utilizes and trains staff to its Interagency agreement and Transition Action Guide between DVR/DPI/DHS to help students transition from school to work successfully. (Page 228) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~• 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration's Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks; (Page 82) Title I

The PROMISE initiative is a research and demonstration project that is intended to improve services for youth Social Security Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI. Wisconsin is one of six sites participating in the demonstration. (Page 175) Title IV

o DVR develop methods to increase consumer awareness of work incentives and Partnership Plus options and evaluate the impact on outcomes for SSI/DI recipients as the WRC recommended through their observation that employment outcomes for SSI/DI recipients appear to have lower earnings and hours than the general VR population.  (Page 192) Title IV

The PROMISE initiative is a research and demonstration project that is intended to improve services for youth Social Security SSI recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school, ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI. Wisconsin is one of six sites participating in the demonstration. (Page 218) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work.

DVR achieved this goal. DVR continues to encourage work incentive benefits counseling for consumers receiving benefits. DVR has technical specifications that are followed and used by our service providers for this service. In SFY 2017 over 3,000 consumers received work incentives benefits counseling. Our counselors also provide guidance and counseling to our consumers on the benefits of work. DVR continues to promote the “Partnership Plus” opportunities in the TTW program. DVR will share information with eligible Ticket holders on post-VR services and supports available through assignment of their Ticket to an approved employment network provider. (Pages 226-227) Title IV

In Wisconsin, supported employment is funded by primarily three sources; DVR Title I-B and long-term funding directed by DHS, Division of Long Term Care (DHS/DLTC) and Division of Care and Treatment Services (DCTS) Funds are managed locally by regional managed care organizations or a self-directed support system known as IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct)) and Managed Care Organizations (MCO's) Mental Health long term supports are managed locally by each county.

To a much lesser extent, Social Security Plans to Achieve Self-Support (PASS) plans, the TTW, natural supports and private party payments have been used to maintain a small number of individuals in long-term supported employment. DVR is promoting the TTW Partnership Plus to ticket holders which has the potential to increase funding for long-term supports. These financial resources enhance the quality, scope, and extent of services proposed under the Title VI plan. (Page 232) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~DVR supports a "dual-customer" approach to service delivery; serving both individuals with disabilities who want to work and the businesses who want to connect to this talent pool. DVR offers services to businesses that include outreach, follow along, and customized services geared toward meeting business needs. DVR Business Services are part of a collaborative workforce solutions system that also includes other state agencies and workforce partners. DVR Business Services team members participate in collaborative training with other business services professionals to ensure a shared understanding of the various programs and services available to business, share best practices, and work toward a consistent service delivery strategy statewide. Business services professionals representing various programs and services serve on a local business services team, and use a shared business relationship (account) management system to effectively communicative activities with businesses in real-time. (Page 30) Title I

DWD's mission: Advancing Wisconsin's economy and business climate by empowering and supporting the workforce. DVR believes this initiative, transitioning the DVR Business Service Consultant (BSC) project positions into permanent positions, best demonstrates a new customer for DVR that fits well with the department's priorities of meeting the workforce needs of Wisconsin's business. DVR fully embraces the dual customer role of serving the workforce needs of Wisconsin's business community while building the needed talent through our DVR job seeker clientele. DVR is the state's preferred talent portal and by having a closer relationship to our business customer, DVR has been able to exceed our employment goal since the BSCs have been part of the DVR service delivery model. (Page 171) Title IV

The BSCs serve to improve business outreach and retention, assisting DWD and DVR meet our state's draft performance measure of Employer Penetration and Retention Rate(s). This enables businesses in Wisconsin to learn about and receive business services DWD and partners can offer. The goal of new businesses receiving services from a DVR BSC is to encourage new business connections and repeat business customers. BSCs are available as technical advisors for: employers on ADA, accommodations and other disability services as described in WIOA; and for their employees developing disabilities throughout their tenure with an employer.

BSCs serve on regional Business Service Teams, coordinating business service(s) with WIOA partners as well as other partner agencies serving business and economic development. This has improved seamless business service delivery to businesses in Wisconsin.

BSCs are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the 7,000 job seekers on DVR caseloads match the skills that are needed by businesses. This allows DVR counselors to spend more time with job seekers who require intensive IPE development and career counseling. (Page 171) Title IV

DVR BSCs are part of the Business Service teams located in each of the 11 WDAs. Along with other workforce partners, the BSCs conduct outreach to businesses to assess needs and share the needs and job openings with all the workforce partners. Wisconsin workforce partners, through a DOL federal grant, developed a common data system that tracks all business contacts and provides all the workforce partners with a common platform of business leads. DVR staff play a significant role in sharing the business needs with other partners and, in turn, have access to other business leads developed by workforce partners. DVR uses JCW Business, along with DET and other partners to collaborative provide business services and dually report the pilot performance measures for WIOA. (Page 172) Title IV

Business Services Focused on Transition and Pre-ETS
Transition and has been a significant focus for DVR, including business services. Project Search Expansion has resulted in increased business connections and BSC outreach to Project Search sites and business partners. The Business Committees required of Project Search sites has further enhanced DVR's relationship with businesses and educating businesses in the value of hiring and retaining people with disabilities. Business Service Consultants are members of Project Search Business Committees and promote internship and hiring practices for students with disabilities.
Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) have expanded our connections with businesses interested in working with and recruiting students. DVR has developed Pre-ETS services that improve our connection with local workforce boards and business connections developed through WIOA partner efforts. DVR, via contracted service providers, have established fee-for-service Pre-ETS services, including job shadows. Job Shadows allow students with disabilities to explore different career opportunities and at the same time expose the business (that is being job shadowed) to future student interns and/or permanent employees. Paid Internships and Job Shadows promoted via business services and WIOA partners have facilitated student job shadows and internships that have resulted in a student permanently hired for his/her first job. (Page 173) Title IV

DVR Business Service Consultants are part of the Business Service teams located in each of the 11 WDAs. Along with other workforce partners, the BSCs conduct outreach to businesses and share the needs and job openings with all the workforce partners. DVR staffs play a significant role in sharing the business needs with other partners and, in turn, have access to other business leads developed by workforce partners. (Page 230) Title IV

An important outcome of listening to business needs includes the development of specialized training programs either with other workforce partners or solely developed with DVR consumers, helping DVR job seekers obtain the needed curriculum instruction, experience and recruitment assistance necessary to meet the talent needs of specific employers. (Page 231) Title IV

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~In 2015, an extensive effort was completed related to examining to the needs of individuals who may need supported employment. DVR examined data provided by DPI, data provided by the Equal Rights Division (administrator of one 14(c) program in Wisconsin), as well as other sources to determine the number of consumers that will potentially need SES required under WIOA. The potential number of students with IEP's needing services is identified at 35,000 and the number of individuals currently served under just one of the 14(c) available subminimum wage certificates is 6,500 individuals. The current average caseload of total individuals served with an active IPE in Wisconsin is 15,000 individuals. DVR is projecting a possible increase of consumers needing SES. This increase is due to the impact of the provisions in WIOA to serve youth and students and the annual requirement for the DSU to establish contact with workers in a 14 (c) environment. (Page 165) Title IV

DVR, working with DPI, DWD-Equal Rights Division who administers the subminimum wage licenses and reviewing federal reports has identified the following targeted opportunities for DVR outreach:
o In-school Youth: Approximately 35,000 students.  
o Subminimum Wage: 6,500 individuals.
o Subminimum Wage and Child Labor Permit (under 18 years): 1,000 youth.
o With this new targeted information, DVR will work with education and long-term care agencies to operationalize new federally mandated requirements to engage in direct outreach to these individuals.
o Individuals on OOS Waiting List - DVR has addressed the waitlist so that in FFY 2015 individuals with a most significant disability will continue to be immediately activated. As of PY 2018, both individuals with a most significant disability and individuals with a significant disability will continue to be immediately activated. DVR anticipates continuing to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities and significant disabilities in PY 2019, with a small amount of NSD in OOS Category Three. (Page 194) Title IV

.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The one-stop delivery system's compliance with Section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the ADA are ensured through the State of Wisconsin's Methods of Administration (MOA), submitted to the US DOL's Civil Rights Center (CRC). Compliance with these provisions are assured through the State's Nondiscrimination Plan, required in the revised Section 188 nondiscrimination and equal opportunity regulations 29 CFR part §38in effect as of January 3, 2017. (Page 80) Title IV

Local EO Officers are required to complete a Section 188 Disability Accessibility Checklist annually as well as conducting physical accessibility reviews of one-stop job centers and affiliate sites to ensure all facilities used in providing program services and activities are accessible to individuals with a disability. Local EO Officers have the option to use the "Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) for the Design, Construction and Alteration of Buildings" or the "ADA Checklist for Existing Facilities" produced by the New England ADA Center to conduct the physical accessibility reviews of facilities.

The DWD-DET EO Officer conducts annual on-site monitoring review visits to local Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) to determine the Board's compliance with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements. During the on-site reviews, the DWD-DET EO Officer meets with the local EO Officer to review all areas of compliance in the local WDB WIOA programs and activities. Walk-through inspections were conducted during the review to confirm comprehensive and affiliate job center sites are physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities. (Page 81) Title I

Vets

Wisconsin's veteran population is a recognized priority in the provision of workforce development services. The state has a proud tradition of effectively transitioning its returning military professionals to civilian employment. There are more than 150,000 veterans of working age (between 18 and 64) in Wisconsin, representing another vital potential workforce resource. The state's age 18-64 veteran population has a labor force participation rate that is roughly the same as the state as a whole (1.7% smaller). The unemployment rate of veterans is lower than that of the overall population (3.4% compared to 4.0% - 2016 American Community Survey). Twenty-eight percent of veterans experience some type of disability, a rate that is more than twice that of the nonveteran population. (Page 21-22) Title I

A strength that the state of Wisconsin uses is the Job Center of Wisconsin (JCW) website which has been enhanced to include matching potential employees to employer job openings. An initiative to hire Veterans has also been implemented using WiscJobsForVets - an initiative to assist Veterans with their work search. (Page 28) Title I

DWD's DET, Office of Veterans Employment Services (OVES) is funded by the DOL Veterans and Training Services, Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG). During Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, OVES will have 41 staff funded by the JVSG grant. DET manages the JVSG from Central Office in Madison where one Director is housed. This individual provides overall guidance, direction, and oversight and reports to Division Leadership. Three JVSG funded supervisors are stationed within three regions of the state and provide day to day supervision of Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) staff. All DVOP or LVER staff are integrated within job centers throughout the state. OVES management staff ensure all LVER and DVOP staff possess knowledge of requirements specified by Title U.S.C. Chapter 31 requirements and guidance provided through DOL Veteran Program letters.

LVERs are fully integrated within the business service teams and conduct employer outreach as members of that team. The sole function of the LVER is business services and interaction with employers. DVOPs are housed at job centers and provide intensive service for veterans that are identified to have a significant barrier to employment (SBE). A pre-screen form is used to determine if veterans meet the definition of a veteran with SBE. Veterans that are determined to be SBE are referred to DVOP staff or other career planners within the job centers. DVOPs provide the intensive services necessary and use a case managed approach to assist veterans with their employment needs. In addition to providing intensive services to SBE veterans that visit the job center, DVOPs conduct outreach to find SBE veterans. DVOPs also provide intensive services for veterans that receive education training funded by the Veterans Administration Chapter 31 program. OVES has a DVOP staff that is an Intensive Service Coordinator. This staff person is located at the Milwaukee Veterans Administration Regional Office and coordinates referrals of Chapter 31 veterans to DVOP and tracks services provided. (Page 30-31) Title I

Veterans requesting employment services complete a pre-screen form that determines if they meet the DOL definition for veteran with a SBE. Any veteran that meets that definition is referred to a DVOP or a job center career planner who will provide intensive services. These services include a comprehensive assessment, and an individualized employment plan. OVES staff work with partner agencies and programs to assure that priority of service is provided to veterans. Working closely with partner agencies assures that there is not duplication of services and that veterans receive all services that they are eligible and qualified to receive. The OVES LVERs are also integrated within the Job Centers and serve as members of the local business services team. LVERs are capacity builders that work with local area employers and community organizations. LVERs promote what veterans bring to the workforce and assist employers by connecting them to qualified veterans. LVERs serve as active participants in each WDA on the business service teams. The OVES' LVER and DVOP staff is integrated within the Job Centers of each of the 11 WDAs. (Page 49) Title I

INTERAGENCY MOU WITH DVR, THE OFFICE OF VETERAN EMPLOYMENT SERVICES WITHIN DWD'S DIVISION OF EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING AND THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF VETERAN'S AFFAIRS (MILWAUKEE REGIONAL OFFICE) The purpose of the MOU is to ensure seamless, coordinated, and effective VR services to Wisconsin's Veterans with disabilities by improving cooperation and collaboration among the three agencies, avoiding duplication of services, improving inter- agency communication and establishing staff cross-training opportunities. (Page 151) Title IV

Two initiatives were included in the Wisconsin Blueprint for Prosperity that will allow DVR to expand place and train opportunities for job seekers with disabilities and Wisconsin businesses. Training Workers with Disabilities Grants, part of the Wisconsin Fast Forward grant initiative, awarded funding to businesses to develop training for high demand jobs in their industries, and to target job seekers with disabilities, including veterans with service-related disabilities, in their recruitment and hiring. (Page 172) Title IV 

Through DWDs statewide and local MOUs with the One-Stop Partners and Job Center network and DVR Workforce Investment Board MOUs, the requirements of 34 CFR Part 361.23(b) are satisfied. DVR also has an agreement with DOL funded Veterans services program to coordinate services for common customers and to deliver quality services for disabled veterans. (Page 223) Title IV

The State of Wisconsin OVES provides services to eligible veterans through a statewide network of DVOP and LVER staff. These services are available in one-stop centers, online, and in various outreach locations. OVES staff work with partner agencies and programs to assure that priority of service is provided to veterans. Working closely with partner agencies assures that there is not duplication of services and that veterans receive all services that they are eligible and qualified to receive. LVERs are members of the local business services team. LVERs also work with employers so that veterans become employed. (Page 249) Title IV

THE DVOP DUTIES, TO THE CASE MANAGED POPULATIONS SERVED, INCLUDE:

o Document and record all activity using the State of Wisconsin approved computer-based case management system. Paper case management folders are used for documents such as DD214s, certifications and Chapter 31 related information.

o Comprehensive assessment to identify barriers, education and skill levels.

o Develop an IEP with the client to identify the strategies to overcome barriers and to find employment. Conduct follow-up to determine progress in achieving employment and adjust the IEP as needed.

o As appropriate, make referrals to other agencies, supportive services, counseling, testing or job search workshops. o Assist in employment seeking activities through preparation of resumes, cover letters and application forms; instruct in use of internet and/or JCW, and access to other materials and information, such as labor market analysis.

o Develop strong linkages with partner agencies to assure that there is an agreed understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the DVOP and partner staff in providing services to veterans.

o Coordinate with LVERs to refer veterans to job openings (Page 250) Title IV

OVES LVER and DVOP staff are located in the one-stop job center/career center network throughout the state of Wisconsin. LVERs are participating members of the job center business service teams. DVOPs partner with WIOA, WP, State VR staff, and other center based partner agencies, to develop employment plans and return veterans to self-sufficiency. Veteran service staff also partner with numerous non-job center based service providers. LVER staff partner with DVA, and the Wisconsin Employment Resource Connection. This partnership provides information on employment and training to active National Guard and National Guard and Reserve units. (Page 251) Title IV

Mental Health

~~DVR has identified sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children's waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment, including natural supports. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long-term support. (Page 169) Title I

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services.

The following are general guidelines to help understand how decisions can be made under the DVR/ DPI/DHS interagency agreement.

Test 1 - Will the service help to achieve the educational goal of the IEP? If yes, the school is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 2 - Will the service help to achieve the employment goal of the IPE? If yes, DVR is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 3 - If the same service appears on both the IEP and IPE, the school and DVR are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement (conflicts between schools and DVR are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement).
Test 4 - If the student is over 18 and eligible for Medicaid long-term care services and supports, and chooses to enroll in a Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health program, the three agencies are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement to determine resources for each individual’s situation. (Conflicts between agencies are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement. (Page 174) Title IV

DVR updated the interagency agreement with the state’s DPI in December of 2010. The agreement also includes DHS, Division of Long Term Care, Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, and Division of Public Health. This agreement describes the roles and responsibilities of the tri-agency state partnership which includes DVR, DPI, and DHS with respect to supports and services to youth-in-transition from high school and adults with disabilities who have an expectation for integrated competitive employment.

DVR has worked with DPI to update this agreement to revise and align with transition-related requirements with the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA. Currently, DVR is awaiting the SEA review and approval to complete final signature updating our agreement from 2010. We expect the agreement will be finalized in calendar year 2018. Once the agreement is assigned and in effect, the agreement is valid beginning on the date of signatures and will continue until it is replaced by a new agreement, terminated upon mutual agreement, or requested in writing by either party. (Page 187) Title IV

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including IPS (via Medicaid waiver approved funds) (Page 205) Title IV

DVR entered into an agreement with DHS to pilot a new comprehensive approach for the provision of supported employment to individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness called IPS. The Wisconsin IPS system change grant partnership with Dartmouth College Community Mental Health Program provides funds for mental health care employment service expansion and technical assistance. As part of the 3-year initiative, DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population. (Page 224) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 90

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 05/01/2020

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR within 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Executive Order 59 Relating to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in State Government - 11/12/2019

“WHEREAS, in Executive Order # 1, I charged the executive branch with developing policies and practices aimed at preventing discrimination, sexual harassment, or harassment of any individual on the basis of age, race, religion, ethnicity, disability, sex, physical condition, developmental disability, military or veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, marital or familial status, genetic information, or political affiliation; and

WHEREAS, equity and inclusion shall be the guiding principles and core values for every state workplace, program, activity, service, contract, and decision.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 10/01/2019

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence. All DVR services must be provided in competitive wage and integrated settings.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind”—rural and urban residents; ethnic or racial minorities; young adults; hourly and variable/seasonal-wage workers; those unaware of or without sufficient coverage options; retail workers; those re-entering from previous incarceration; and self employed individuals.. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Northwest Wisconsin Concentrated Economic Program, Inc. (NWCEP), African-American Men’s Health Education Center, Centro Hispano, Foundation for Black Women’s Wellness.  They will partner with Rapid Response Team, Transitional jobs program, VITA sites, Centro Hispano, Local barber shops, Black Women's Wellness Coalition, Boys and Girls Club, and Wisconsin Job Centers  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:llison EspesethPhone: (608) 890-4784Email: aehales@wisc.edu

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Children's Long-Term Support Waiver Program Amendment Number:WI.0414.R03.02 - 07/01/2019

~~“Per the terms of a corrective action plan (CAP) required by CMS, Wisconsin has developed a uniform statewide rate-setting methodology for most CLTS waiver services. The following waiver services are subject to a statewide rate schedule:•     Adult family home•     Child care•     Community integration services•     Counseling and therapeutic services•     Daily living skills training•     Day services•     Financial management services•     Mentoring•     Nursing services•     Respite•     Support and service coordination•     Supported employment•     Supportive home care•     Transportation” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DPI distributes $1.9 billion to Wisconsin schools - 06/17/2019

~~“The department used $2.3 million in flexible federal funds to bolster $9.4 million in state allocations for this aid program. In addition, Special Education Transition Incentive Grants totaling $3.0 million went to 360 school districts and independent charter schools, in proportion to the number of their graduates with disabilities who were in successful employment or education one year after graduation. Finally, the department sent $1.8 million in Supplemental Special Education Aid to 11 small school districts where special education costs were high relative to district revenue.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Long Term Care Functional Screen Instructions - 06/03/2019

~~“For an individual who is employed, the screener is asked to select the setting or settings where the person works. If the person is working in a facility-based setting, the screener must ask if the person is interested in working in the community.  When making a selection for an employment setting, screeners should ask questions to help the person articulate their preferences. While the person's preference may be difficult to ascertain, screeners are to use their best professional judgment to select the most accurate answer.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Fiscal Practices Manual with Training Activities - 06/01/2019

~~DVR fee schedule rates of payment are determined based upon a competitive pricing analysis and an analysis of DVR costs for these services over aperiod of time not less than one year, but no more than two years. As appropriate, DVR will set rates based upon approved state, county, or federal rates for the same purchased services. If this process is used, it will be specified in the fee schedule services provided under these agreements include:• Customized Employment• Individual Placement and Support (IPS)• Internship/Temporary Work• Job Preparation and Development including Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), JobDevelopment Hire, and Job Retention• Job Shadow• Skills to Pay the Bills• Student Work Based Learning (Pre-ETS)• Supported Employment • Systematic Instruction (Other Than Supported Employment)• Vocational Evaluation• Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI)• Work Incentive Benefits Analysis 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Mental Health: Healthy Living - 05/31/2019

~~“We are working to reduce the impact of mental illnesses on individuals and communities.Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.Positive mental health allows people to:• Realize their full potential• Cope with the stresses of life• Work productively• Make meaningful contributions to their communities”

This page has links to programs that can assist persons with mental health conditions

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration - 05/16/2019

~~“Wisconsin received a federal award for a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration. The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

This page has links to information on the program

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

2017 WISCONSIN ACT 323 - 04/17/2018

~~“COACHING PROGRAM ESTABLISHED.   2017 WISCONSIN ACT 323: AN ACT to amend 20.438 (1) (a); and to create 46.2898 of the statutes; relating to: employment of individuals withdisabilities enrolled in long−term care programs and making an appropriation.  More information about the legislation concerning a model of coaching businesses in the hiring  and  employment  of  individuals  with  disabilities and its features can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Wisconsin Act 178: Employment First Bill - 03/29/2018

“An Act to create 47.05 of the statutes; relating to: competitive integrated employment of persons with a disability and granting rule-making authority.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WI Statutes: Vocational Rehabilitation; Specialized Programs for Persons with Disabilities - 08/26/2015

This WI statute defines persons with disabilities and explains Vocational Rehabilitation and “special programs for persons with disabilities.” It states that the State will, “Make vocational rehabilitation services under this chapter available in every county to all persons with disabilities who are present in the state, regardless of residency,” and details the services that will be available to people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Wisconsin SB 21 (Act 55) - 07/12/2015

"Senate Bill 21 as 2015 Wisconsin Act 55 is approved and deposited in the office of the Secretary of State...The following is a brief summary of how this budget, including my vetoes, will continue to make Wisconsin more prosperous, more independent and more efficient...Newly establishes Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) accounts to empower the disabled community and their families to achieve greater independence and assist with various expenses."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Wisconsin Fair Employment Act

Wisconsin's Fair Employment Law gives civil rights protections to qualified persons with disabilities. The law applies to virtually all, private and public employers, regardless of the number of employees. Under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), disability discrimination is also prohibited for employers having 15 or more employees. Both laws are designed to ensure equal opportunity in all aspects of employment.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order 59 Relating to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in State Government - 11/12/2019

“WHEREAS, in Executive Order # 1, I charged the executive branch with developing policies and practices aimed at preventing discrimination, sexual harassment, or harassment of any individual on the basis of age, race, religion, ethnicity, disability, sex, physical condition, developmental disability, military or veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, marital or familial status, genetic information, or political affiliation; and

WHEREAS, equity and inclusion shall be the guiding principles and core values for every state workplace, program, activity, service, contract, and decision.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 05/01/2020

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR within 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Wisconsin Long Term Care Functional Screen Instructions - 06/03/2019

~~“For an individual who is employed, the screener is asked to select the setting or settings where the person works. If the person is working in a facility-based setting, the screener must ask if the person is interested in working in the community.  When making a selection for an employment setting, screeners should ask questions to help the person articulate their preferences. While the person's preference may be difficult to ascertain, screeners are to use their best professional judgment to select the most accurate answer.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Fiscal Practices Manual with Training Activities - 06/01/2019

~~DVR fee schedule rates of payment are determined based upon a competitive pricing analysis and an analysis of DVR costs for these services over aperiod of time not less than one year, but no more than two years. As appropriate, DVR will set rates based upon approved state, county, or federal rates for the same purchased services. If this process is used, it will be specified in the fee schedule services provided under these agreements include:• Customized Employment• Individual Placement and Support (IPS)• Internship/Temporary Work• Job Preparation and Development including Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), JobDevelopment Hire, and Job Retention• Job Shadow• Skills to Pay the Bills• Student Work Based Learning (Pre-ETS)• Supported Employment • Systematic Instruction (Other Than Supported Employment)• Vocational Evaluation• Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI)• Work Incentive Benefits Analysis 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Mental Health: Healthy Living - 05/31/2019

~~“We are working to reduce the impact of mental illnesses on individuals and communities.Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.Positive mental health allows people to:• Realize their full potential• Cope with the stresses of life• Work productively• Make meaningful contributions to their communities”

This page has links to programs that can assist persons with mental health conditions

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Employment First Conference 2019 - 05/15/2019

~~“Continuing On: Strengthening Partnerships for Community LifeThis year’s Employment First conference will provide an intensive, collaborative day of learning and problem solving for service providers, funders, families, and self-advocates who want to transform services to support people with disabilities to build full lives in their communities that include employment, volunteering, recreational, social and other community activities. More about the conference can be found by accessing the weblink.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Housing Assistance Programs - 05/06/2019

~~“This information is an overview of public programs that can offer assistance with renovating and weatherizing existing housing, filling energy needs and obtaining access to public housing and rent assistance.”

This page has links to information on accessibility and ADA compliance for buildings.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Sample IEP Forms Revision - 05/03/2019

~~“we recently released DPI Model Special Education Forms changes for the 2019-20 school year. Updated forms include substantive (district request, law changes, and/or eliminating duplicative information) and non-substantive changes (grammar, pronouns, and/or formatting). Substantive changes were made to the following forms:• R-1 (Referral for special education evaluation);• I-3 (IEP team meeting cover sheet);• I-4 (Linking form);• I-7-A (Participation Guidelines for Alternate Assessment);• I-7-ACCESS (Participation in statewide English language proficiency)” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Extended School Year (ESY) and Permissive Summer School - 05/03/2019

~~“ESY services are required special education and related services provided beyond the limits of the school term, in accordance with the child's IEP, and at no cost to the parents. These services are necessary in order to provide a free appropriate public education (FAPE). If a child needs ESY in order to receive FAPE, such services must be articulated in the child's IEP. If a child does not require ESY services in order to receive FAPE, the IEP should not include the child's participation in permissive summer school classes. For students with disabilities who do not qualify for extended school year services (ESY), districts are required by Section 504 to make reasonable accommodations to enable persons with disabilities to have the opportunity to participate. District must provide reasonable accommodations to give students with disabilities access unless those accommodations would fundamentally alter the nature of the summer programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Facilities Serving People with Developmental Disabilities (FDDs) - 04/30/2019

~~“A Facility Serving People with Developmental Disabilities (FDD) is a residential facility for four or more unrelated persons with developmental disabilities. FDDs are also known as Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID).

FDDs provide treatment to individuals with developmental disabilities to help them maintain and improve their current skills and to develop new skills (e.g., work, social, activities of daily living, education, etc.).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

2017 Wisconsin Act 178: Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment Outcomes - 02/20/2019

~~“2017 Wisconsin Act 178 requires DVR, DHS, and DPI to collaborate, with the input  of stakeholders, in  the  development  of a joint  plan to increase CIE. This plan establishes performance improvement targets, describing specific coordination methods to ensure programs, policies, and procedures support CIE. The Departments will update the plan at least biennially.  As part of the plan, each Department has developed three performance improvement targets and cross-agency objectives to implement collaboratively  to  improve  CIE outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities in the state..”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Wisconsin APSE - 12/11/2018

~~“Our Vision

WI APSE’s vision is for people with disabilities to achieve lives that maximize their potential and foster independence through employment and connection that positively impacts our Wisconsin workforce and communities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Memorandum of Understanding for the Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program - 09/24/2018

“The purpose of this MOU is for the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) and the Department of Children and Families, Division of Family and Economic Security, Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program to establish collaborative efforts regarding their services and to develop a common understanding regarding their roles, policies, and procedures to better serve individuals with disabilities who may benefit from services from both programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin’s Living Well project - 04/30/2018

~~“Project Goals• To improve coordination of consortium partners on community capacity building and community monitoring as evidenced by shared goals, resources, and measurement• To increase the perceived capacity among all five stakeholder groups to self- assess, monitor, report, reduce and/or remediate situations and environments for health, safety and quality of life• To increase the number of communities, organizations, and systems implementing recommended policies and practices• To increase the number of communities, organizations, and systems implementing a comprehensive community monitoring systemTo increase the health, safety, independence, and well-being of people with I/DD as measured by CQL’s 21 quality of life indicators measurement tool between baseline and follow-up measures” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Wisconsin Transition Interagency Agreement - 12/02/2010

This interagency agreement has been revised from the July 2007 interagency agreement to now focus on both students with disabilities transitioning from high school as well as adults with disabilities, who have an expectation for integrated competitive employment. It has also been elaborated for clarity and to reflect best practices associated with increasing employment opportunities for people with cognitive and/or physical disabilities who also have challenges with mental health. Based on recommendations made by a statewide employment task force, this agreement represents the intent to fully coordinate all of the activities and programs within each agency, for every internal and external stakeholder who is striving to achieve employment for citizens with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Interagency Agreement MOU: Adults and Transitioning Youth - 12/02/2010

“This agreement between DPI, DVR, and DHS has four overall priorities supporting integrated employment: To comply with federal legal mandates under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA). To provide practical guidance, technical assistance, and training to internal and external stakeholders and staff regarding employment-related services and supports. To provide information on employment services to individuals with disabilities and their family members or guardians so they will be able to participate fully in employment. To provide clarification of roles of stakeholders within each respective department regarding individuals with disabilities who have identified support needs associated with employment and independent living, so that individuals and their families may regard such efforts to be as seamless, non-duplicative, and as transparent as possible.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Department of Health Services’ Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF): Final Report - 07/18/2008

“Against this backdrop, the Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF) was convened in May 2007 by Division of Long-Term Care Administrator Sinikka Santala and charged with recommending a comprehensive strategy to expand work options for adults who rely on the community-based, long-term care system. The Task Force, composed of 28 members representing a wide range of interests and expertise, analyzed the challenges and identified best practices from Wisconsin and elsewhere for overcoming these challenges.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Committee for people with disability Work plan

The Governor’s Committee for People with Disabilities: • Advises the Governor and state agencies on problems faced by people with disabilities, • Reviews legislation and advises the Governor about legislation affecting people with disabilities, • Suggests to the Governor and state agencies ways to enhance the effective operations of publicity and privately administered or supported programs serving people with disabilities, • Promotes the goal of self-sufficiency for people with disabilities, • Promotes the collection, dissemination and incorporation of adequate information about persons with disabilities into public planning at all levels of government, • Promotes public awareness of needs and abilities of people with disabilities, and • Encourages the effective involvement of people with disabilities in government.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other

Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities

“Transition is helping students with disabilities and their families think about their life after high school and identify long-range goals designing the high school experience to ensure that students gain the skills and connections they need to achieve these goals the provision of funds and services to local school districts to assist in the transition process.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Survival Coalition of Wisconsin Disability Organizations

“The intention of the Wisconsin Employment First Coalition is to partner with people with disabilities, other stakeholders, businesses and the public to increase awareness of the need to provide integrated employment opportunities here in Wisconsin. Survival Coalition supports integrated employment as the presumed outcome for people with disabilities. They believe that everyone can and should work in integrated jobs.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

Wisconsin has an APSE chapter.  “WI APSE believes that a state-wide Employment First effort is a vital component to the goal of increasing employment outcomes for citizens with disabilities in a manner that promotes equality of opportunity…Between May and September 2009, WI APSE facilitated group discussions about employment opportunities in eight locations around the state.” This document is a compilation of their observations, suggestions and next steps to implementing Employment First in Wisconsin.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Wisconsin Employment First Grant Recipients - 09/22/2017

“The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities awarded Employment First Partner grants to 14 community organizations, including: schools, employment providers, managed care organizations, and advocacy organizations.  These organizations will work in their local communities to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Activities will include:  legislative breakfasts, Take Your Legislator to Work visits, business recognition events; leadership mentoring, media campaigns, public service announcements, commercials, community conversations, presentations to local civic groups (e.g., chambers, Rotary clubs) and employer groups, business tours, and business to business mentoring.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

WI Project SEARCH - 07/01/2017

“Project SEARCH is a business led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration. A 9-12 month program, Project SEARCH provides total immersion in a large community business. Students with disabilities are offered a workforce alternative for their last year of high school. All participants must be eligible for services with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). At some sites, young adults who have completed high school may be eligible to participate in Project SEARCH.

The Project SEARCH partnership includes a local high status business, a school, DVR, a vocational services agency and a disability services agency, such as a managed care organization. The business provides an on-site training classroom, business liaison and rotational internships for on the job training. The school provides an instructor. DVR works with a local vocational services agency to supply job coaches who support students in their internships as needed and assist with final job placement. The disability services agency provides follow along services for any eligible student who is hired at the business site or in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2011

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project." Wisconsin received a grant to support their Rural Supported Employment and Peer Support Programs.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

MIG-RATS

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Wisconsin PROMISE Initiative

The PROMISE initiative is intended to improve services for youth SSI (Social Security Supplemental Security Income) recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI.   PROMISE is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Social Security Administration, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. Department of Labor.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Disability Employment Initiative

"The WI Disability Employment Initiative was designed to ‘improve the accessibility and accountability of the public workforce development system for individuals with disabilities,’ extending ‘promising practices implemented by disability program navigators.’ Wisconsin’s Disability Employment Initiative will ‘improve coordination and collaboration among employment and training and asset development programs carried out at a state and local level.’ Linking to the ‘Ticket to Work program,’ Wisconsin seeks to build what members of Congress termed ‘effective community partnerships that leverage public and private resources to better serve individuals with disabilities and improve employment outcomes.’”  The grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WI Partnerships in Employment Systems Change Grant (Let’s Get to Work)

~~“The Wisconsin Let’s Get to Work project was a five-year, national systems change grant seeking to improve community employment outcomes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities in transition.

Manitowoc’s Jobs First Campaign Kick OffFunded by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities the project focused on improving, developing and implementing policies and practices that raise community expectations and overall employment outcomes for youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 10/01/2019

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence. All DVR services must be provided in competitive wage and integrated settings.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind”—rural and urban residents; ethnic or racial minorities; young adults; hourly and variable/seasonal-wage workers; those unaware of or without sufficient coverage options; retail workers; those re-entering from previous incarceration; and self employed individuals.. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Northwest Wisconsin Concentrated Economic Program, Inc. (NWCEP), African-American Men’s Health Education Center, Centro Hispano, Foundation for Black Women’s Wellness.  They will partner with Rapid Response Team, Transitional jobs program, VITA sites, Centro Hispano, Local barber shops, Black Women's Wellness Coalition, Boys and Girls Club, and Wisconsin Job Centers  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:llison EspesethPhone: (608) 890-4784Email: aehales@wisc.edu

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DPI distributes $1.9 billion to Wisconsin schools - 06/17/2019

~~“The department used $2.3 million in flexible federal funds to bolster $9.4 million in state allocations for this aid program. In addition, Special Education Transition Incentive Grants totaling $3.0 million went to 360 school districts and independent charter schools, in proportion to the number of their graduates with disabilities who were in successful employment or education one year after graduation. Finally, the department sent $1.8 million in Supplemental Special Education Aid to 11 small school districts where special education costs were high relative to district revenue.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Transition Readiness Grant Application Evidence-Based Practices Fund - 02/01/2019

~~“The Transition Readiness Grant program was established in FY 19 to assist districts and charter schools   under   Wis.   Stat. § 118.40(2r) and (2x) in   expanding   capacity   to   provide   transition   services   for   pupils   with   disabilities.   School   districts   and   charter   schools   under   Wis.   Stat.   § 118.40(2r) and (2x) are eligible to compete for funding for FY 20 that supports evidence-based practices related to successful transition from high school to beyond for students with IEPs. More about the $1.5 million Transition Readiness Grant Program can be found by accessing the weblink. Million- fund  will  support  ”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WISCONSIN Department of Workforce 2018 STATE OF WISCONSIN ANNUAL REPORT “Veteran Outreach” - 12/18/2018

~~“DWD's Office of Veterans Employment Services (OVES), in partnership with the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation and the Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), participated in a national campaign to promote Wisconsin as a top state for veterans and their spouses to locate after ending their military service. DWD and partner agencies participated in three transition summits and related events, which attracted more than 3,200 attendees. Nearly half of all veterans and spouses that the team interacted with now have active cases with either DVA or OVES, with state staff providing intensive employment services.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation Service Provider Training - 06/13/2018

“Service Provider Personnel are required to complete the technical specification training videos for each of the DVR Statewide Services they will provide to DVR consumers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 05/22/2018

“This year’s Employment First conference is shifting gears to provide an intensive, collaborative day of learning and problem solving for service providers, funders, and self-advocates who want to transform services to support people with disabilities to build full lives in their communities that include employment, volunteering, recreational, social and other community activities.

Building Full Lives is a specific set of support strategies that simultaneously teach people with disabilities new skills in their communities, while creating flexible supports that allow people to fully participate in opportunities of their choosing.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • WIOA

Transition Action Guide For Post-School Planning - 04/17/2017

~~“This Technical Assistance Guide (TAG) was developed to assist in the improvement of communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. It was designed to be useful for all persons and agencies (stakeholders) involved in the transition process.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Self-Employment Toolkit V2.0 - 12/19/2013

“This toolkit was developed to assist DVR staff and consumers through the self-employment process. It addresses all areas of the process, from how to start the initial conversation with the consumer, through opening the business and closing the case successfully. The process outlined in this toolkit is in a 12-step format. Each step has a purpose and should be completed prior to moving on to the next step. It is expected that this process will be followed for all start-up self-employment cases.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation: Customized Self-Employment Toolkit - 08/01/2012

“This tool has been developed to assist DVR Staff throughout the exploration and development of a small business for consumers who need a customized or supported approach to self-employment. A consumer requiring a customized approach may need supports to develop and/or maintain the business. Supports could include: long term job coaching supports, ongoing case management, peer supports, natural supports, family supports or ongoing paid professional services for the business, etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Children's Long-Term Support Waiver Program Amendment Number:WI.0414.R03.02 - 07/01/2019

~~“Per the terms of a corrective action plan (CAP) required by CMS, Wisconsin has developed a uniform statewide rate-setting methodology for most CLTS waiver services. The following waiver services are subject to a statewide rate schedule:•     Adult family home•     Child care•     Community integration services•     Counseling and therapeutic services•     Daily living skills training•     Day services•     Financial management services•     Mentoring•     Nursing services•     Respite•     Support and service coordination•     Supported employment•     Supportive home care•     Transportation” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration - 05/16/2019

~~“Wisconsin received a federal award for a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration. The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

This page has links to information on the program

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Settings Rule: FAQs - 02/20/2019

~~“The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) has received numerous questions concerning the Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS) waivers settings rule. These FAQs provide guidance on the requirements in the settings rule. More information can be found by accessing the web link ”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct) - 08/02/2018

~~The IRIS program is a Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver for self-directed long-term supports. The program is an option for adults with long-term care needs. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Division of Medicaid Services (DMS), Office of IRIS Management under the authorization of the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services (CMS) is responsible for oversight of the IRIS program.

IRIS is available to Wisconsin residents determined financially eligible for Medicaid, functionally in need of nursing home or Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) level of care; and living in a county where managed long-term care and IRIS are available. People who are eligible have the choice of IRIS or managed care through their local Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 08/01/2018

~~“This webpage shares key information related to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) final rule for Medicaid home and community-based services waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Integration Program Ended June 30, 2018 - 07/06/2018

~~“he Community Integration Program (CIP) was replaced by the Family Care, Family Care Partnership, and IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct) programs on July 1, 2018. For more information, contact the aging and disability resource center in your area.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Family Care Program - 07/05/2018

~~"The Family Care Partnership Program is an integrated health and long-term care program for frail elderly and people with disabilities. The Partnership Program consists of several managed care organizations located in different geographical regions of Wisconsin. A program similar to Partnership is the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Statewide Transition Plan (Medicaid)

The Department of Health Services (DHS) intends to transition the Community Recovery Services (CRS) program currently operating under the 1915(i) authority to a 1905(a) State Plan authority effective January 1, 2015, pending CMS approval. The DHS has issued a public notice regarding this transition under the Wisconsin State Register published November 15, 2014. If CMS does not approve the transition of the CRS program from a 1915(i) to a 1905(a) State Plan service, then DHS agrees to follow the statewide transition plan for Medicaid HCBS as outlined in this plan.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The motto of Wisconsin is "Forward," and it's clear to see that things are moving forward on Employment First initiatives that are empowering individuals with disabilities to find success in the careers they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Wisconsin’sVR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
5,813,568
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
322,172
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
135,105
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0%
Change from
2017 to 2018
41.94%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.22%
Change from
2017 to 2018
82.82%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 5,813,568
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 322,172
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 135,105
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,639,521
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.94%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.82%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 329,596
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 337,608
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 578,526
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 45,920
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 32,092
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 8,267
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 9,448
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 158
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 16,669
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 8,216

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 10,886
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 158,502

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,143
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 7,157
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 17,702
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 29.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 11.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 4.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,461
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,070
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,866
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,515

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 16,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 118
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 87
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 74.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.51

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8,582
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 238,790
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $25,579,423
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $44,051,379
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $88,228,569
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,384,821
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,275
Number of people served in facility based work. 6,733
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 8,637
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 58.49

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.94%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.48%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.44%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 27.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.95%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 40.45%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,759,088
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 269,729
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,118,183
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,387,912
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 410
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 862
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,272
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,894,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $16,572,273

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 59
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 61
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4,918
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 205
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 5,123

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

SES does include use of the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery. (Page 165) Title I

Customized Employment services can be used if an individual has not been successful utilizing SES.SES in Wisconsin utilize a consumer centered resource team. This team includes the DVR consumer, DVR staff, the Supported Employment service provider, the special education or other teacher, long-term support career planner, the guardian or anyone else the consumer chooses to invite. (Page 169) Title I

Changes to SES are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long-term care system and DVR's service provider network.

The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and several internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2016, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys regarding service capacity for SES services. In addition, focus groups were conducted with WRC of providers to discuss SES services and barriers in providing services including expansion to underserved areas. (Page 206) Title IV

o Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long-term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. (Page 211) Title IV

o DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county-based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee-for-service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community-based SES and LTES in lieu of center-based extended employment. (Pages 212-213) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 3: Utilize evidence-based practices that advance the employment of individuals with the most significant disabilities needed additional supports. SES will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery. Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

DVR achieved this goal. Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long-term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. (Page 226) Title IV

501. DVR staff is also involved with the planning and provision of supported employment training including customized employment in collaboration with the Wisconsin PROMISE Grant. (Page 233) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~DVR developed an agreement with DHS, Division of Long Term Care with guidelines for making determinations of payment for service for common customers. The agreement is intended to provide clarification of funding responsibilities for adults seeking competitive employment who may also require short-term employment supports through DVR and long-term employment supports through the Family Care system. This agreement defines and guides practice and provides a structure to coordinate service planning, appropriately blend and braid funding and to resolve disputes. The agreement will be updated prior to the next state plan submission to reflect WIOA requirements. (Page 150) Title I

Programmatic Goal 6: DVR will collaborate with other partners, most importantly long-term care services, to provide a braided approach to working with individuals with the most significant disabilities needing additional employment supports.

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including IPS (via Medicaid waiver approved funds).The Division of Long Term Care within DHS uses a Managed Care approach to provide employment services to individuals with developmental and physical disabilities.

DVR conducts regular collaborative meetings and activity with sources of long-term support including managed care organizations, self-directed managed care and county programs to facilitate referrals, service coordination and increase outcomes. (Page 205) Title IV

o DVR will additionally work more closely with the long-term care community to assist co-enrolled adults who seek integrated work opportunities in the community. Braiding services and offering an array of funded services will help disabled individuals achieve successful outcomes, providing immense opportunities for both the long-term care and DVR consumers. DVR has established an on-going and collaborative relationship with various groups to facilitate communication and coordination of services to mutual consumers. This collaboration has included cross-training, local outreach, common policy instruction. DVR has also implemented enhanced data collection to better track outcomes and successful closure information within the DVR case management system. (Page 213) Title IV

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. The TAG is the tool that is used to help make those braided funding decisions. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services. Staff of all three potential funding sources (DVR, DPI and DHS) are trained in the use of this decision-making process outlined in the TAG. (Page 218) Title IV.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Wisconsin's participation in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) has positioned the state well for continued physical and programmatic compliance. As a "Round Two" DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed a 3-year, $2,330,000 demonstration project, which was designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource support improved the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6-month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post-DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin by:
• Ensuring accessibility in all 11 WDAs 
   o Pilot areas:
        WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues.
   o Control areas:
        All five control WDAs were offered the opportunity for ADA inspections, which resulted in the completion of eight inspections in three WDAs;
        All five control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI, which resulted in nine Job Centers in four WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, specialized keyboards, etc. 
   o All WDAs:
         49 job centers have identical set up of new computers, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology (AT) equipment. (Pages 81-82) Title I

The cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include:
• 1,637 job center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals' external to the Job Centers;
• 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration's Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks; 
• 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period; 
• 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 82) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~DVR is currently focusing on programs that expand financial literacy, job development, youth services, and underserved tribal populations. Each program was created to address specific local needs in respective WDAs. Topics include: banking basics, car purchases, budgeting, understanding credit, employment barriers, online applications, social skills, temporary work experiences, self-advocacy, and obtaining gainful employment. Throughout the year, quarterly reports are due to DVR for review of progress and scope. It is anticipated for these services to transition from I & E funding to fee-for-service agreements upon successful effective completion. DVR has implemented services to potentially eligible around the state. (Page 215) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~DVR renewed non-financial MOU with the University of Wisconsin System and the Wisconsin Technical College System Board. The purpose of the MOU is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of DVR and the Institution of Higher Education in fostering a seamless delivery system supporting the DVR IPE and common customers engaged in training at a post-secondary institution as a means to achieve their employment goal. Included in the MOU is an agreement to coordinate financial aid information so that the DVR consumers can make maximum effort to secure financial aid grants.

Each MOU described above is published on the DVR public website. 

o UW System MOU: https://dwd.wisconsin.gov/dvr/pdf_files/uw_system_mou.pdf 
o Wisconsin Technical College System MOU: https://dwd.wisconsin.gov/dvr/pdf_files/wtcs_mou.pdf   (Page 151) Title IV

DVR is primarily responsible for assuring that services within the Scope of VR Services (34 CFR 361.48) are available to assist eligible individuals with an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in achieving their employment goals.

As needed to assure the timely and continuous provision of IPE services, the agency's financial priority is to expend Title I-B operational and discretionary case aid funds to assure the timely and continuous availability and delivery of services to these individuals over the anticipated term of their service plans. DVR will maintain an IPE obligation reserve to secure the continuous and timely provision of employment plan services. The case aids budget will be dedicated to the continuous and timely support of IPE services and to develop and activate employment plans for eligible individuals with most significant and significant disabilities in a timely manner from the DVR waitlist. (Page 154) Title I

Per DVR policy students with disabilities are recommended to apply for DVR services at least two years prior to graduation. The plan for employment should be developed as soon as possible, but the time shall not exceed 90 days after eligibility for DVR services is determined. DVR staff will use rapid engagement and motivational interviewing techniques when working with this population.

DVR, in collaboration with the local education agency, will provide services to assist the student in developing and successfully achieving their IPE goal. (Page 157) Title I

The DVR Policy Manual states “Transition: For high school students who are eligible for development of a plan for employment, the plan for employment will be completed prior to leaving high school”.

It is understood by all DVR staff working with transition age students that their responsibility is to coordinate with the school’s efforts to engage the student in activities that will allow development of an IPE before the student leaves high school.

The TAG, which is an integral part of the Interagency Agreement, calls for referral of students no later than two years prior to exit from school. This allows time for the necessary career exploration, job shadows, and integrated work experiences leading to the development of an IPE prior to matriculation. DVR assures that the individualized plan for employment is also coordinated with the employment goal in the school’s individualized educational plan and, where appropriate, the individualized service plans of the long-term care service providers. (Page 158) Title I

4.To provide clarification of roles of stakeholders within each respective department regarding individuals with disabilities who have identified support needs associated with employment and independent living, so that individuals and their families may regard such efforts to be as seamless, non-duplicative, and as transparent as possible.

The Interagency Agreement and the TAG describe the role of DVR including the responsibility to provide consultation and technical assistance, referred to as Employment Planning Consultation. The agreement addresses the need for DVR liaisons and staff to provide school districts that have transition students who have not yet applied for VR services with assistance,
strategies and creative ideas for identifying the students’ post-school employment goals, needs for services, and concerns to be addressed in achieving those goals.

DVR staff attends IEP meetings, with consent from the student and family to assist those students, parents and teachers in the development of the transition portion of the IEP. DVR staff can provide information the types of employment services we offer. This provides the opportunity for the IEP to be developed in collaboration and coordination with their IPE. Having a consisted employment goal and coordinated services in the IEP and IPE is important to ensure the student receives the most appropriate and valuable services from both DVR and the LEA. DVR is also available to provide information and technical assistance on transition services to teachers, parents, and other organizations and councils.

As outlined in the TAG and the DVR Policy the development of the plan for employment for students who are eligible for plan development, is to occur prior to the student leaving school. DVR staff and educators are encouraged to coordinate the provision of services and transition activities for students who are eligible for both IEP and an IPE services to assist them in transitioning from school to work. (Pages 159-160) Title I

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services.

The following are general guidelines to help understand how decisions can be made under the DVR/DPI/DHS interagency agreement.
Test 1 - Will the service help to achieve the educational goal of the IEP? If yes, the school is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 2 - Will the service help to achieve the employment goal of the IPE? If yes, DVR is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 3 - If the same service appears on both the IEP and IPE, the school and DVR are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement (conflicts between schools and DVR are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement). (Page 162) Title IV

The current average caseload of total individuals served with an active IPE in Wisconsin is 15,000 individuals. DVR is projecting a possible increase of consumers needing SES. This increase is due to the impact of the provisions in WIOA to serve youth and students and the annual requirement for the DSU to establish contact with workers in a 14 (c) environment. (Page 165) Title IV

DVR has been a partner in efforts to establish the use of an Academic and Career plan for all student in Wisconsin schools including the use of this plan in informing IEP's and IPE's. Through the partnerships, students with the most significant disabilities are participating in competitive, integrated work-related activities will still in high school. This has significantly increased the interest in supported employment services for youth in Wisconsin. Some tools that DVR has developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT -   agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job, job shadows, business tours, job coaching, internship and temporary work, coordinated soft skill training and other employer training with DPI and local school districts while youth are still in high school Once a specific IPE job goal is developed and the youth has obtained employment consistent with the job goal, supported employment services to provide ongoing support, including extended services if needed, will be provided. (Pages 167-168) Title IV

Supported Employment is widely available and is always an available service and outcome for youth. Due to the increased availability of work based learning, and the federally required diversion from 14 (c) employment and paid work options for youth it is expected that there will be many more youth needing SES in Wisconsin. For youth that are interested in supported employment, the Career Profile is provided as part of the comprehensive assessment. The purpose of the career profile is to get information from the consumer and others on the support team. This information will be gathered during interviews. The information for the career profile will be used to help in choosing job or career goal, for job searching and for figuring out how to support the youth on the job. (Page 168) Title IV

(9) Services provided under an IPE will be coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other Federal or State programs;

DVR has a policy in place for the coordination of IEP's and IPE's prior to graduation and prior to that when necessary. In the past, service and treatment plans with long-term care and mental health were coordinated and services identified and funding responsibilities determined. (Page 170) Title IV

DVR has identified 35,000 students in the Wisconsin public school systems that are eligible for VR services. Additionally, through the Promise Grant, we know that over 6,000 youth between the ages of 14-16 are receiving SSI and may or may not have an active IEP. Wisconsin, through its Promise Grant and supported employment experience, believes that targeting outreach to SSI and individuals with the most significant disabilities will allow for strategic niche for needed VR services and collaboration with the schools. DVR will continue to collaborate through the TAG and the active coordination of services with education and long-term care services. DVR continues to coordinate transition services via IEP meetings, transition fairs, collaboration with transition coordinators, and involvement in school/work-related activities under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Page 197) Title IV

DVR is shifting its focus to a student, youth and supported employment model to ensure that the populations targeted for WIOA outreach have access to VR services. DVR has changed policies and fee schedules on transportation and existing business. In addition, DVR has implemented student work based learning technical specifications and fee schedules. (Page 215) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 1: DVR will transition to a youth-focused, most significantly disabled caseload to ensure that all individuals with disabilities who want to work have the opportunity to share their talents with the community and businesses.

DVR achieved this goal by ensuring that every high school in Wisconsin has a DVR liaison assigned and provides outreach to students with disabilities. DVR has a strong collaboration with the Department of Public Instruction and continues to implement the DVR/DPI/DHS Interagency agreement and Transition Action Guide to assist high school's students transition from school to work. DVR is committed to developing and implementing an eligible high school student’s IPE as early as possible during the transition from high school planning process. DVR will develop a student’s IPE prior to graduation. In accordance with the MOU between DVR and DPI, DVR will maintain contact with students and education agencies, attend transition meetings to provide transition planning consultation and technical assistance.

DVR has ensured it has made available Pre-ETS services to both eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities including developing new service technical specifications, such as its new Work Based Learning Services, to meet the service needs of students and youth with disabilities. DVR tracks the number of students it works with to help ensure we are having a youth-focus. (Pages 225-226) Title IV

The IPE for DVR consumers, who select competitive employment in an integrated setting but may require long term employment support, usually begins with an assessment called a career Profile to help determine the employment goal related to the consumer’s interests and strengths. The assessment process may include trial work or other employment explorations to help identify the extent of supports that may be necessary. If needed, the potential source(s) of funding for the long-term employment supports must also be identified. If the source of extended services cannot be identified at the time of implementation of the employment plan, the plan must at least identify the services, activities and/or progress measures designed to identify the nature, type, scope, requirements and source of extended services. The DVR identifies extended services from private nonprofit organization, employers, and other appropriate resources for an individual with a most significant disability transitioning from employment supports provided by the DVR. SES are provided only to those individuals with the most significant disabilities and who, as may be required, have an identified likely source of long term support. (Pages 233-234) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~DVR will continue to consider collaborative agreements with State Agency Departments to target and increase paid OJT internship opportunities for DVR job seekers in state positions.
This initiative is designed to access state limited term employment (LTE) positions to expand the number of state employment opportunities that contribute to the skills and work experience of persons with disabilities served by DVR. The goal of the OJT LTE paid internship is that upon successful completion, DVR sponsored intern will have valuable experience and references for their resume and will be prepared to compete for available LTE or permanent state agency positions. (Page 50) Title I

DVR has been a partner in efforts to establish the use of an Academic and Career plan for all student in Wisconsin schools including the use of this plan in informing IEP's and IPE's. Through the partnerships, students with the most significant disabilities are participating in competitive, integrated work-related activities will still in high school. This has significantly increased the interest in supported employment services for youth in Wisconsin. Some tools that DVR has developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT -   agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job, job shadows, business tours, job coaching, internship and temporary work, coordinated soft skill training and other employer training with DPI and local school districts while youth are still in high school Once a specific IPE job goal is developed and the youth has obtained employment consistent with the job goal, supported employment services to provide ongoing support, including extended services if needed, will be provided. (Pages 167-168) Title IV

Private-sector and state agency employers have benefited significantly from the following DVR OJT initiatives:
o Since Fiscal Year 2016, more than 800 OJT private-sector hires were supported by a 50% payroll cost subsidy for employers providing up to 90 days of OJT following a hire.
o In this same time period, DVR has invested nearly $750,00 for more than 104 DVR job-seekers participating in six-month OJT internships with 23 state agencies and other public entities. (Pages 171-172) Title IV

o DVR will continue to find partnership opportunities with DHS and DPI to continue outreach to youth with the most significant disabilities who may need supported employment. DVR will work with schools to offer work experiences while still in high school, ensuring a more hopeful employment path when reaching adulthood. DVR also developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job. (Page 212) Title IV 

DVR will continue to provide an OJT affirmative hiring initiative to assist employers with the initial cost of training a hired DVR job seeker. DVR area managers train CRP job-placement staff on the use of the OJT initiative. CRP job placement staff is encouraged to use the OJT initiative when they speak to employers about hiring DVR job seekers.  (Page 222) Title IV

o DVR continues to find partnership opportunities with DHS and DPI to continue outreach to transition students who may need supported employment. DVR will work with schools to offer work experiences to transition students while still in high school, ensuring a more hopeful employment path when reaching adulthood. DVR also developed and will continue to utilize a Youth OJT agreement to assist an employer in associated costs of training a youth in a job. DVR utilizes and trains staff to its Interagency agreement and Transition Action Guide between DVR/DPI/DHS to help students transition from school to work successfully. (Page 228) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~• 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration's Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks; (Page 82) Title I

The PROMISE initiative is a research and demonstration project that is intended to improve services for youth Social Security Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI. Wisconsin is one of six sites participating in the demonstration. (Page 175) Title IV

o DVR develop methods to increase consumer awareness of work incentives and Partnership Plus options and evaluate the impact on outcomes for SSI/DI recipients as the WRC recommended through their observation that employment outcomes for SSI/DI recipients appear to have lower earnings and hours than the general VR population.  (Page 192) Title IV

The PROMISE initiative is a research and demonstration project that is intended to improve services for youth Social Security SSI recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school, ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI. Wisconsin is one of six sites participating in the demonstration. (Page 218) Title IV

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work.

DVR achieved this goal. DVR continues to encourage work incentive benefits counseling for consumers receiving benefits. DVR has technical specifications that are followed and used by our service providers for this service. In SFY 2017 over 3,000 consumers received work incentives benefits counseling. Our counselors also provide guidance and counseling to our consumers on the benefits of work. DVR continues to promote the “Partnership Plus” opportunities in the TTW program. DVR will share information with eligible Ticket holders on post-VR services and supports available through assignment of their Ticket to an approved employment network provider. (Pages 226-227) Title IV

In Wisconsin, supported employment is funded by primarily three sources; DVR Title I-B and long-term funding directed by DHS, Division of Long Term Care (DHS/DLTC) and Division of Care and Treatment Services (DCTS) Funds are managed locally by regional managed care organizations or a self-directed support system known as IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct)) and Managed Care Organizations (MCO's) Mental Health long term supports are managed locally by each county.

To a much lesser extent, Social Security Plans to Achieve Self-Support (PASS) plans, the TTW, natural supports and private party payments have been used to maintain a small number of individuals in long-term supported employment. DVR is promoting the TTW Partnership Plus to ticket holders which has the potential to increase funding for long-term supports. These financial resources enhance the quality, scope, and extent of services proposed under the Title VI plan. (Page 232) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~DVR supports a "dual-customer" approach to service delivery; serving both individuals with disabilities who want to work and the businesses who want to connect to this talent pool. DVR offers services to businesses that include outreach, follow along, and customized services geared toward meeting business needs. DVR Business Services are part of a collaborative workforce solutions system that also includes other state agencies and workforce partners. DVR Business Services team members participate in collaborative training with other business services professionals to ensure a shared understanding of the various programs and services available to business, share best practices, and work toward a consistent service delivery strategy statewide. Business services professionals representing various programs and services serve on a local business services team, and use a shared business relationship (account) management system to effectively communicative activities with businesses in real-time. (Page 30) Title I

DWD's mission: Advancing Wisconsin's economy and business climate by empowering and supporting the workforce. DVR believes this initiative, transitioning the DVR Business Service Consultant (BSC) project positions into permanent positions, best demonstrates a new customer for DVR that fits well with the department's priorities of meeting the workforce needs of Wisconsin's business. DVR fully embraces the dual customer role of serving the workforce needs of Wisconsin's business community while building the needed talent through our DVR job seeker clientele. DVR is the state's preferred talent portal and by having a closer relationship to our business customer, DVR has been able to exceed our employment goal since the BSCs have been part of the DVR service delivery model. (Page 171) Title IV

The BSCs serve to improve business outreach and retention, assisting DWD and DVR meet our state's draft performance measure of Employer Penetration and Retention Rate(s). This enables businesses in Wisconsin to learn about and receive business services DWD and partners can offer. The goal of new businesses receiving services from a DVR BSC is to encourage new business connections and repeat business customers. BSCs are available as technical advisors for: employers on ADA, accommodations and other disability services as described in WIOA; and for their employees developing disabilities throughout their tenure with an employer.

BSCs serve on regional Business Service Teams, coordinating business service(s) with WIOA partners as well as other partner agencies serving business and economic development. This has improved seamless business service delivery to businesses in Wisconsin.

BSCs are able to work with businesses to determine if any of the 7,000 job seekers on DVR caseloads match the skills that are needed by businesses. This allows DVR counselors to spend more time with job seekers who require intensive IPE development and career counseling. (Page 171) Title IV

DVR BSCs are part of the Business Service teams located in each of the 11 WDAs. Along with other workforce partners, the BSCs conduct outreach to businesses to assess needs and share the needs and job openings with all the workforce partners. Wisconsin workforce partners, through a DOL federal grant, developed a common data system that tracks all business contacts and provides all the workforce partners with a common platform of business leads. DVR staff play a significant role in sharing the business needs with other partners and, in turn, have access to other business leads developed by workforce partners. DVR uses JCW Business, along with DET and other partners to collaborative provide business services and dually report the pilot performance measures for WIOA. (Page 172) Title IV

Business Services Focused on Transition and Pre-ETS
Transition and has been a significant focus for DVR, including business services. Project Search Expansion has resulted in increased business connections and BSC outreach to Project Search sites and business partners. The Business Committees required of Project Search sites has further enhanced DVR's relationship with businesses and educating businesses in the value of hiring and retaining people with disabilities. Business Service Consultants are members of Project Search Business Committees and promote internship and hiring practices for students with disabilities.
Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) have expanded our connections with businesses interested in working with and recruiting students. DVR has developed Pre-ETS services that improve our connection with local workforce boards and business connections developed through WIOA partner efforts. DVR, via contracted service providers, have established fee-for-service Pre-ETS services, including job shadows. Job Shadows allow students with disabilities to explore different career opportunities and at the same time expose the business (that is being job shadowed) to future student interns and/or permanent employees. Paid Internships and Job Shadows promoted via business services and WIOA partners have facilitated student job shadows and internships that have resulted in a student permanently hired for his/her first job. (Page 173) Title IV

DVR Business Service Consultants are part of the Business Service teams located in each of the 11 WDAs. Along with other workforce partners, the BSCs conduct outreach to businesses and share the needs and job openings with all the workforce partners. DVR staffs play a significant role in sharing the business needs with other partners and, in turn, have access to other business leads developed by workforce partners. (Page 230) Title IV

An important outcome of listening to business needs includes the development of specialized training programs either with other workforce partners or solely developed with DVR consumers, helping DVR job seekers obtain the needed curriculum instruction, experience and recruitment assistance necessary to meet the talent needs of specific employers. (Page 231) Title IV

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~In 2015, an extensive effort was completed related to examining to the needs of individuals who may need supported employment. DVR examined data provided by DPI, data provided by the Equal Rights Division (administrator of one 14(c) program in Wisconsin), as well as other sources to determine the number of consumers that will potentially need SES required under WIOA. The potential number of students with IEP's needing services is identified at 35,000 and the number of individuals currently served under just one of the 14(c) available subminimum wage certificates is 6,500 individuals. The current average caseload of total individuals served with an active IPE in Wisconsin is 15,000 individuals. DVR is projecting a possible increase of consumers needing SES. This increase is due to the impact of the provisions in WIOA to serve youth and students and the annual requirement for the DSU to establish contact with workers in a 14 (c) environment. (Page 165) Title IV

DVR, working with DPI, DWD-Equal Rights Division who administers the subminimum wage licenses and reviewing federal reports has identified the following targeted opportunities for DVR outreach:
o In-school Youth: Approximately 35,000 students.  
o Subminimum Wage: 6,500 individuals.
o Subminimum Wage and Child Labor Permit (under 18 years): 1,000 youth.
o With this new targeted information, DVR will work with education and long-term care agencies to operationalize new federally mandated requirements to engage in direct outreach to these individuals.
o Individuals on OOS Waiting List - DVR has addressed the waitlist so that in FFY 2015 individuals with a most significant disability will continue to be immediately activated. As of PY 2018, both individuals with a most significant disability and individuals with a significant disability will continue to be immediately activated. DVR anticipates continuing to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities and significant disabilities in PY 2019, with a small amount of NSD in OOS Category Three. (Page 194) Title IV

.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The one-stop delivery system's compliance with Section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the ADA are ensured through the State of Wisconsin's Methods of Administration (MOA), submitted to the US DOL's Civil Rights Center (CRC). Compliance with these provisions are assured through the State's Nondiscrimination Plan, required in the revised Section 188 nondiscrimination and equal opportunity regulations 29 CFR part §38in effect as of January 3, 2017. (Page 80) Title IV

Local EO Officers are required to complete a Section 188 Disability Accessibility Checklist annually as well as conducting physical accessibility reviews of one-stop job centers and affiliate sites to ensure all facilities used in providing program services and activities are accessible to individuals with a disability. Local EO Officers have the option to use the "Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) for the Design, Construction and Alteration of Buildings" or the "ADA Checklist for Existing Facilities" produced by the New England ADA Center to conduct the physical accessibility reviews of facilities.

The DWD-DET EO Officer conducts annual on-site monitoring review visits to local Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) to determine the Board's compliance with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements. During the on-site reviews, the DWD-DET EO Officer meets with the local EO Officer to review all areas of compliance in the local WDB WIOA programs and activities. Walk-through inspections were conducted during the review to confirm comprehensive and affiliate job center sites are physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities. (Page 81) Title I

Vets

Wisconsin's veteran population is a recognized priority in the provision of workforce development services. The state has a proud tradition of effectively transitioning its returning military professionals to civilian employment. There are more than 150,000 veterans of working age (between 18 and 64) in Wisconsin, representing another vital potential workforce resource. The state's age 18-64 veteran population has a labor force participation rate that is roughly the same as the state as a whole (1.7% smaller). The unemployment rate of veterans is lower than that of the overall population (3.4% compared to 4.0% - 2016 American Community Survey). Twenty-eight percent of veterans experience some type of disability, a rate that is more than twice that of the nonveteran population. (Page 21-22) Title I

A strength that the state of Wisconsin uses is the Job Center of Wisconsin (JCW) website which has been enhanced to include matching potential employees to employer job openings. An initiative to hire Veterans has also been implemented using WiscJobsForVets - an initiative to assist Veterans with their work search. (Page 28) Title I

DWD's DET, Office of Veterans Employment Services (OVES) is funded by the DOL Veterans and Training Services, Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG). During Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, OVES will have 41 staff funded by the JVSG grant. DET manages the JVSG from Central Office in Madison where one Director is housed. This individual provides overall guidance, direction, and oversight and reports to Division Leadership. Three JVSG funded supervisors are stationed within three regions of the state and provide day to day supervision of Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) staff. All DVOP or LVER staff are integrated within job centers throughout the state. OVES management staff ensure all LVER and DVOP staff possess knowledge of requirements specified by Title U.S.C. Chapter 31 requirements and guidance provided through DOL Veteran Program letters.

LVERs are fully integrated within the business service teams and conduct employer outreach as members of that team. The sole function of the LVER is business services and interaction with employers. DVOPs are housed at job centers and provide intensive service for veterans that are identified to have a significant barrier to employment (SBE). A pre-screen form is used to determine if veterans meet the definition of a veteran with SBE. Veterans that are determined to be SBE are referred to DVOP staff or other career planners within the job centers. DVOPs provide the intensive services necessary and use a case managed approach to assist veterans with their employment needs. In addition to providing intensive services to SBE veterans that visit the job center, DVOPs conduct outreach to find SBE veterans. DVOPs also provide intensive services for veterans that receive education training funded by the Veterans Administration Chapter 31 program. OVES has a DVOP staff that is an Intensive Service Coordinator. This staff person is located at the Milwaukee Veterans Administration Regional Office and coordinates referrals of Chapter 31 veterans to DVOP and tracks services provided. (Page 30-31) Title I

Veterans requesting employment services complete a pre-screen form that determines if they meet the DOL definition for veteran with a SBE. Any veteran that meets that definition is referred to a DVOP or a job center career planner who will provide intensive services. These services include a comprehensive assessment, and an individualized employment plan. OVES staff work with partner agencies and programs to assure that priority of service is provided to veterans. Working closely with partner agencies assures that there is not duplication of services and that veterans receive all services that they are eligible and qualified to receive. The OVES LVERs are also integrated within the Job Centers and serve as members of the local business services team. LVERs are capacity builders that work with local area employers and community organizations. LVERs promote what veterans bring to the workforce and assist employers by connecting them to qualified veterans. LVERs serve as active participants in each WDA on the business service teams. The OVES' LVER and DVOP staff is integrated within the Job Centers of each of the 11 WDAs. (Page 49) Title I

INTERAGENCY MOU WITH DVR, THE OFFICE OF VETERAN EMPLOYMENT SERVICES WITHIN DWD'S DIVISION OF EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING AND THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF VETERAN'S AFFAIRS (MILWAUKEE REGIONAL OFFICE) The purpose of the MOU is to ensure seamless, coordinated, and effective VR services to Wisconsin's Veterans with disabilities by improving cooperation and collaboration among the three agencies, avoiding duplication of services, improving inter- agency communication and establishing staff cross-training opportunities. (Page 151) Title IV

Two initiatives were included in the Wisconsin Blueprint for Prosperity that will allow DVR to expand place and train opportunities for job seekers with disabilities and Wisconsin businesses. Training Workers with Disabilities Grants, part of the Wisconsin Fast Forward grant initiative, awarded funding to businesses to develop training for high demand jobs in their industries, and to target job seekers with disabilities, including veterans with service-related disabilities, in their recruitment and hiring. (Page 172) Title IV 

Through DWDs statewide and local MOUs with the One-Stop Partners and Job Center network and DVR Workforce Investment Board MOUs, the requirements of 34 CFR Part 361.23(b) are satisfied. DVR also has an agreement with DOL funded Veterans services program to coordinate services for common customers and to deliver quality services for disabled veterans. (Page 223) Title IV

The State of Wisconsin OVES provides services to eligible veterans through a statewide network of DVOP and LVER staff. These services are available in one-stop centers, online, and in various outreach locations. OVES staff work with partner agencies and programs to assure that priority of service is provided to veterans. Working closely with partner agencies assures that there is not duplication of services and that veterans receive all services that they are eligible and qualified to receive. LVERs are members of the local business services team. LVERs also work with employers so that veterans become employed. (Page 249) Title IV

THE DVOP DUTIES, TO THE CASE MANAGED POPULATIONS SERVED, INCLUDE:

o Document and record all activity using the State of Wisconsin approved computer-based case management system. Paper case management folders are used for documents such as DD214s, certifications and Chapter 31 related information.

o Comprehensive assessment to identify barriers, education and skill levels.

o Develop an IEP with the client to identify the strategies to overcome barriers and to find employment. Conduct follow-up to determine progress in achieving employment and adjust the IEP as needed.

o As appropriate, make referrals to other agencies, supportive services, counseling, testing or job search workshops. o Assist in employment seeking activities through preparation of resumes, cover letters and application forms; instruct in use of internet and/or JCW, and access to other materials and information, such as labor market analysis.

o Develop strong linkages with partner agencies to assure that there is an agreed understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the DVOP and partner staff in providing services to veterans.

o Coordinate with LVERs to refer veterans to job openings (Page 250) Title IV

OVES LVER and DVOP staff are located in the one-stop job center/career center network throughout the state of Wisconsin. LVERs are participating members of the job center business service teams. DVOPs partner with WIOA, WP, State VR staff, and other center based partner agencies, to develop employment plans and return veterans to self-sufficiency. Veteran service staff also partner with numerous non-job center based service providers. LVER staff partner with DVA, and the Wisconsin Employment Resource Connection. This partnership provides information on employment and training to active National Guard and National Guard and Reserve units. (Page 251) Title IV

Mental Health

~~DVR has identified sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children's waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment, including natural supports. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long-term support. (Page 169) Title I

When there is overlap of educational goals and employment/rehabilitation goals and services, a cost sharing arrangement may be negotiated between DVR, the school district, and Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health programs. To know who will pay for a service, all parties must be involved in transition planning in order to make a determination about appropriate services.

The following are general guidelines to help understand how decisions can be made under the DVR/ DPI/DHS interagency agreement.

Test 1 - Will the service help to achieve the educational goal of the IEP? If yes, the school is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 2 - Will the service help to achieve the employment goal of the IPE? If yes, DVR is primarily responsible for the service.
Test 3 - If the same service appears on both the IEP and IPE, the school and DVR are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement (conflicts between schools and DVR are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement).
Test 4 - If the student is over 18 and eligible for Medicaid long-term care services and supports, and chooses to enroll in a Long-Term Care and/or Mental Health program, the three agencies are responsible for negotiating a cost sharing arrangement to determine resources for each individual’s situation. (Conflicts between agencies are to be resolved utilizing the process outlined in the DPI/DVR/DHS Interagency Agreement. (Page 174) Title IV

DVR updated the interagency agreement with the state’s DPI in December of 2010. The agreement also includes DHS, Division of Long Term Care, Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, and Division of Public Health. This agreement describes the roles and responsibilities of the tri-agency state partnership which includes DVR, DPI, and DHS with respect to supports and services to youth-in-transition from high school and adults with disabilities who have an expectation for integrated competitive employment.

DVR has worked with DPI to update this agreement to revise and align with transition-related requirements with the Rehabilitation Act, as amended by WIOA. Currently, DVR is awaiting the SEA review and approval to complete final signature updating our agreement from 2010. We expect the agreement will be finalized in calendar year 2018. Once the agreement is assigned and in effect, the agreement is valid beginning on the date of signatures and will continue until it is replaced by a new agreement, terminated upon mutual agreement, or requested in writing by either party. (Page 187) Title IV

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with DHS to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to SES as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including IPS (via Medicaid waiver approved funds) (Page 205) Title IV

DVR entered into an agreement with DHS to pilot a new comprehensive approach for the provision of supported employment to individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness called IPS. The Wisconsin IPS system change grant partnership with Dartmouth College Community Mental Health Program provides funds for mental health care employment service expansion and technical assistance. As part of the 3-year initiative, DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population. (Page 224) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 90

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 05/01/2020

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR within 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Executive Order 59 Relating to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in State Government - 11/12/2019

“WHEREAS, in Executive Order # 1, I charged the executive branch with developing policies and practices aimed at preventing discrimination, sexual harassment, or harassment of any individual on the basis of age, race, religion, ethnicity, disability, sex, physical condition, developmental disability, military or veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, marital or familial status, genetic information, or political affiliation; and

WHEREAS, equity and inclusion shall be the guiding principles and core values for every state workplace, program, activity, service, contract, and decision.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 10/01/2019

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence. All DVR services must be provided in competitive wage and integrated settings.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind”—rural and urban residents; ethnic or racial minorities; young adults; hourly and variable/seasonal-wage workers; those unaware of or without sufficient coverage options; retail workers; those re-entering from previous incarceration; and self employed individuals.. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Northwest Wisconsin Concentrated Economic Program, Inc. (NWCEP), African-American Men’s Health Education Center, Centro Hispano, Foundation for Black Women’s Wellness.  They will partner with Rapid Response Team, Transitional jobs program, VITA sites, Centro Hispano, Local barber shops, Black Women's Wellness Coalition, Boys and Girls Club, and Wisconsin Job Centers  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.

Contact:llison EspesethPhone: (608) 890-4784Email: aehales@wisc.edu

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Children's Long-Term Support Waiver Program Amendment Number:WI.0414.R03.02 - 07/01/2019

~~“Per the terms of a corrective action plan (CAP) required by CMS, Wisconsin has developed a uniform statewide rate-setting methodology for most CLTS waiver services. The following waiver services are subject to a statewide rate schedule:•     Adult family home•     Child care•     Community integration services•     Counseling and therapeutic services•     Daily living skills training•     Day services•     Financial management services•     Mentoring•     Nursing services•     Respite•     Support and service coordination•     Supported employment•     Supportive home care•     Transportation” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DPI distributes $1.9 billion to Wisconsin schools - 06/17/2019

~~“The department used $2.3 million in flexible federal funds to bolster $9.4 million in state allocations for this aid program. In addition, Special Education Transition Incentive Grants totaling $3.0 million went to 360 school districts and independent charter schools, in proportion to the number of their graduates with disabilities who were in successful employment or education one year after graduation. Finally, the department sent $1.8 million in Supplemental Special Education Aid to 11 small school districts where special education costs were high relative to district revenue.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Long Term Care Functional Screen Instructions - 06/03/2019

~~“For an individual who is employed, the screener is asked to select the setting or settings where the person works. If the person is working in a facility-based setting, the screener must ask if the person is interested in working in the community.  When making a selection for an employment setting, screeners should ask questions to help the person articulate their preferences. While the person's preference may be difficult to ascertain, screeners are to use their best professional judgment to select the most accurate answer.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Fiscal Practices Manual with Training Activities - 06/01/2019

~~DVR fee schedule rates of payment are determined based upon a competitive pricing analysis and an analysis of DVR costs for these services over aperiod of time not less than one year, but no more than two years. As appropriate, DVR will set rates based upon approved state, county, or federal rates for the same purchased services. If this process is used, it will be specified in the fee schedule services provided under these agreements include:• Customized Employment• Individual Placement and Support (IPS)• Internship/Temporary Work• Job Preparation and Development including Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), JobDevelopment Hire, and Job Retention• Job Shadow• Skills to Pay the Bills• Student Work Based Learning (Pre-ETS)• Supported Employment • Systematic Instruction (Other Than Supported Employment)• Vocational Evaluation• Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI)• Work Incentive Benefits Analysis 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Mental Health: Healthy Living - 05/31/2019

~~“We are working to reduce the impact of mental illnesses on individuals and communities.Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.Positive mental health allows people to:• Realize their full potential• Cope with the stresses of life• Work productively• Make meaningful contributions to their communities”

This page has links to programs that can assist persons with mental health conditions

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration - 05/16/2019

~~“Wisconsin received a federal award for a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration. The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

This page has links to information on the program

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

2017 WISCONSIN ACT 323 - 04/17/2018

~~“COACHING PROGRAM ESTABLISHED.   2017 WISCONSIN ACT 323: AN ACT to amend 20.438 (1) (a); and to create 46.2898 of the statutes; relating to: employment of individuals withdisabilities enrolled in long−term care programs and making an appropriation.  More information about the legislation concerning a model of coaching businesses in the hiring  and  employment  of  individuals  with  disabilities and its features can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Wisconsin Act 178: Employment First Bill - 03/29/2018

“An Act to create 47.05 of the statutes; relating to: competitive integrated employment of persons with a disability and granting rule-making authority.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WI Statutes: Vocational Rehabilitation; Specialized Programs for Persons with Disabilities - 08/26/2015

This WI statute defines persons with disabilities and explains Vocational Rehabilitation and “special programs for persons with disabilities.” It states that the State will, “Make vocational rehabilitation services under this chapter available in every county to all persons with disabilities who are present in the state, regardless of residency,” and details the services that will be available to people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Wisconsin SB 21 (Act 55) - 07/12/2015

"Senate Bill 21 as 2015 Wisconsin Act 55 is approved and deposited in the office of the Secretary of State...The following is a brief summary of how this budget, including my vetoes, will continue to make Wisconsin more prosperous, more independent and more efficient...Newly establishes Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) accounts to empower the disabled community and their families to achieve greater independence and assist with various expenses."

Systems
  • Other
Topics