Wisconsin

States - Big Screen

The motto of Wisconsin is "Forward," and it's clear to see that things are moving forward on Employment First initiatives that are empowering individuals with disabilities to find success in the careers they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Wisconsin’sVR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.24%
Change from
2014 to 2015
5,771,337
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.35%
Change from
2014 to 2015
351,787
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.99%
Change from
2014 to 2015
144,815
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.35%
Change from
2014 to 2015
41.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.37%
Change from
2014 to 2015
82.28%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 5,742,713 5,757,564 5,771,337
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 355,057 353,031 351,787
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 145,103 140,488 144,815
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,554,274 2,586,501 2,619,935
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.87% 39.79% 41.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.10% 81.15% 82.28%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.80% 5.50% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.80% 20.80% 20.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.40% 12.10% 11.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 338,222 339,579 333,922
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 347,572 337,992 347,167
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 591,940 582,635 585,992
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 53,913 55,258 52,516
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 31,645 33,986 34,937
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 7,921 6,434 9,262
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 9,386 10,701 10,660
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 14,399 13,328 14,097
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 8,082 8,923 8,375

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 10,442 10,674 10,982
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.40% 9.50% 9.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 160,842 161,894 161,864

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 3,395 3,562 3,683
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 6,013 5,843 5,178
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 15,779 14,613 15,603
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.50% 24.40% 23.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.40% 2.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.10% 1.30% 2.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.90% 6.10% 9.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% 3.00% 3.30%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 647 701 883
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 944 648 717
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,572 2,972 3,049
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,946 1,454 1,048

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 17,223 15,934 16,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 91 106 100
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 64 70 77
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 70.00% 66.00% 77.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.12 1.22 1.33

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
6,695
7,245
8,319
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 163 197 187
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 558 577 594
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,130 2,336 2,620
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,970 2,093 2,339
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,417 1,596 1,986
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 457 446 593
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 20.60% 27.10% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 9,316 9,159
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 235,031 237,335
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 179 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 431 504 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $22,923,000 $22,690,000 $22,743,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $65,460,000 $60,875,000 $59,921,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $103,492,000 $99,599,000 $96,127,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $14,235,000 $9,643,000 $11,564,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 22.00% 21.00% 18.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,114 2,069 2,797
Number of people served in facility based work. 7,108 6,824 7,289
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 7,755 7,667 7,959
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 60.00 54.90 52.90

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 61.91% 63.54% 65.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.97% 9.75% 9.56%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.23% 1.40% 1.43%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.75% 98.92% 99.65%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 29.80% 27.51% 27.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.40% 64.94% 64.51%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 72.90% 77.56% 77.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.60% 37.43% 37.36%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,759,088
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 269,729
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,118,183
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,387,912
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 410
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 862
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,272
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,894,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $16,572,273

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 16 9 4
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 2 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 72 74 62
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 4 6 5
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 94 89 71
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 25 19 5
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 24 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 9,156 9,578 6,253
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 451 488 301
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 9,656 10,085 6,559

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

The DVR, DPI, and DHS will continue joint sponsorship of training events focused on improving transition and vocational rehabilitation services. In addition to the agreement–specific training, DVR staffs are encouraged to attend other transition–focused trainings to increase their knowledge of transition issues and processes. The DVR supports attendance of staff at the annual Wisconsin Transition Conference, Employment First, Transition Academy and the annual Rehabilitation and Transition Conference, as a means to increase coordination of services and transition service delivery skills.

The DVR’s Statewide Transition Action and Resource Team (START), consisting of one primary and one alternate representative from each of the 11 VR workforce development service areas, act as local transition experts and technical assistance resource. START members will continue to provide training, technical assistance and consultation to staff in their respective service areas. The team’s goals also include improving individualized engagement of students with disabilities and their parents in the transition/ VR process as well as increasing engagement of schools in transition services. A continued focus for the START team will be to identify specific needs of DVR staff related to the provision of services to transition–aged youth and develop strategies and tools to address those needs. (Page 207-208)

DVR believes that all individuals that apply and seek assistance have the ability and desire to work. DVR commits itself to assisting disabled individuals with achieving dignity through work. Consistent with our mission, and our values, DVR, as expressed in public hearings and stakeholder feedback sessions, agrees that “employment first” reflects DVR’s core set of principles and practices that promote individualized planning and support for employment options for all disabled individuals and that it is the primary goal of our services.

The WRC assists the DVR in the preparation of the State Plan and amendments to the plan, applications, reports, needs assessments and evaluations required by the Rehabilitation Act and subsequent amendments.

The WRC has committees that assume duties assigned to the Council in the Rehabilitation Act. The WRC Evaluation Committee studies VR performance in serving specific groups of disabled individuals and reviews consumer satisfaction survey responses. The WRC Reports Committee develops the WRC Annual Report and assists with the development of the State Plan. The Executive Committee oversees the work of the Council and assures that Council functions and responsibilities are carried out. (Page 218)

Customized Employment

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Pages 186)

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic

Self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 189)

Customized Employment services can be used if an individual has not been successful utilizing typical supported employment services.

Supported Employment services in Wisconsin utilize a consumer centered resource team. This team includes the DVR consumer, DVR staff, the Supported Employment service provider, the special education or other teacher, long–term support case manager, the guardian or anyone else the consumer chooses to invite.

DVR will develop and implement printed materials and provide outreach and technical assistance to schools and families to share supported employment and other resources for employment related services.

DVR has identified some sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children’s waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long–term support. (Page 191)

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 219)

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Page 221)

  • Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long–term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees
  • Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model is expanding and will be available in more than 13 counties. The model is a systems change approach to provide employment using evidence based practice elements in the treatment of serious and persistent mental illness. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. IPS in Wisconsin also incorporates learning collaborative which collects data, sets outcome goals and provides ongoing technical assistance. (Page 225)
  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.
  • DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services (SES) as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee–for–service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community–based SES and LTES in lieu of center–based extended employment. (Page 226)

In FY 2016-2017 there is a plan to emphasize building capacity and improving the quality of the existing provider network. DVR has updated and strengthened the technical specifications for services, which include identification of specific roles, and responsibilities for the consumer, DVR and the service providers. We expect to provide training for providers that will include use of new methodologies for job development and on the job supports, taking some evidence based strategies

From Individual Placement and Support (IPS) and incorporating them into supported employment services. DVR will also be creating a standardized statewide service for customized employment. DVR will continue to explore strategies to identify new providers and to work with the existing provider network to increase capacity.

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 219)

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Page 221)

  • Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long–term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees.
  • Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model is expanding and will be available in more than 13 counties. The model is a systems change approach to provide employment using evidence based practice elements in the treatment of serious and persistent mental illness. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. IPS in Wisconsin also incorporates learning collaborative which collects data, sets outcome goals and provides ongoing technical assistance. (Page 225)
  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.
  • DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services (SES) as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee–for–service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community–based SES and LTES in lieu of center–based extended employment. ( Page 226)

From Individual Placement and Support (IPS) and incorporating them into supported employment services. DVR will also be creating a standardized statewide service for customized employment. DVR will continue to explore strategies to identify new providers and to work with the existing provider network to increase capacity.

DVR also has a goal to continue to expand the (IPS) model of supported employment for individual with serious and persistent mental illness in Wisconsin. This goal has been met. The number of sites has grown from three sites in 2010, to more than 22 in FY 15. It is expected that IPS will continue to grow across Wisconsin. DVR is an active partner in that effort.

(3) The VR program’s performance on the performance accountability indicators under section 12016 of WIOA.

A. Percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program. (Page 242)

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

DVR participated in a research study, which looked at Motivational Interviewing skills and how those skills impact the relationship between consumers and the VR counselor. This study was sponsored by TACE5 and supported by University of Wisconsin Madison and several private consultants. Since FFY 2013 over 188 counselors, 27 DVR supervisors and several Central Office Staff were trained. The results of this research have shown Motivational Interviewing to be very promising and DVR will continue to provide training as both a professional development tool as well as a counselor retention effort.

DVR has partners with the Promise Grant to expand training in "trauma–informed care" and reviewing additional opportunities to add to new and continuing staff training. More training will also be provided to advance "rapid engagement" with consumers to ensure a better and faster attachment to the labor force using techniques such as those demonstrated through IPS. This should also ensure smaller caseloads for counselors. (Page 204)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The one–stop delivery system’s compliance with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act is ensured through Wisconsin’s submittal of its Methods of Administration (MOA) to the US DOL’s Civil Rights Center.

The State of Wisconsin, Department of Workforce Development, Division of Employment and Training was first required to submit a Method of Administration (MOA) under the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) in 1984. These requirements continued in 1993 under the regulations implementing the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of JTPA as set forth in 29 CFR Part §34.33. The MOA requirements have remained substantially the same under 29 CFR Part §37.54(a) which also required the Governor to establish and maintain an MOA for the State. The most recent updated MOA submitted to the DOL Office of Compliance and Policy (OCP), Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management (OASAM) that describe the State of Wisconsin plan to meet the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of Section 188 of WIOA and its implementing regulations at 29 CFR Part §37 was submitted on December 18, 2014. New WIOA regulations that apply to equal opportunity and nondiscrimination recently changed from 29 CFR Part §37 to 29 CFR Part §38. The OCP acknowledged receipt of the MOA on January 23, 2015 which covers us from December 21, 2014 through December 21, 2016. Wisconsin is currently operating under the current MOA; however, we must review the MOA and the manner in which we have implemented our MOA to determine if any changes or updates are required prior to December 21, 2016. Wisconsin DWD–DET will update its MOA prior to December 21, 2016 in accordance to 29 CFR Part §38.54 WIOA funded sub–recipients of DET must comply with the same elements addressed in the State’s MOA. Additionally, contracts/grants funded under WIOA include equal opportunity nondiscrimination assurance language obligating the sub–recipient to comply with DWD–DET’s provision contained in the MOA, (Page 86)

Every WDB is required to ensure compliance with section 188 of WIOA in the Local WIOA Plan. For PY15 DWD took the new step of requiring that local WDBs consult with the local Independent Living Center regarding the local job centers. DWD’s intention in including that requirement was to facilitate more meaningful relationships between the WDBs and these important stakeholders. As the bookend to the program administration year, each WDB is monitored by the WIOA Civil Rights Compliance Officer to ensure that plans are being implemented. Wisconsin’s one–stop center certification policy has not yet been finalized. Additional descriptions will be placed here upon issuance. (Page 87-88)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

As a Round 2 DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed this 3–year, $2,330,000 demonstration project designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource supports improves the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6–month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post–DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin.

During the extension period, DEI focused on: 

  • Ensuring accessibility in all eleven Workforce Development Areas
    • Pilot areas:
      • WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues addressed
    • Control areas:
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered opportunity for American with Disabilities Act (ADA) inspections. Resulted in 8 inspections in 3 WDAs being completed;
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI. Resulted in 9 Job Centers in 4 WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, and specialized keyboards, etc.
    • All WDAs:
      • 49 Job Centers will have identical set up of new CPU, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology equipment.
  • Developing capacity to deliver awareness– and knowledge–building training to workforce staff, employers, and the public:
    • Piloted hybrid training that mixed live WebEx and in–person training. Presentations were recorded and will be available online through the Learning Center for Wisconsin public training and Cornerstone internal training platforms. Topics: Creating a Mentally Healthy Workplace (for employers) and Hmong Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity;
    • Developed a mental health stigma–reduction series of online training specifically for workforce development staff;
    • Developed a series of disability–related online training modules, currently in post–production preparation. Topics: Using the Assistive Technology on the JCW Computers, Disability Etiquette, How Disabilities Can Affect Job Seekers, Developing Cultural Competence, Learning Disabilities, Invisible Disabilities, Effective Communication with Job Seekers, and Employees with Disabilities. (Page 87)

Wisconsin’s participation in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) has well–positioned the state for continued physical and programmatic compliance. As a Round 2 DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed this 3–year, $2,330,000 demonstration project designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource supports improves the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6–month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post–DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin. (Page 117)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

During the extension period, DEI focused on: 

  • Ensuring accessibility in all eleven Workforce Development Areas
    • Pilot areas:
      • WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues addressed
    • Control areas:
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered opportunity for American with Disabilities Act (ADA) inspections. Resulted in 8 inspections in 3 WDAs being completed;
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI. Resulted in 9 Job Centers in 4 WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, and specialized keyboards, etc.
    • All WDAs:
      • 49 Job Centers will have identical set up of new CPU, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology equipment. 
  • Developing capacity to deliver awareness– and knowledge–building training to workforce staff, employers, and the public:
    • Piloted hybrid training that mixed live WebEx and in–person training. Presentations were recorded and will be available online through the Learning Center for Wisconsin public training and Cornerstone internal training platforms.

Topics: Creating a Mentally Healthy Workplace (for employers) and Hmong Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity;

  • Developed a mental health stigma–reduction series of online training specifically for workforce development staff;
  • Developed a series of disability–related online training modules, currently in post–production preparation.

Topics: Using the Assistive Technology on the JCW Computers, Disability Etiquette, How Disabilities Can Affect Job Seekers, Developing Cultural Competence, Learning Disabilities, Invisible Disabilities, Effective Communication with Job Seekers, and Employees with Disabilities. (Page 87)

Wisconsin is particularly interested in properly carrying out the financial literacy element. Under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant, staff training on asset development was created and delivered to WIA staff in the grant’s six pilot regions. The training included community-based asset development resources, relevant to the WDA that identified the resources. Although each local asset development guide focused on resources for job seekers with disabilities, many of the resources are also appropriate for individuals without disabilities.

Wisconsin’s DEI participation provided a solid start, and statewide creation and adoption of the guide is in progress. Web-based staff training will follow. The web-based training will focus on increasing awareness of what financial literacy is the impact of it on individuals at different stages of life, and how to find appropriate federal, state and local community-based services for job seekers. The training will be appropriate for and available to staff in WIOA Youth, Adult, and Dislocated Worker Programs as well as other partners. ( Page 117)

WRC Recommendation 7

We request updates on the PROMISE grant at our quarterly meetings to learn and share best practices on working with youth with disabilities. 

DSU Response:

DVR very much looks forward to sharing with the council the progress of all pilots and projects and steps taken by DVR to improve our services and outcomes. 

WRC Recommendation 8 (Page 172)

Most importantly, DVR has collaborated with the Board for People with Developmental Disabilities, the Department of Health Services, and the Department of Public Instruction on a pilot grant program designed to improve transition services by offering career and work experience while in high school. The “Let’s Get to Work” grant allowed a best practice to be developed between special education, DVR and long–term care providers to offer employment focused transition plans for developmental disabled students. The Promise Grant, where Wisconsin is one of six federal demonstration sites, further expands this collaboration and focus on youth.

DVR has a collaborative project with the Great Lakes Inter–Tribal Council as an Innovation and Expansion option. Three tribal entities are currently working with DVR to "Place and Train" Wisconsin DVR consumers in tribal businesses. (Page 172)

Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WDVR will pilot approaches, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development. (Page 189)

Use of systematic instruction principles will be piloted and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.

Supported Employment funds will be provided to youth with significant disabilities needing supported employment to utilize at least 10% of the budget required by WIOA. The remaining funds will be provided to adults with significant disabilities. It is expected that WDVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI VR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services. The WDVR case management system has the ability to identify cases and expend the funds allotted as required by RSA.

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including Individual Placement and Support (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). (Page 190)

In Wisconsin, extended service funding is available through Managed Care and County funded mental health services. DVR is planning to pilot systematic instruction principles and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.

It is expected that WDVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI VR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services.

DVR has a policy in place for the coordination of IEP’s and IPE’s prior to graduation and prior to that when necessary. In the past, service and treatment plans with long–term care and mental health were coordinated and services identified and funding responsibilities determined. Due to the nature and scope of the changes expected in the long–term care system in Wisconsin, it is difficult to know how this will be accomplished but it is expected that treatment and service plans will continue to include and involve active collaboration with DVR. (Page 192)

DVR partnered with the Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI) to provide training for individuals with disabilities in a retail setting. This national program began its pilot in Milwaukee–area Walgreens retail locations in 2012 and is now a statewide initiative.

Building on the success of the REDI model, also called place and train, DVR offered the place and train model with other businesses and is currently working with businesses throughout Wisconsin to implement this model in their workplaces. 

Additionally, DVR has become the Point of Contact for Kwik Trip in all its Wisconsin convenience stores. DVR also works to meet the talent needs through our National Employment Team with employers such as Meijer, Wells Fargo, and Amazon. (Page 194)

Eligibility Pilot: Beginning in 2015, DVR contracted with the University of Wisconsin–Stout Vocational Rehabilitation Institute (SVRI) for an eligibility review process, authorizing SVRI to collect and make recommendations to appropriate DVR staff for eligibility and OOS determinations. This pilot is anticipated to free up to 15% of the counselor’s time to refocus on direct consumer employment plan activities. This pilot, therefore, anticipates that additional staff will be retained who experience "case burnout" from process activities. The data in Table 1 shows the number of permanent authorized FTEs by personnel category and the current vacancies in each category as of April 2014. However, we anticipate a vacancy rate of 5% during the 5 year projection period, (combination of past and current budget instructions). DVR anticipates maintaining adequate resources both in fiscal and staff resources to ensure a sustainable caseload. In December 2013, Act 58 provided funding for 9 additional VR Counselor positions. Table 1 Row Job Title Total positions Projected vacancies over the next 5 years 1 VR Counselor 196 10 2 Consumer Case Coordinator 69 3 3 Field Managers/Supervisors 25 1 4 Central Office Senior Leadership/ Managers 7 3 5 Central Office Staff Support 25 1 6 Total 322 18

DVR will continue to maintain an average employment plan caseload of 16,500, not to exceed 17,000, during FFY 2016–20. During the 5 year caseload projection period, the counselor caseload ratio should continue to comply with the DVR’s goal of not more than 100 consumers with active IPEs per counselor per month, recognizing that another 20–25% are individuals in applicant or plan development. ( Page 198)

Supported Employment funds will be provided to youth with significant disabilities needing supported employment to utilize at least 10% of the budgetary required by WIOA. The remaining funds will be provided to adults with significant disabilities. It is expected that WI DVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI DVR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services. Use of systematic instruction principles will be piloted and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.  (Page 219)

Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports. ( Page 221)

  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports. (Page 226)

DVR entered into an agreement with the Department of Health Services to pilot a new comprehensive approach for the provision of supported employment to individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness called individual placement and support (IPS). The Wisconsin IPS system change grant partnership with Dartmouth College Community Mental Health Program provides funds for mental health care employment service expansion and technical assistance. As part of the 3–year initiative, DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population.  DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population. (Page 236)

3) Develop and implement a plan to increase available supported employment resources. The DVR plan is to increase coordination with other funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care long term funding and services, and increase the number of supported employment providers in targeted areas of the state. The BPDD pilot “Let’s Get to Work” for transition students also holds great promise as a template for adult braided services and further collaboration with the state’s long–term care program. (Page 239)

The following table and narrative highlights the innovation and expansion activity supported by DVR funds in FFY15. Innovation and expansion activities are generally funded in accordance with DVR’s state fiscal year (i.e., July 1 – June 30) but may be conducted on a federal fiscal year if applicable. Contract / Agreement Start/End DVR funds Fiscal Arrangement and Type 8 local I and E projects with CIL’s 7/1/2010–6/30/13 $15,000 each location annually Each CIL worked with the local WDA Director to develop new patterns of services to be provided to DVR Consumers. Projects include: Assistive Technology work evaluation services, peer assisted job search instruction, financial literacy training and youth job groups. REDI Walgreen’s 4/1/12–6/30/13 $18,600 for site creation. Case service funds for direct consumer services. Intensive retail training with supports and competency based certification for potential hire with corporate partners. Let’s Get to Work 2/1/12–6/30/15 Case Service funds via Youth OJT DVR has committed and created a youth transition OJT to attach youth with disabilities to competitive employment prior to HS completion. Vocational Futures Planning Services 10/1/12 –9/30/15 Case Service funds Collaborative effort with long term care and other providers to provider individualized–based services, including case management services, to people with significant physical disabilities that are in need of long term care. Milwaukee Wrap Around Pilot 6/1/20132013 –9/30/ 2015 $350,500 annually Mentor program to establish resources and services to assist in employment. Innovation and Expansion—Place and Train Models. (Page 244)

DVR partnered with the Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI) to provide training for individuals with disabilities in a retail setting. This national program began its pilot in Milwaukee–area Walgreens retail locations in 2012 and is now a statewide initiative.

Building on the success of the REDI model, also called place and train, DVR offered the place and train model with other businesses and is currently working with businesses throughout Wisconsin to implement this model in their workplaces.

As required under section 101(a)(15)(E)(ii) of the Act, the Wisconsin Rehabilitation Council (WRC) and the DVR annually jointly prepare and submit to the RSA Commissioner a report on the activities and progress of the DVR in meeting its goals and priorities. This report is known as the annual Wisconsin Rehabilitation Council report. (Page 245)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Wisconsin is particularly interested in properly carrying out the financial literacy element. Under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant, staff training on asset development was created and delivered to WIA staff in the grant’s six pilot regions. The training included community-based asset development resources, relevant to the WDA that identified the resources. Although each local asset development guide focused on resources for job seekers with disabilities, many of the resources are also appropriate for individuals without disabilities. (Page 117)

  • information, services, assistance, assessments and job searching
  • computer and technology skill enhancement
  • resume development
  • interview skills
  • GED assistance
  • Educational opportunities
  • Short term training
  • Career assessments and exploration
  • Referrals to organizations for a variety of financial literacy information or services
  • Resource Room assistance
  • Computer access for job searching, writing and printing of resumes, online employment applications and assistance
  • Skill Explorer – the State skill matching system that links skill sets to current employment opportunities locally, regionally and statewide
  • Outreach – which can include meeting clients at itinerant locations, career and job fairs; local libraries
  1. Registering on Job Center of Wisconsin also provides the opportunity to receive e–blasts which provide information on Job Fairs, hiring events
  2. Claimants can utilize Skill Explorer which assists in matching skill sets to current job openings, including location and rates of pay (Page 128)

After the Division is assured that eligible individuals are adequately supported in their employment plan costs, and that Title I–B funds have been used to activate individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities from the OOS wait list in a timely manner, up to 2% of Title I–B case aids funds may be used for other allowable purposes, including innovation and expansion services. The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is currently focusing on programs that expand financial literacy, job development, youth services, and underserved tribal populations. Each program was created to address specific local needs in respective WDAs. Topics include: banking basics, car purchases, budgeting, understanding credit, employment barriers, online applications, social skills, temporary work experiences, self–advocacy, and obtaining gainful employment. Throughout the year, quarterly reports are due to DVR for review of progress and scope. It is anticipated for these services to transition from I&E funding to fee–for–service agreements upon successful effective completion. (Page 229)

Specialized Innovation and Expansion Projects In WDA 1, 5 and 8 there are financial literacy projects that established a program to help consumers better understand fraud, identity theft, savings, budgeting, and financial stability. The cost of the combined project: $40,686.

In WDA’s 5 and 6 there was a Project in partnership with the Division of Employment and Training provides comprehensive, individualized and value added services to DVR consumers. It adds optimizing opportunities to stay competitive in the inclusive marketplace. The cost of the project $148,218 (Page 243)

The following table and narrative highlights the innovation and expansion activity supported by DVR funds in FFY15. Innovation and expansion activities are generally funded in accordance with DVR’s state fiscal year (i.e., July 1 – June 30) but may be conducted on a federal fiscal year if applicable. Contract / Agreement Start/End DVR funds Fiscal Arrangement and Type 8 local I and E projects with CIL’s 7/1/2010–6/30/13 $15,000 each location annually Each CIL worked with the local WDA Director to develop new patterns of services to be provided to DVR Consumers. Projects include: Assistive Technology work evaluation services, peer assisted job search instruction, financial literacy training and youth job groups. REDI Walgreen’s 4/1/12–6/30/13 $18,600 for site creation. Case service funds for direct consumer services. Intensive retail training with supports and competency based certification for potential hire with corporate partners. Let’s Get to Work 2/1/12–6/30/15 Case Service funds via Youth OJT DVR has committed and created a youth transition OJT to attach youth with disabilities to competitive employment prior to HS completion. Vocational Futures Planning Services 10/1/12 –9/30/15 Case Service funds Collaborative effort with long term care and other providers to provider individualized–based services, including case management services, to people with significant physical disabilities that are in need of long term care. Milwaukee Wrap Around Pilot 6/1/20132013 –9/30/ 2015 $350,500 annually Mentor program to establish resources and services to assist in employment. Innovation and Expansion—Place and Train Models. (Page 244)

Benefits

Cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include: 

  • 1,637 Job Center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals external to the Job Centers;
  • 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks;
  • 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period;
  • 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 87)

The One–Stop system will ensure access to services or programs to English language learners (ELLs) by providing program information in alternate languages and formats through use of interpreters, translation, and other methods, as necessary and appropriate. Services to ELLs will be provided at the time and in a manner that avoids the imposition of an undue burden on or delay in receiving important benefits or services. As needed, clients in need of English Language Learning services will be will be connected with partner providers at a technical college or community based literacy organization.(Page 89)

If an entity other than the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation fails to provide or pay for comparable benefits or services for an eligible individual, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation shall provide or pay for such services to the individual.

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation will claim reimbursement for the services from the entity that failed to provide or pay for such services. Such entity shall reimburse the DVR pursuant to the terms of the interagency agreement or other mechanism described in this paragraph according to the procedures established in such agreement or mechanism.

Agency partners involved in the interagency agreements specifying the coordination of service procedures are described in this attachment. A DVR services coordination agreement may involve coordinated use of interagency funds. The service delivery timeframes within the Act and those referenced in the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual shall establish the minimum standard for the timely delivery of vocational rehabilitation services. At its discretion, the Division may create additional requirements for the coordination and timely delivery of services when establishing mechanisms for interagency coordination that affect the delivery of services.( Page 177)

The Wisconsin DOC has awarded a Benefits Specialist Program to Legal Action of Wisconsin (LAW). The project, Disabled Offenders Economic Security (DOES) Project, will work with the 13 DOC institutions identified as having the highest number of inmates with serious mental illness and DD, to ensure that disabled offenders receive their benefits during the re– entry process, including employment and DVR referrals. (Page 178)

DVR employs an outcome based statewide fee structure with technical specifications for commonly used and available services. Statewide rates and technical specifications established for the services most commonly purchased from non–profit vocational rehabilitation service providers include: benefits analysis, internship/temporary work, job coaching, job preparation, development and placement, supported employment, vocational evaluation, and IPS supported employment, assistive technology assessment and services. Agencies wishing to provide these services sign a fee–for–service agreement with DVR. The statewide rates, technical specifications for services, service provider agreement and the providers that have a signed agreement with DVR are posted on the DVR public website. Other service agreements may be developed as required and appropriate. Agencies are must renew annual and sign service provider agreements for each new State Fiscal Year. (Page 187)

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits.(Page 198- 190)

DVR has identified some sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children’s waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long–term support. (Page 191)

  • Long–term support for people who do not qualify for these supports based on IQ – for example, people diagnosed with autism or mental illness.
  • Improved job coaching so that coaching can fade in a reasonable and timely way.
  • Development of a mentor system for work place role models
  • Ability to address basic needs before or during rehabilitation e.g. food shelter, basic medical care.
  • Improved use of appropriate work skills evaluation tools
  • Support of business community for developing a work environment friendly to individuals with disabilities, e.g. need for part time employment, preservation of benefits, flexibility, volunteer work.
  • Support of wrap around services not just on the job, e.g. transportation.
  • Need to change the long term support system to a managed care approach to retain and expand funding for long–term supported employment services
  • Need to orient the long term care system toward a “money follows the person” approach
  • Development of natural supports, in lieu of funded long–term extended services
  • Expansion of peer support specialists for individuals with mental illness.
  • Informational services regarding various options and programs for families.
  • More and better targeted career information to address the attitude that there are no jobs that persons with disabilities can do
  • Increased need for soft skill preparation to expand employment opportunities
  • Increased education for business community re: the business benefits of hiring our consumers
  • Expanded work incentives and increased access to benefits advisement
  • Need for expanded work incentive demonstrations to more fully address the number of consumers experiencing disincentive to full employment (e.g., SSDI $2/$1 benefit offset and “Making Work Pay” cost–share demonstration)
  • DVR Administrator to continue to provide quarterly updates on the wait list numbers to the Council as recommended. (Page 210) 

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits.

Programmatic Goal 5: DVR will meet and exceed the expenditure requirement under WOIA requiring at least 50% of supported employment funds on youth with significant disabilities.  (Page 219)

The DVR continues to utilize technical specifications and fee schedules in the provision of services provided by Community Rehabilitation Programs including: job development, supported employment, job coaching, benefits analysis, and vocational evaluation. In addition, the DVR conducts regular meetings with vendors of these services for feedback, clarification and ongoing compliance and improvement of services.

DVR will continue to provide an OJT affirmative hiring initiative to assist employers with the initial cost of training a hired DVR job seeker. DVR area managers train CRP job–placement staff on the use of the OJT initiative. CRP job placement staff is encouraged to use the OJT initiative when they speak to employers about hiring DVR job seekers. (Page 233)

At the service delivery level, in the State of Wisconsin the TAA program integrates our employment and training program activities in coordination with other workforce entities such as WIOA Dislocated Worker Program, Veterans Program, Technical Colleges; within the established One–Stop Job Center (workforce development) delivery system. TAA staff maintains communication to all partners in the Job Center by attending staff meetings & Rapid Response sessions, and have an active role with key functions within the Job Center. By attending Job Center staff meetings, partners are provided updates on TAA legislation, new petition filings and certifications, and upcoming Trade Intake events happening in their WDA. Local Job Service TAA staff will be present at all Trade Intake sessions. In addition, partner entities (WIOA, Veteran, Technical Colleges, etc.) will be invited to participate in the Intake in order to increase the likelihood of co–enrollment or dual–enrollment, and dates and times are coordinated as meeting arrangements are being made. WIOA will maintain a working knowledge of TAA benefits and services in order to provide these services to co–enrolled participants through WIOA case management. (Page 261)

All newly hired LVER or DVOP staff will complete on–line distance learning regarding veteran’s benefits. This training is provided by NVTI Training Solutions, a DOLVETS sponsored training provider. All FTE staff will be required to attend Facilitating Veteran Employment training offered by NVTI. In addition, LVER will receive training on employer outreach. DVOPs will receive training on Facilitating Veteran Employment and Intensive Services. All LVER or DVOP training will be provided within 18 months of hire. Staff will receive instructions on all data entry from DWD/OVS supervisor. Specific Webinar necessary training will be provided to LVER and DVOP staff by DWD. All DWD/OVS will receive additional training requested by staff or DWD management through Cornerstone. (Page 275)

School to Work Transition

DVR staff attends Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings, with consent from the student and family. DVR is also available to provide information and technical assistance on transition services to teachers, parents, and other organizations and councils.

As outlined in the TAG and the DVR Policy the development of the plan for employment for students who are eligible for plan development, is to occur prior to the student leaving school. DVR staff and educators are encouraged to coordinate the provision of services and transition activities for students who are eligible for both IEP and an IPE services to assist them in transitioning from school to work.

The DVR Statewide Transition Action and Resource Team (START), supported by the interagency agreement, have the role to improve consistency and engagement in the transition process. The DVR START team and the DPI Wisconsin Transition Improvement Grant (TIG) also collaborate to improve consistency in the provision of service to youth with disabilities as they transition from school to post high school activities that include VR services. TIG provides technical assistance to school districts, Cooperative Educational School Districts (CESA) and county Transition Advisory Councils, including, information dissemination and participation in staff development activities. The Interagency Agreement also supports TIG. DVR START and TIG also collaborate to provide training regarding the Interagency Agreement. (Page 185)

  • DVR conducts regular collaborative meetings and activity with sources of long term support including managed care organizations, self–directed managed care and county programs to facilitate referrals, service coordination and increase outcomes.
  • DVR is a strong partner in the Board for People with Developmental Disabilities and their “Let’s Get to Work” pilot to strengthen career and job attachments for high school transition students. Outcome goals include:
    • Changes in policy that increase community employment for youth with I/DD
    • Increases in integrated, community employment rates of youth with I/DD o Changes in stakeholder attitudes about the employability of youth with I/DD
  • The federally funded PROMISE grant and Let’s Get to Work are comprised of 4 main areas: 
  1. Consortium of 70 key stakeholders who identify policy issues and includes a youth track,
  2. A policy team that takes the work of the Consortium and strategizes way to implement policy changes,
  3. 9 school pilot sites implementing evidence based practices and identifying barriers to employment, and
  4. Coaches who provide intense, on–site technical assistance to the school sites. (Page 226)
Data Collection

No specific disability related information found.

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Business services professionals representing various programs and services serve on a local Business services Team, and use a shared business relationship (account) management system in order to effectively communicative activities with businesses in real-time. DVR is represented on local business service teams primarily through its business service consultants. Business Services professionals participate in collaborative training with other partners.

DVR participated in planning and attending the annual Collaborate conference which brings business services professionals and business together to discuss needs, opportunities, successes and best practices.

Additionally, state agencies began convening in PY15 at the direction of Governor Walker to create a one-stop portal for businesses to ensure that all employers, including small businesses, can learn about available services and programs. While this project is in early stages, it has the potential to be invaluable to helping businesses find talent. (Page 52)

Career Pathways

Guidance and support will be provided statewide at the agency level by the Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee. Financial resources will be provided, in part, through the TAACCCT Exceeding the Cap project, funded by DOL and called Advancing Careers of TAA and Transitions or ACT2. The Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee includes representation from the WTCS, DWD, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI), the Wisconsin Workforce Development Association (WWDA), and the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC). The active participation of the partners of the Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee ensures that career pathways in Wisconsin are industry-driven and support students and job seekers of all ages, backgrounds, and abilities. (Page 33)

WIOA requirements of service provider report cards will be made possible through data sharing. Partners will gather and analyze data, synthesize it into reports, share findings with other partners, and facilitate discussions for improvements. Once data sharing capabilities are established, partners will make the report cards easily accessible to job seekers, WIOA core partners, and the public. Each partner will ensure that its own staff is kept trained on how to access and use the report cards. All core partners’ services, including Career Pathways and ABE/High School Equivalency Diploma, will be part of the service provider report card offerings. (Page 35)

The State is a recognized national leader in career pathways beginning in Basic Skills, moving through post-secondary coursework (concurrently in early courses) and resulting in post-secondary credential attainment. Over 52% of students who enter the system through ABE/ELL enroll in post-secondary coursework in the same or following academic year.

Career Pathways offer an efficient and customer-centered approach to training and education by successfully articulating the appropriate secondary, ABE, postsecondary education and training, career and academic advising and supportive services to enter and progress in a career.

Career Pathway; a series of connected education and training strategies and support services that enable individuals to secure industry relevant certification and obtain employment within an occupational area and to advance to higher levels of future education and employment in that area.

Registered Apprenticeship Access to Postsecondary Credentials is improved with the increased collaboration through the WTCS and Career Pathways…etc.

In addition, this access is strengthened with the increased partnership with apprenticeship in several areas.  (Page 55)

  • Research-based activities such as the STAR reading program (Wisconsin has trained 186 ABE teachers in the STAR approach, and this group has an active web-based learning community)
  • Adult Numeracy Initiative training
  • Preparing to Achieve training
  • Contextualizing the GED training (WTCS-developed)
  • Extensive Career Pathway and Career Pathway Bridge training for both ABE and ELL (The WTCS has hundreds of career pathways identified, and many of these have integrated ABE/occupational Career Pathway Bridges attached)
  • Training in connecting as many partners as possible into our career pathways approach (through Wisconsin’s Moving Pathways Forward initiative).
  • Training in the use of the CCRS-aligned WTCS ABE curriculum standards (required of all grantees) (Page 161)
Employment Networks

Cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include: 

  • 1,637 Job Center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals external to the Job Centers;
  • 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks;
  • 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period;
  • 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 87)
  • DVR will continue to promote the “Partnership Plus” opportunities in the Ticket to Work (TTW) program. DVR will share information with eligible Ticket holders on post–VR services and supports available through assignment of their Ticket to an approved employment network provider.  (Page 227)
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Wisconsin Employment First Grant Recipients - 09/22/2017

“The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities awarded Employment First Partner grants to 14 community organizations, including: schools, employment providers, managed care organizations, and advocacy organizations.  These organizations will work in their local communities to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Activities will include:  legislative breakfasts, Take Your Legislator to Work visits, business recognition events; leadership mentoring, media campaigns, public service announcements, commercials, community conversations, presentations to local civic groups (e.g., chambers, Rotary clubs) and employer groups, business tours, and business to business mentoring.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 08/01/2017

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

WI Project SEARCH - 07/01/2017

“Project SEARCH is a business led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration. A 9-12 month program, Project SEARCH provides total immersion in a large community business. Students with disabilities are offered a workforce alternative for their last year of high school. All participants must be eligible for services with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). At some sites, young adults who have completed high school may be eligible to participate in Project SEARCH.

The Project SEARCH partnership includes a local high status business, a school, DVR, a vocational services agency and a disability services agency, such as a managed care organization. The business provides an on-site training classroom, business liaison and rotational internships for on the job training. The school provides an instructor. DVR works with a local vocational services agency to supply job coaches who support students in their internships as needed and assist with final job placement. The disability services agency provides follow along services for any eligible student who is hired at the business site or in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 04/05/2017

“This year’s conference title is Embracing Change: Together We Make It Happen. The conference focuses on the changes happening at the state and federal level and how these changes will significantly increase integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. …

Change provides both opportunities and challenges. This conference brings together individuals with disabilities, family members, state vocational rehabilitation counselors, employment providers, policy makers, and educators to learn and share creative ways to address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Department of Health Services Guiding Principles for Competitive Integrated Employment for People with Disabilities in Long-term Care - 04/01/2017

“The Department of Health Services (DHS) has established a list of Guiding Principles that build on the value of full inclusion of people with disabilities served in our long-term care programs. These principles are evidence-based practices that align with our vision for the future for people with disabilities in our communities. We recognize that each person’s path toward competitive integrated employment involves a person-centered planning process that includes a variety of experiences to build toward successful jobs.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 02/17/2017

“Supported employment services are provided in a working alliance with many partners. Communication is the key to success between these partners. Use of issued agency guidance, technical assistance guides, and policies and regulations is encouraged to build collaboration.

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 10/01/2016

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 02/15/2016

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR in 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Supported Employment Fees/Customized Employment - 10/01/2015

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development chart of supported employment and customized employment fees.   It details the Supported Employment Service, and the fee for each service.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WI Statutes: Vocational Rehabilitation; Specialized Programs for Persons with Disabilities - 08/26/2015

This WI statute defines persons with disabilities and explains Vocational Rehabilitation and “special programs for persons with disabilities.” It states that the State will, “Make vocational rehabilitation services under this chapter available in every county to all persons with disabilities who are present in the state, regardless of residency,” and details the services that will be available to people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Wisconsin SB 21 (Act 55) - 07/12/2015

"Senate Bill 21 as 2015 Wisconsin Act 55 is approved and deposited in the office of the Secretary of State...The following is a brief summary of how this budget, including my vetoes, will continue to make Wisconsin more prosperous, more independent and more efficient...Newly establishes Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) accounts to empower the disabled community and their families to achieve greater independence and assist with various expenses."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Wisconsin Fair Employment Act

Wisconsin's Fair Employment Law gives civil rights protections to qualified persons with disabilities. The law applies to virtually all, private and public employers, regardless of the number of employees. Under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), disability discrimination is also prohibited for employers having 15 or more employees. Both laws are designed to ensure equal opportunity in all aspects of employment.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 08/01/2017

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Department of Health Services Guiding Principles for Competitive Integrated Employment for People with Disabilities in Long-term Care - 04/01/2017

“The Department of Health Services (DHS) has established a list of Guiding Principles that build on the value of full inclusion of people with disabilities served in our long-term care programs. These principles are evidence-based practices that align with our vision for the future for people with disabilities in our communities. We recognize that each person’s path toward competitive integrated employment involves a person-centered planning process that includes a variety of experiences to build toward successful jobs.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 02/17/2017

“Supported employment services are provided in a working alliance with many partners. Communication is the key to success between these partners. Use of issued agency guidance, technical assistance guides, and policies and regulations is encouraged to build collaboration.

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 10/01/2016

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 02/15/2016

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR in 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Supported Employment Fees/Customized Employment - 10/01/2015

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development chart of supported employment and customized employment fees.   It details the Supported Employment Service, and the fee for each service.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Transition Action Guide For Post-secondary Planning - 03/01/2015

This Transition Action Guide (TAG) was developed to support the 2007 Interagency Agreement among the Department of Workforce Development (DWD), the Department of Public Instruction (DPI), and the Department of Health Services (DHS). This guide suggests best practices and resources to assist key stakeholders (students, parents/guardians, teachers and school team members, DVR counselors, Children and Adult Long –Term Care and Mental Health professionals, and ADRC representatives) involved in the transition process. This tool can be used as a framework to improve communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

A Better Bottom Line: Governor Scott Walker Delivers Remarks at Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 04/03/2014

“Governor Walker proclaimed 2014 as the Year of A Better Bottom Line to encourage and promote employment opportunities for people with disabilities... During the Year of A Better Bottom Line, Governor Walker is directing state agencies to focus on recognizing and promoting public and private programs, companies, and organizations that are improving employment opportunities for people with disabilities, including veterans and students.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Priorities for People with Disabilities in Wisconsin

“This packet provides information and recommendations on various issues that people with disabilities face, including integrated employment, access to health care and schools, and special education funding.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Wisconsin Individual Placement and Support

IPS is an evidenced based practice model of supported employment for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. In Wisconsin the Department of Workforce Development, DVR has partnered with the Department of Health Services - Division of Mental Health to establish IPS in Wisconsin as part of a grant from Dartmouth College and Johnson and Johnson. Mental health services in Wisconsin are provided by each county. The IPS model involves a team approach involving an Employment Specialist and a DVR counselor becoming a part of a mental health treatment team, with employment becoming a focus of mental health services. Adherence to the prescribed national model is essential. Fidelity reviews are conducted until good fidelity is achieved. Technical assistance is provided as part of the grant and can be provided for counties wishing to implement IPS. Legislation has been proposed (2014) for a significant expansion of IPS availability in Wisconsin.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation: “Employment First Team” - 03/01/2015

Lists team members and headquarters as of March 2015.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Transition Interagency Agreement - 12/02/2010

This interagency agreement has been revised from the July 2007 interagency agreement to now focus on both students with disabilities transitioning from high school as well as adults with disabilities, who have an expectation for integrated competitive employment. It has also been elaborated for clarity and to reflect best practices associated with increasing employment opportunities for people with cognitive and/or physical disabilities who also have challenges with mental health. Based on recommendations made by a statewide employment task force, this agreement represents the intent to fully coordinate all of the activities and programs within each agency, for every internal and external stakeholder who is striving to achieve employment for citizens with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Interagency Agreement MOU: Adults and Transitioning Youth - 12/02/2010

“This agreement between DPI, DVR, and DHS has four overall priorities supporting integrated employment: To comply with federal legal mandates under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA). To provide practical guidance, technical assistance, and training to internal and external stakeholders and staff regarding employment-related services and supports. To provide information on employment services to individuals with disabilities and their family members or guardians so they will be able to participate fully in employment. To provide clarification of roles of stakeholders within each respective department regarding individuals with disabilities who have identified support needs associated with employment and independent living, so that individuals and their families may regard such efforts to be as seamless, non-duplicative, and as transparent as possible.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for the Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program - 11/10/2009

“The purpose of this MOU is for the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) and the Department of Children and Families, Division of Family and Economic Security, Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program to establish collaborative efforts regarding their services and to develop a common understanding regarding their roles, policies, and procedures to better serve individuals with disabilities who may benefit from services from both programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Department of Health Services’ Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF): Final Report - 07/18/2008

“Against this backdrop, the Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF) was convened in May 2007 by Division of Long-Term Care Administrator Sinikka Santala and charged with recommending a comprehensive strategy to expand work options for adults who rely on the community-based, long-term care system. The Task Force, composed of 28 members representing a wide range of interests and expertise, analyzed the challenges and identified best practices from Wisconsin and elsewhere for overcoming these challenges.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Committee for people with disability Work plan

The Governor’s Committee for People with Disabilities: • Advises the Governor and state agencies on problems faced by people with disabilities, • Reviews legislation and advises the Governor about legislation affecting people with disabilities, • Suggests to the Governor and state agencies ways to enhance the effective operations of publicity and privately administered or supported programs serving people with disabilities, • Promotes the goal of self-sufficiency for people with disabilities, • Promotes the collection, dissemination and incorporation of adequate information about persons with disabilities into public planning at all levels of government, • Promotes public awareness of needs and abilities of people with disabilities, and • Encourages the effective involvement of people with disabilities in government.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other

Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities

“Transition is helping students with disabilities and their families think about their life after high school and identify long-range goals designing the high school experience to ensure that students gain the skills and connections they need to achieve these goals the provision of funds and services to local school districts to assist in the transition process.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Survival Coalition of Wisconsin Disability Organizations

“The intention of the Wisconsin Employment First Coalition is to partner with people with disabilities, other stakeholders, businesses and the public to increase awareness of the need to provide integrated employment opportunities here in Wisconsin. Survival Coalition supports integrated employment as the presumed outcome for people with disabilities. They believe that everyone can and should work in integrated jobs.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

Wisconsin has an APSE chapter.  “WI APSE believes that a state-wide Employment First effort is a vital component to the goal of increasing employment outcomes for citizens with disabilities in a manner that promotes equality of opportunity…Between May and September 2009, WI APSE facilitated group discussions about employment opportunities in eight locations around the state.” This document is a compilation of their observations, suggestions and next steps to implementing Employment First in Wisconsin.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Employment First Community Action Team’s (CATs)

The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities and National APSE  teamed up to fund the technical assistance and training of three to five pilot “Employment First” Community Action Teams (CATs) sites round the state. “The purpose of the CATs is to implement practices around the state aligned with the Employment First Initiative to support an increased number of people with disabilities in Wisconsin to work in their communities. CATs will take the lead in implementing action plan items at a local level, setting local benchmarks, and reporting on progress.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Wisconsin Employment First Grant Recipients - 09/22/2017

“The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities awarded Employment First Partner grants to 14 community organizations, including: schools, employment providers, managed care organizations, and advocacy organizations.  These organizations will work in their local communities to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Activities will include:  legislative breakfasts, Take Your Legislator to Work visits, business recognition events; leadership mentoring, media campaigns, public service announcements, commercials, community conversations, presentations to local civic groups (e.g., chambers, Rotary clubs) and employer groups, business tours, and business to business mentoring.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

WI Project SEARCH - 07/01/2017

“Project SEARCH is a business led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration. A 9-12 month program, Project SEARCH provides total immersion in a large community business. Students with disabilities are offered a workforce alternative for their last year of high school. All participants must be eligible for services with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). At some sites, young adults who have completed high school may be eligible to participate in Project SEARCH.

The Project SEARCH partnership includes a local high status business, a school, DVR, a vocational services agency and a disability services agency, such as a managed care organization. The business provides an on-site training classroom, business liaison and rotational internships for on the job training. The school provides an instructor. DVR works with a local vocational services agency to supply job coaches who support students in their internships as needed and assist with final job placement. The disability services agency provides follow along services for any eligible student who is hired at the business site or in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2011

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project." Wisconsin received a grant to support their Rural Supported Employment and Peer Support Programs.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

MIG-RATS

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Wisconsin PROMISE Initiative

The PROMISE initiative is intended to improve services for youth SSI (Social Security Supplemental Security Income) recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI.   PROMISE is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Social Security Administration, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. Department of Labor.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Disability Employment Initiative

"The WI Disability Employment Initiative was designed to ‘improve the accessibility and accountability of the public workforce development system for individuals with disabilities,’ extending ‘promising practices implemented by disability program navigators.’ Wisconsin’s Disability Employment Initiative will ‘improve coordination and collaboration among employment and training and asset development programs carried out at a state and local level.’ Linking to the ‘Ticket to Work program,’ Wisconsin seeks to build what members of Congress termed ‘effective community partnerships that leverage public and private resources to better serve individuals with disabilities and improve employment outcomes.’”  The grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WI Disability Program Navigator

“ETA and SSA are jointly funding the DPN Initiative in 42 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the United States Virgin Islands where SSA implemented employment support initiatives. This Initiative promotes comprehensive services and work incentive information for SSA beneficiaries and other people with disabilities, through the One Stop system. The Initiative focuses on developing new and ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive, and integrated access to services, creating systemic change, and expanding the workforce development system's capacity to serve customers with disabilities and employers.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Partnerships in Employment Systems Change Grant (Let’s Get to Work)

“The Wisconsin Let’s Get to Work project is a five-year, national systems change grant that will lead to improved community employment outcomes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities in transition…Funded by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities the project focuses on improving, developing and implementing policies and practices that raise community expectations and overall employment outcomes for youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 04/05/2017

“This year’s conference title is Embracing Change: Together We Make It Happen. The conference focuses on the changes happening at the state and federal level and how these changes will significantly increase integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. …

Change provides both opportunities and challenges. This conference brings together individuals with disabilities, family members, state vocational rehabilitation counselors, employment providers, policy makers, and educators to learn and share creative ways to address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • WIOA

Family Care Integrated Employment Planning for Members with Physical Disabilities - 07/15/2015

This is a training designed to help Interdisciplinary Team (IDT) understand Family Care Integrated Employment Planning. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Action Guide For Post-secondary Planning - 03/01/2015

This Transition Action Guide (TAG) was developed to support the 2007 Interagency Agreement among the Department of Workforce Development (DWD), the Department of Public Instruction (DPI), and the Department of Health Services (DHS). This guide suggests best practices and resources to assist key stakeholders (students, parents/guardians, teachers and school team members, DVR counselors, Children and Adult Long –Term Care and Mental Health professionals, and ADRC representatives) involved in the transition process. This tool can be used as a framework to improve communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to employment.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 07/01/2014

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence. All DVR services must be provided in competitive wage and integrated settings.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

WI Self-Employment Toolkit V2.0 - 12/19/2013

“This toolkit was developed to assist DVR staff and consumers through the self-employment process. It addresses all areas of the process, from how to start the initial conversation with the consumer, through opening the business and closing the case successfully. The process outlined in this toolkit is in a 12-step format. Each step has a purpose and should be completed prior to moving on to the next step. It is expected that this process will be followed for all start-up self-employment cases.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation: Customized Self-Employment Toolkit - 08/01/2012

“This tool has been developed to assist DVR Staff throughout the exploration and development of a small business for consumers who need a customized or supported approach to self-employment. A consumer requiring a customized approach may need supports to develop and/or maintain the business. Supports could include: long term job coaching supports, ongoing case management, peer supports, natural supports, family supports or ongoing paid professional services for the business, etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Self-Directed Employment Planning Resource Guide - 07/01/2012

“This Resource Guide was designed to be used with the Self-Directed Employment Planning online modules. Since the Self-Directed Employment Planning modules are an on-line resource, website links are included as part of the Resource Guide. If you click on the website links in an electronic version of this guide from a computer, you should be able to go to each website.    This Resource Guide is set up in the same order as the training modules. There are ten sections that go with each of the ten on-line modules. You should listen to each module first and then take the time to look at the information in this Resource Guide that goes with each module.     This Resource Guide also contains helpful templates and samples that were described in the learning modules. You can use these templates in your planning. You can use parts or all of them. You can print off the pages you need and make as many copies of them as you want to use.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Department Workforce Development (DWD) and Department of Health Services (DHS) Technical Assistance Guide for Adults Seeking Integrated Employment - 12/28/2010

“This Adult Technical Assistance Guide (Adult TAG) is intended to improve communication, coordination, and services for adults with disabilities seeking integrated employment who participate in either the Family Care, Family Care Partnership, PACE or IRIS long term care programs and who are jointly eligible for Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) services. It is designed to be useful for all persons and agencies involved in the process of vocational placement and providing long term support for integrated employment.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Beach Center on Disability Research Highlights: Customized Employment - 07/15/2008

“In this study, personal and employment histories of 50 individuals with significant disabilities were examined in table format to identify trends in employment and support the validity of integrated work experiences. Personal histories included: exit year of high school, age disability label and residential support. Employment histories included work environment, time at job, work tasks, hours per week, hourly wage, professional support and reasons for changing jobs. The participants’ experiences began 15-24 years ago when they entered the services provided by Community Work Services Inc. in Madison, Wisconsin.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Self-Directed Employment Planning Modules

“This on-line series was designed to help people with disabilities think about their integrated employment options, understand employment supports, and create a plan to achieve their integrated employment goals.   There are 12 learning modules, which you can watch by clicking the links below.  Start with the introduction so that you can learn how to use this learning series.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Statewide Transition Plan (Medicaid)

The Department of Health Services (DHS) intends to transition the Community Recovery Services (CRS) program currently operating under the 1915(i) authority to a 1905(a) State Plan authority effective January 1, 2015, pending CMS approval. The DHS has issued a public notice regarding this transition under the Wisconsin State Register published November 15, 2014. If CMS does not approve the transition of the CRS program from a 1915(i) to a 1905(a) State Plan service, then DHS agrees to follow the statewide transition plan for Medicaid HCBS as outlined in this plan.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Wisconsin Medicaid State Plan

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Wisconsin's Medicaid program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Self Directed Support Waiver (IRIS)

“The IRIS Program is a Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver for self-directed long-term supports. The program is an option for adults with long term care needs. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Division of Long Term Care (DLTC), Office of IRIS Management under the authorization of the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) is responsible for oversight of the IRIS program. IRIS is available to Wisconsin residents determined financially eligible for Medicaid, functionally in need of nursing home or Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) level of care; and living in a county where managed long-term care and IRIS are available. People who are eligible have the choice of IRIS or managed care through their local Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Family Care Program

"Family Care was designed to provide cost-effective, comprehensive and flexible long-term care that will foster consumers’ independence and quality of life, while recognizing the need for interdependence and support…”

Family Care, authorized by the Governor and Legislature in 1998, serves people with physical disabilities, people with intellectual/developmental disabilities and frail elders, with the specific goals of: Giving people better choices about where they live and what kinds of services and supports they get to meet their needs; Improving access to services; Improving quality through a focus on health and social outcomes; [and] Creating a cost-effective system for the future.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Community Integration Program

“The Community Integration Program is a Medicaid Home and Community-Based Waiver for adults with developmental disabilities.”

“The CIP Waiver helps people with developmental disabilities to stay out of institutions, or to relocate from state centers and nursing homes back to their communities.  In many circumstances, CIP can help prevent someone from having to leave his/her community.  CIP is funded through the federal Medicaid Program (MA).  It is known as an "MA waiver" because the federal government has waived certain regulations, allowing Wisconsin to use the dollars to follow people to the community.  The money goes from the state to county waiver agencies who administer the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The motto of Wisconsin is "Forward," and it's clear to see that things are moving forward on Employment First initiatives that are empowering individuals with disabilities to find success in the careers they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Wisconsin’sVR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.24%
Change from
2014 to 2015
5,771,337
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.35%
Change from
2014 to 2015
351,787
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.99%
Change from
2014 to 2015
144,815
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.35%
Change from
2014 to 2015
41.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.37%
Change from
2014 to 2015
82.28%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 5,742,713 5,757,564 5,771,337
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 355,057 353,031 351,787
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 145,103 140,488 144,815
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,554,274 2,586,501 2,619,935
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.87% 39.79% 41.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.10% 81.15% 82.28%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.80% 5.50% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.80% 20.80% 20.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.40% 12.10% 11.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 338,222 339,579 333,922
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 347,572 337,992 347,167
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 591,940 582,635 585,992
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 53,913 55,258 52,516
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 31,645 33,986 34,937
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 7,921 6,434 9,262
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 9,386 10,701 10,660
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 14,399 13,328 14,097
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 8,082 8,923 8,375

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 10,442 10,674 10,982
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.40% 9.50% 9.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 160,842 161,894 161,864

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 3,395 3,562 3,683
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 6,013 5,843 5,178
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 15,779 14,613 15,603
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.50% 24.40% 23.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.40% 2.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.10% 1.30% 2.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.90% 6.10% 9.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% 3.00% 3.30%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 647 701 883
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 944 648 717
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,572 2,972 3,049
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,946 1,454 1,048

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 17,223 15,934 16,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 91 106 100
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 64 70 77
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 70.00% 66.00% 77.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.12 1.22 1.33

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
6,695
7,245
8,319
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 163 197 187
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 558 577 594
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,130 2,336 2,620
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,970 2,093 2,339
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,417 1,596 1,986
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 457 446 593
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 20.60% 27.10% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 9,316 9,159
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 235,031 237,335
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 179 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 431 504 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $22,923,000 $22,690,000 $22,743,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $65,460,000 $60,875,000 $59,921,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $103,492,000 $99,599,000 $96,127,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $14,235,000 $9,643,000 $11,564,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 22.00% 21.00% 18.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,114 2,069 2,797
Number of people served in facility based work. 7,108 6,824 7,289
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 7,755 7,667 7,959
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 60.00 54.90 52.90

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 61.91% 63.54% 65.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.97% 9.75% 9.56%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.23% 1.40% 1.43%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.75% 98.92% 99.65%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 29.80% 27.51% 27.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.40% 64.94% 64.51%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 72.90% 77.56% 77.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.60% 37.43% 37.36%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,759,088
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 269,729
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,118,183
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,387,912
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 410
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 862
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,272
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,894,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $16,572,273

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 16 9 4
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 2 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 72 74 62
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 4 6 5
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 94 89 71
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 25 19 5
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 24 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 9,156 9,578 6,253
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 451 488 301
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 9,656 10,085 6,559

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

The DVR, DPI, and DHS will continue joint sponsorship of training events focused on improving transition and vocational rehabilitation services. In addition to the agreement–specific training, DVR staffs are encouraged to attend other transition–focused trainings to increase their knowledge of transition issues and processes. The DVR supports attendance of staff at the annual Wisconsin Transition Conference, Employment First, Transition Academy and the annual Rehabilitation and Transition Conference, as a means to increase coordination of services and transition service delivery skills.

The DVR’s Statewide Transition Action and Resource Team (START), consisting of one primary and one alternate representative from each of the 11 VR workforce development service areas, act as local transition experts and technical assistance resource. START members will continue to provide training, technical assistance and consultation to staff in their respective service areas. The team’s goals also include improving individualized engagement of students with disabilities and their parents in the transition/ VR process as well as increasing engagement of schools in transition services. A continued focus for the START team will be to identify specific needs of DVR staff related to the provision of services to transition–aged youth and develop strategies and tools to address those needs. (Page 207-208)

DVR believes that all individuals that apply and seek assistance have the ability and desire to work. DVR commits itself to assisting disabled individuals with achieving dignity through work. Consistent with our mission, and our values, DVR, as expressed in public hearings and stakeholder feedback sessions, agrees that “employment first” reflects DVR’s core set of principles and practices that promote individualized planning and support for employment options for all disabled individuals and that it is the primary goal of our services.

The WRC assists the DVR in the preparation of the State Plan and amendments to the plan, applications, reports, needs assessments and evaluations required by the Rehabilitation Act and subsequent amendments.

The WRC has committees that assume duties assigned to the Council in the Rehabilitation Act. The WRC Evaluation Committee studies VR performance in serving specific groups of disabled individuals and reviews consumer satisfaction survey responses. The WRC Reports Committee develops the WRC Annual Report and assists with the development of the State Plan. The Executive Committee oversees the work of the Council and assures that Council functions and responsibilities are carried out. (Page 218)

Customized Employment

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Pages 186)

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic

Self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 189)

Customized Employment services can be used if an individual has not been successful utilizing typical supported employment services.

Supported Employment services in Wisconsin utilize a consumer centered resource team. This team includes the DVR consumer, DVR staff, the Supported Employment service provider, the special education or other teacher, long–term support case manager, the guardian or anyone else the consumer chooses to invite.

DVR will develop and implement printed materials and provide outreach and technical assistance to schools and families to share supported employment and other resources for employment related services.

DVR has identified some sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children’s waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long–term support. (Page 191)

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 219)

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Page 221)

  • Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long–term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees
  • Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model is expanding and will be available in more than 13 counties. The model is a systems change approach to provide employment using evidence based practice elements in the treatment of serious and persistent mental illness. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. IPS in Wisconsin also incorporates learning collaborative which collects data, sets outcome goals and provides ongoing technical assistance. (Page 225)
  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.
  • DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services (SES) as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee–for–service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community–based SES and LTES in lieu of center–based extended employment. (Page 226)

In FY 2016-2017 there is a plan to emphasize building capacity and improving the quality of the existing provider network. DVR has updated and strengthened the technical specifications for services, which include identification of specific roles, and responsibilities for the consumer, DVR and the service providers. We expect to provide training for providers that will include use of new methodologies for job development and on the job supports, taking some evidence based strategies

From Individual Placement and Support (IPS) and incorporating them into supported employment services. DVR will also be creating a standardized statewide service for customized employment. DVR will continue to explore strategies to identify new providers and to work with the existing provider network to increase capacity.

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 219)

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Page 221)

  • Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long–term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees.
  • Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model is expanding and will be available in more than 13 counties. The model is a systems change approach to provide employment using evidence based practice elements in the treatment of serious and persistent mental illness. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. IPS in Wisconsin also incorporates learning collaborative which collects data, sets outcome goals and provides ongoing technical assistance. (Page 225)
  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.
  • DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services (SES) as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee–for–service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community–based SES and LTES in lieu of center–based extended employment. ( Page 226)

From Individual Placement and Support (IPS) and incorporating them into supported employment services. DVR will also be creating a standardized statewide service for customized employment. DVR will continue to explore strategies to identify new providers and to work with the existing provider network to increase capacity.

DVR also has a goal to continue to expand the (IPS) model of supported employment for individual with serious and persistent mental illness in Wisconsin. This goal has been met. The number of sites has grown from three sites in 2010, to more than 22 in FY 15. It is expected that IPS will continue to grow across Wisconsin. DVR is an active partner in that effort.

(3) The VR program’s performance on the performance accountability indicators under section 12016 of WIOA.

A. Percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program. (Page 242)

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

DVR participated in a research study, which looked at Motivational Interviewing skills and how those skills impact the relationship between consumers and the VR counselor. This study was sponsored by TACE5 and supported by University of Wisconsin Madison and several private consultants. Since FFY 2013 over 188 counselors, 27 DVR supervisors and several Central Office Staff were trained. The results of this research have shown Motivational Interviewing to be very promising and DVR will continue to provide training as both a professional development tool as well as a counselor retention effort.

DVR has partners with the Promise Grant to expand training in "trauma–informed care" and reviewing additional opportunities to add to new and continuing staff training. More training will also be provided to advance "rapid engagement" with consumers to ensure a better and faster attachment to the labor force using techniques such as those demonstrated through IPS. This should also ensure smaller caseloads for counselors. (Page 204)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The one–stop delivery system’s compliance with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act is ensured through Wisconsin’s submittal of its Methods of Administration (MOA) to the US DOL’s Civil Rights Center.

The State of Wisconsin, Department of Workforce Development, Division of Employment and Training was first required to submit a Method of Administration (MOA) under the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) in 1984. These requirements continued in 1993 under the regulations implementing the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of JTPA as set forth in 29 CFR Part §34.33. The MOA requirements have remained substantially the same under 29 CFR Part §37.54(a) which also required the Governor to establish and maintain an MOA for the State. The most recent updated MOA submitted to the DOL Office of Compliance and Policy (OCP), Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management (OASAM) that describe the State of Wisconsin plan to meet the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of Section 188 of WIOA and its implementing regulations at 29 CFR Part §37 was submitted on December 18, 2014. New WIOA regulations that apply to equal opportunity and nondiscrimination recently changed from 29 CFR Part §37 to 29 CFR Part §38. The OCP acknowledged receipt of the MOA on January 23, 2015 which covers us from December 21, 2014 through December 21, 2016. Wisconsin is currently operating under the current MOA; however, we must review the MOA and the manner in which we have implemented our MOA to determine if any changes or updates are required prior to December 21, 2016. Wisconsin DWD–DET will update its MOA prior to December 21, 2016 in accordance to 29 CFR Part §38.54 WIOA funded sub–recipients of DET must comply with the same elements addressed in the State’s MOA. Additionally, contracts/grants funded under WIOA include equal opportunity nondiscrimination assurance language obligating the sub–recipient to comply with DWD–DET’s provision contained in the MOA, (Page 86)

Every WDB is required to ensure compliance with section 188 of WIOA in the Local WIOA Plan. For PY15 DWD took the new step of requiring that local WDBs consult with the local Independent Living Center regarding the local job centers. DWD’s intention in including that requirement was to facilitate more meaningful relationships between the WDBs and these important stakeholders. As the bookend to the program administration year, each WDB is monitored by the WIOA Civil Rights Compliance Officer to ensure that plans are being implemented. Wisconsin’s one–stop center certification policy has not yet been finalized. Additional descriptions will be placed here upon issuance. (Page 87-88)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

As a Round 2 DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed this 3–year, $2,330,000 demonstration project designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource supports improves the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6–month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post–DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin.

During the extension period, DEI focused on: 

  • Ensuring accessibility in all eleven Workforce Development Areas
    • Pilot areas:
      • WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues addressed
    • Control areas:
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered opportunity for American with Disabilities Act (ADA) inspections. Resulted in 8 inspections in 3 WDAs being completed;
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI. Resulted in 9 Job Centers in 4 WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, and specialized keyboards, etc.
    • All WDAs:
      • 49 Job Centers will have identical set up of new CPU, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology equipment.
  • Developing capacity to deliver awareness– and knowledge–building training to workforce staff, employers, and the public:
    • Piloted hybrid training that mixed live WebEx and in–person training. Presentations were recorded and will be available online through the Learning Center for Wisconsin public training and Cornerstone internal training platforms. Topics: Creating a Mentally Healthy Workplace (for employers) and Hmong Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity;
    • Developed a mental health stigma–reduction series of online training specifically for workforce development staff;
    • Developed a series of disability–related online training modules, currently in post–production preparation. Topics: Using the Assistive Technology on the JCW Computers, Disability Etiquette, How Disabilities Can Affect Job Seekers, Developing Cultural Competence, Learning Disabilities, Invisible Disabilities, Effective Communication with Job Seekers, and Employees with Disabilities. (Page 87)

Wisconsin’s participation in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) has well–positioned the state for continued physical and programmatic compliance. As a Round 2 DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed this 3–year, $2,330,000 demonstration project designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource supports improves the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6–month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post–DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin. (Page 117)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

During the extension period, DEI focused on: 

  • Ensuring accessibility in all eleven Workforce Development Areas
    • Pilot areas:
      • WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues addressed
    • Control areas:
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered opportunity for American with Disabilities Act (ADA) inspections. Resulted in 8 inspections in 3 WDAs being completed;
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI. Resulted in 9 Job Centers in 4 WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, and specialized keyboards, etc.
    • All WDAs:
      • 49 Job Centers will have identical set up of new CPU, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology equipment. 
  • Developing capacity to deliver awareness– and knowledge–building training to workforce staff, employers, and the public:
    • Piloted hybrid training that mixed live WebEx and in–person training. Presentations were recorded and will be available online through the Learning Center for Wisconsin public training and Cornerstone internal training platforms.

Topics: Creating a Mentally Healthy Workplace (for employers) and Hmong Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity;

  • Developed a mental health stigma–reduction series of online training specifically for workforce development staff;
  • Developed a series of disability–related online training modules, currently in post–production preparation.

Topics: Using the Assistive Technology on the JCW Computers, Disability Etiquette, How Disabilities Can Affect Job Seekers, Developing Cultural Competence, Learning Disabilities, Invisible Disabilities, Effective Communication with Job Seekers, and Employees with Disabilities. (Page 87)

Wisconsin is particularly interested in properly carrying out the financial literacy element. Under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant, staff training on asset development was created and delivered to WIA staff in the grant’s six pilot regions. The training included community-based asset development resources, relevant to the WDA that identified the resources. Although each local asset development guide focused on resources for job seekers with disabilities, many of the resources are also appropriate for individuals without disabilities.

Wisconsin’s DEI participation provided a solid start, and statewide creation and adoption of the guide is in progress. Web-based staff training will follow. The web-based training will focus on increasing awareness of what financial literacy is the impact of it on individuals at different stages of life, and how to find appropriate federal, state and local community-based services for job seekers. The training will be appropriate for and available to staff in WIOA Youth, Adult, and Dislocated Worker Programs as well as other partners. ( Page 117)

WRC Recommendation 7

We request updates on the PROMISE grant at our quarterly meetings to learn and share best practices on working with youth with disabilities. 

DSU Response:

DVR very much looks forward to sharing with the council the progress of all pilots and projects and steps taken by DVR to improve our services and outcomes. 

WRC Recommendation 8 (Page 172)

Most importantly, DVR has collaborated with the Board for People with Developmental Disabilities, the Department of Health Services, and the Department of Public Instruction on a pilot grant program designed to improve transition services by offering career and work experience while in high school. The “Let’s Get to Work” grant allowed a best practice to be developed between special education, DVR and long–term care providers to offer employment focused transition plans for developmental disabled students. The Promise Grant, where Wisconsin is one of six federal demonstration sites, further expands this collaboration and focus on youth.

DVR has a collaborative project with the Great Lakes Inter–Tribal Council as an Innovation and Expansion option. Three tribal entities are currently working with DVR to "Place and Train" Wisconsin DVR consumers in tribal businesses. (Page 172)

Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WDVR will pilot approaches, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development. (Page 189)

Use of systematic instruction principles will be piloted and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.

Supported Employment funds will be provided to youth with significant disabilities needing supported employment to utilize at least 10% of the budget required by WIOA. The remaining funds will be provided to adults with significant disabilities. It is expected that WDVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI VR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services. The WDVR case management system has the ability to identify cases and expend the funds allotted as required by RSA.

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including Individual Placement and Support (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). (Page 190)

In Wisconsin, extended service funding is available through Managed Care and County funded mental health services. DVR is planning to pilot systematic instruction principles and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.

It is expected that WDVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI VR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services.

DVR has a policy in place for the coordination of IEP’s and IPE’s prior to graduation and prior to that when necessary. In the past, service and treatment plans with long–term care and mental health were coordinated and services identified and funding responsibilities determined. Due to the nature and scope of the changes expected in the long–term care system in Wisconsin, it is difficult to know how this will be accomplished but it is expected that treatment and service plans will continue to include and involve active collaboration with DVR. (Page 192)

DVR partnered with the Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI) to provide training for individuals with disabilities in a retail setting. This national program began its pilot in Milwaukee–area Walgreens retail locations in 2012 and is now a statewide initiative.

Building on the success of the REDI model, also called place and train, DVR offered the place and train model with other businesses and is currently working with businesses throughout Wisconsin to implement this model in their workplaces. 

Additionally, DVR has become the Point of Contact for Kwik Trip in all its Wisconsin convenience stores. DVR also works to meet the talent needs through our National Employment Team with employers such as Meijer, Wells Fargo, and Amazon. (Page 194)

Eligibility Pilot: Beginning in 2015, DVR contracted with the University of Wisconsin–Stout Vocational Rehabilitation Institute (SVRI) for an eligibility review process, authorizing SVRI to collect and make recommendations to appropriate DVR staff for eligibility and OOS determinations. This pilot is anticipated to free up to 15% of the counselor’s time to refocus on direct consumer employment plan activities. This pilot, therefore, anticipates that additional staff will be retained who experience "case burnout" from process activities. The data in Table 1 shows the number of permanent authorized FTEs by personnel category and the current vacancies in each category as of April 2014. However, we anticipate a vacancy rate of 5% during the 5 year projection period, (combination of past and current budget instructions). DVR anticipates maintaining adequate resources both in fiscal and staff resources to ensure a sustainable caseload. In December 2013, Act 58 provided funding for 9 additional VR Counselor positions. Table 1 Row Job Title Total positions Projected vacancies over the next 5 years 1 VR Counselor 196 10 2 Consumer Case Coordinator 69 3 3 Field Managers/Supervisors 25 1 4 Central Office Senior Leadership/ Managers 7 3 5 Central Office Staff Support 25 1 6 Total 322 18

DVR will continue to maintain an average employment plan caseload of 16,500, not to exceed 17,000, during FFY 2016–20. During the 5 year caseload projection period, the counselor caseload ratio should continue to comply with the DVR’s goal of not more than 100 consumers with active IPEs per counselor per month, recognizing that another 20–25% are individuals in applicant or plan development. ( Page 198)

Supported Employment funds will be provided to youth with significant disabilities needing supported employment to utilize at least 10% of the budgetary required by WIOA. The remaining funds will be provided to adults with significant disabilities. It is expected that WI DVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI DVR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services. Use of systematic instruction principles will be piloted and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.  (Page 219)

Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports. ( Page 221)

  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports. (Page 226)

DVR entered into an agreement with the Department of Health Services to pilot a new comprehensive approach for the provision of supported employment to individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness called individual placement and support (IPS). The Wisconsin IPS system change grant partnership with Dartmouth College Community Mental Health Program provides funds for mental health care employment service expansion and technical assistance. As part of the 3–year initiative, DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population.  DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population. (Page 236)

3) Develop and implement a plan to increase available supported employment resources. The DVR plan is to increase coordination with other funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care long term funding and services, and increase the number of supported employment providers in targeted areas of the state. The BPDD pilot “Let’s Get to Work” for transition students also holds great promise as a template for adult braided services and further collaboration with the state’s long–term care program. (Page 239)

The following table and narrative highlights the innovation and expansion activity supported by DVR funds in FFY15. Innovation and expansion activities are generally funded in accordance with DVR’s state fiscal year (i.e., July 1 – June 30) but may be conducted on a federal fiscal year if applicable. Contract / Agreement Start/End DVR funds Fiscal Arrangement and Type 8 local I and E projects with CIL’s 7/1/2010–6/30/13 $15,000 each location annually Each CIL worked with the local WDA Director to develop new patterns of services to be provided to DVR Consumers. Projects include: Assistive Technology work evaluation services, peer assisted job search instruction, financial literacy training and youth job groups. REDI Walgreen’s 4/1/12–6/30/13 $18,600 for site creation. Case service funds for direct consumer services. Intensive retail training with supports and competency based certification for potential hire with corporate partners. Let’s Get to Work 2/1/12–6/30/15 Case Service funds via Youth OJT DVR has committed and created a youth transition OJT to attach youth with disabilities to competitive employment prior to HS completion. Vocational Futures Planning Services 10/1/12 –9/30/15 Case Service funds Collaborative effort with long term care and other providers to provider individualized–based services, including case management services, to people with significant physical disabilities that are in need of long term care. Milwaukee Wrap Around Pilot 6/1/20132013 –9/30/ 2015 $350,500 annually Mentor program to establish resources and services to assist in employment. Innovation and Expansion—Place and Train Models. (Page 244)

DVR partnered with the Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI) to provide training for individuals with disabilities in a retail setting. This national program began its pilot in Milwaukee–area Walgreens retail locations in 2012 and is now a statewide initiative.

Building on the success of the REDI model, also called place and train, DVR offered the place and train model with other businesses and is currently working with businesses throughout Wisconsin to implement this model in their workplaces.

As required under section 101(a)(15)(E)(ii) of the Act, the Wisconsin Rehabilitation Council (WRC) and the DVR annually jointly prepare and submit to the RSA Commissioner a report on the activities and progress of the DVR in meeting its goals and priorities. This report is known as the annual Wisconsin Rehabilitation Council report. (Page 245)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Wisconsin is particularly interested in properly carrying out the financial literacy element. Under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant, staff training on asset development was created and delivered to WIA staff in the grant’s six pilot regions. The training included community-based asset development resources, relevant to the WDA that identified the resources. Although each local asset development guide focused on resources for job seekers with disabilities, many of the resources are also appropriate for individuals without disabilities. (Page 117)

  • information, services, assistance, assessments and job searching
  • computer and technology skill enhancement
  • resume development
  • interview skills
  • GED assistance
  • Educational opportunities
  • Short term training
  • Career assessments and exploration
  • Referrals to organizations for a variety of financial literacy information or services
  • Resource Room assistance
  • Computer access for job searching, writing and printing of resumes, online employment applications and assistance
  • Skill Explorer – the State skill matching system that links skill sets to current employment opportunities locally, regionally and statewide
  • Outreach – which can include meeting clients at itinerant locations, career and job fairs; local libraries
  1. Registering on Job Center of Wisconsin also provides the opportunity to receive e–blasts which provide information on Job Fairs, hiring events
  2. Claimants can utilize Skill Explorer which assists in matching skill sets to current job openings, including location and rates of pay (Page 128)

After the Division is assured that eligible individuals are adequately supported in their employment plan costs, and that Title I–B funds have been used to activate individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities from the OOS wait list in a timely manner, up to 2% of Title I–B case aids funds may be used for other allowable purposes, including innovation and expansion services. The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is currently focusing on programs that expand financial literacy, job development, youth services, and underserved tribal populations. Each program was created to address specific local needs in respective WDAs. Topics include: banking basics, car purchases, budgeting, understanding credit, employment barriers, online applications, social skills, temporary work experiences, self–advocacy, and obtaining gainful employment. Throughout the year, quarterly reports are due to DVR for review of progress and scope. It is anticipated for these services to transition from I&E funding to fee–for–service agreements upon successful effective completion. (Page 229)

Specialized Innovation and Expansion Projects In WDA 1, 5 and 8 there are financial literacy projects that established a program to help consumers better understand fraud, identity theft, savings, budgeting, and financial stability. The cost of the combined project: $40,686.

In WDA’s 5 and 6 there was a Project in partnership with the Division of Employment and Training provides comprehensive, individualized and value added services to DVR consumers. It adds optimizing opportunities to stay competitive in the inclusive marketplace. The cost of the project $148,218 (Page 243)

The following table and narrative highlights the innovation and expansion activity supported by DVR funds in FFY15. Innovation and expansion activities are generally funded in accordance with DVR’s state fiscal year (i.e., July 1 – June 30) but may be conducted on a federal fiscal year if applicable. Contract / Agreement Start/End DVR funds Fiscal Arrangement and Type 8 local I and E projects with CIL’s 7/1/2010–6/30/13 $15,000 each location annually Each CIL worked with the local WDA Director to develop new patterns of services to be provided to DVR Consumers. Projects include: Assistive Technology work evaluation services, peer assisted job search instruction, financial literacy training and youth job groups. REDI Walgreen’s 4/1/12–6/30/13 $18,600 for site creation. Case service funds for direct consumer services. Intensive retail training with supports and competency based certification for potential hire with corporate partners. Let’s Get to Work 2/1/12–6/30/15 Case Service funds via Youth OJT DVR has committed and created a youth transition OJT to attach youth with disabilities to competitive employment prior to HS completion. Vocational Futures Planning Services 10/1/12 –9/30/15 Case Service funds Collaborative effort with long term care and other providers to provider individualized–based services, including case management services, to people with significant physical disabilities that are in need of long term care. Milwaukee Wrap Around Pilot 6/1/20132013 –9/30/ 2015 $350,500 annually Mentor program to establish resources and services to assist in employment. Innovation and Expansion—Place and Train Models. (Page 244)

Benefits

Cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include: 

  • 1,637 Job Center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals external to the Job Centers;
  • 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks;
  • 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period;
  • 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 87)

The One–Stop system will ensure access to services or programs to English language learners (ELLs) by providing program information in alternate languages and formats through use of interpreters, translation, and other methods, as necessary and appropriate. Services to ELLs will be provided at the time and in a manner that avoids the imposition of an undue burden on or delay in receiving important benefits or services. As needed, clients in need of English Language Learning services will be will be connected with partner providers at a technical college or community based literacy organization.(Page 89)

If an entity other than the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation fails to provide or pay for comparable benefits or services for an eligible individual, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation shall provide or pay for such services to the individual.

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation will claim reimbursement for the services from the entity that failed to provide or pay for such services. Such entity shall reimburse the DVR pursuant to the terms of the interagency agreement or other mechanism described in this paragraph according to the procedures established in such agreement or mechanism.

Agency partners involved in the interagency agreements specifying the coordination of service procedures are described in this attachment. A DVR services coordination agreement may involve coordinated use of interagency funds. The service delivery timeframes within the Act and those referenced in the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual shall establish the minimum standard for the timely delivery of vocational rehabilitation services. At its discretion, the Division may create additional requirements for the coordination and timely delivery of services when establishing mechanisms for interagency coordination that affect the delivery of services.( Page 177)

The Wisconsin DOC has awarded a Benefits Specialist Program to Legal Action of Wisconsin (LAW). The project, Disabled Offenders Economic Security (DOES) Project, will work with the 13 DOC institutions identified as having the highest number of inmates with serious mental illness and DD, to ensure that disabled offenders receive their benefits during the re– entry process, including employment and DVR referrals. (Page 178)

DVR employs an outcome based statewide fee structure with technical specifications for commonly used and available services. Statewide rates and technical specifications established for the services most commonly purchased from non–profit vocational rehabilitation service providers include: benefits analysis, internship/temporary work, job coaching, job preparation, development and placement, supported employment, vocational evaluation, and IPS supported employment, assistive technology assessment and services. Agencies wishing to provide these services sign a fee–for–service agreement with DVR. The statewide rates, technical specifications for services, service provider agreement and the providers that have a signed agreement with DVR are posted on the DVR public website. Other service agreements may be developed as required and appropriate. Agencies are must renew annual and sign service provider agreements for each new State Fiscal Year. (Page 187)

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits.(Page 198- 190)

DVR has identified some sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children’s waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long–term support. (Page 191)

  • Long–term support for people who do not qualify for these supports based on IQ – for example, people diagnosed with autism or mental illness.
  • Improved job coaching so that coaching can fade in a reasonable and timely way.
  • Development of a mentor system for work place role models
  • Ability to address basic needs before or during rehabilitation e.g. food shelter, basic medical care.
  • Improved use of appropriate work skills evaluation tools
  • Support of business community for developing a work environment friendly to individuals with disabilities, e.g. need for part time employment, preservation of benefits, flexibility, volunteer work.
  • Support of wrap around services not just on the job, e.g. transportation.
  • Need to change the long term support system to a managed care approach to retain and expand funding for long–term supported employment services
  • Need to orient the long term care system toward a “money follows the person” approach
  • Development of natural supports, in lieu of funded long–term extended services
  • Expansion of peer support specialists for individuals with mental illness.
  • Informational services regarding various options and programs for families.
  • More and better targeted career information to address the attitude that there are no jobs that persons with disabilities can do
  • Increased need for soft skill preparation to expand employment opportunities
  • Increased education for business community re: the business benefits of hiring our consumers
  • Expanded work incentives and increased access to benefits advisement
  • Need for expanded work incentive demonstrations to more fully address the number of consumers experiencing disincentive to full employment (e.g., SSDI $2/$1 benefit offset and “Making Work Pay” cost–share demonstration)
  • DVR Administrator to continue to provide quarterly updates on the wait list numbers to the Council as recommended. (Page 210) 

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits.

Programmatic Goal 5: DVR will meet and exceed the expenditure requirement under WOIA requiring at least 50% of supported employment funds on youth with significant disabilities.  (Page 219)

The DVR continues to utilize technical specifications and fee schedules in the provision of services provided by Community Rehabilitation Programs including: job development, supported employment, job coaching, benefits analysis, and vocational evaluation. In addition, the DVR conducts regular meetings with vendors of these services for feedback, clarification and ongoing compliance and improvement of services.

DVR will continue to provide an OJT affirmative hiring initiative to assist employers with the initial cost of training a hired DVR job seeker. DVR area managers train CRP job–placement staff on the use of the OJT initiative. CRP job placement staff is encouraged to use the OJT initiative when they speak to employers about hiring DVR job seekers. (Page 233)

At the service delivery level, in the State of Wisconsin the TAA program integrates our employment and training program activities in coordination with other workforce entities such as WIOA Dislocated Worker Program, Veterans Program, Technical Colleges; within the established One–Stop Job Center (workforce development) delivery system. TAA staff maintains communication to all partners in the Job Center by attending staff meetings & Rapid Response sessions, and have an active role with key functions within the Job Center. By attending Job Center staff meetings, partners are provided updates on TAA legislation, new petition filings and certifications, and upcoming Trade Intake events happening in their WDA. Local Job Service TAA staff will be present at all Trade Intake sessions. In addition, partner entities (WIOA, Veteran, Technical Colleges, etc.) will be invited to participate in the Intake in order to increase the likelihood of co–enrollment or dual–enrollment, and dates and times are coordinated as meeting arrangements are being made. WIOA will maintain a working knowledge of TAA benefits and services in order to provide these services to co–enrolled participants through WIOA case management. (Page 261)

All newly hired LVER or DVOP staff will complete on–line distance learning regarding veteran’s benefits. This training is provided by NVTI Training Solutions, a DOLVETS sponsored training provider. All FTE staff will be required to attend Facilitating Veteran Employment training offered by NVTI. In addition, LVER will receive training on employer outreach. DVOPs will receive training on Facilitating Veteran Employment and Intensive Services. All LVER or DVOP training will be provided within 18 months of hire. Staff will receive instructions on all data entry from DWD/OVS supervisor. Specific Webinar necessary training will be provided to LVER and DVOP staff by DWD. All DWD/OVS will receive additional training requested by staff or DWD management through Cornerstone. (Page 275)

School to Work Transition

DVR staff attends Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings, with consent from the student and family. DVR is also available to provide information and technical assistance on transition services to teachers, parents, and other organizations and councils.

As outlined in the TAG and the DVR Policy the development of the plan for employment for students who are eligible for plan development, is to occur prior to the student leaving school. DVR staff and educators are encouraged to coordinate the provision of services and transition activities for students who are eligible for both IEP and an IPE services to assist them in transitioning from school to work.

The DVR Statewide Transition Action and Resource Team (START), supported by the interagency agreement, have the role to improve consistency and engagement in the transition process. The DVR START team and the DPI Wisconsin Transition Improvement Grant (TIG) also collaborate to improve consistency in the provision of service to youth with disabilities as they transition from school to post high school activities that include VR services. TIG provides technical assistance to school districts, Cooperative Educational School Districts (CESA) and county Transition Advisory Councils, including, information dissemination and participation in staff development activities. The Interagency Agreement also supports TIG. DVR START and TIG also collaborate to provide training regarding the Interagency Agreement. (Page 185)

  • DVR conducts regular collaborative meetings and activity with sources of long term support including managed care organizations, self–directed managed care and county programs to facilitate referrals, service coordination and increase outcomes.
  • DVR is a strong partner in the Board for People with Developmental Disabilities and their “Let’s Get to Work” pilot to strengthen career and job attachments for high school transition students. Outcome goals include:
    • Changes in policy that increase community employment for youth with I/DD
    • Increases in integrated, community employment rates of youth with I/DD o Changes in stakeholder attitudes about the employability of youth with I/DD
  • The federally funded PROMISE grant and Let’s Get to Work are comprised of 4 main areas: 
  1. Consortium of 70 key stakeholders who identify policy issues and includes a youth track,
  2. A policy team that takes the work of the Consortium and strategizes way to implement policy changes,
  3. 9 school pilot sites implementing evidence based practices and identifying barriers to employment, and
  4. Coaches who provide intense, on–site technical assistance to the school sites. (Page 226)
Data Collection

No specific disability related information found.

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Business services professionals representing various programs and services serve on a local Business services Team, and use a shared business relationship (account) management system in order to effectively communicative activities with businesses in real-time. DVR is represented on local business service teams primarily through its business service consultants. Business Services professionals participate in collaborative training with other partners.

DVR participated in planning and attending the annual Collaborate conference which brings business services professionals and business together to discuss needs, opportunities, successes and best practices.

Additionally, state agencies began convening in PY15 at the direction of Governor Walker to create a one-stop portal for businesses to ensure that all employers, including small businesses, can learn about available services and programs. While this project is in early stages, it has the potential to be invaluable to helping businesses find talent. (Page 52)

Career Pathways

Guidance and support will be provided statewide at the agency level by the Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee. Financial resources will be provided, in part, through the TAACCCT Exceeding the Cap project, funded by DOL and called Advancing Careers of TAA and Transitions or ACT2. The Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee includes representation from the WTCS, DWD, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI), the Wisconsin Workforce Development Association (WWDA), and the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC). The active participation of the partners of the Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee ensures that career pathways in Wisconsin are industry-driven and support students and job seekers of all ages, backgrounds, and abilities. (Page 33)

WIOA requirements of service provider report cards will be made possible through data sharing. Partners will gather and analyze data, synthesize it into reports, share findings with other partners, and facilitate discussions for improvements. Once data sharing capabilities are established, partners will make the report cards easily accessible to job seekers, WIOA core partners, and the public. Each partner will ensure that its own staff is kept trained on how to access and use the report cards. All core partners’ services, including Career Pathways and ABE/High School Equivalency Diploma, will be part of the service provider report card offerings. (Page 35)

The State is a recognized national leader in career pathways beginning in Basic Skills, moving through post-secondary coursework (concurrently in early courses) and resulting in post-secondary credential attainment. Over 52% of students who enter the system through ABE/ELL enroll in post-secondary coursework in the same or following academic year.

Career Pathways offer an efficient and customer-centered approach to training and education by successfully articulating the appropriate secondary, ABE, postsecondary education and training, career and academic advising and supportive services to enter and progress in a career.

Career Pathway; a series of connected education and training strategies and support services that enable individuals to secure industry relevant certification and obtain employment within an occupational area and to advance to higher levels of future education and employment in that area.

Registered Apprenticeship Access to Postsecondary Credentials is improved with the increased collaboration through the WTCS and Career Pathways…etc.

In addition, this access is strengthened with the increased partnership with apprenticeship in several areas.  (Page 55)

  • Research-based activities such as the STAR reading program (Wisconsin has trained 186 ABE teachers in the STAR approach, and this group has an active web-based learning community)
  • Adult Numeracy Initiative training
  • Preparing to Achieve training
  • Contextualizing the GED training (WTCS-developed)
  • Extensive Career Pathway and Career Pathway Bridge training for both ABE and ELL (The WTCS has hundreds of career pathways identified, and many of these have integrated ABE/occupational Career Pathway Bridges attached)
  • Training in connecting as many partners as possible into our career pathways approach (through Wisconsin’s Moving Pathways Forward initiative).
  • Training in the use of the CCRS-aligned WTCS ABE curriculum standards (required of all grantees) (Page 161)
Employment Networks

Cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include: 

  • 1,637 Job Center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals external to the Job Centers;
  • 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks;
  • 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period;
  • 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 87)
  • DVR will continue to promote the “Partnership Plus” opportunities in the Ticket to Work (TTW) program. DVR will share information with eligible Ticket holders on post–VR services and supports available through assignment of their Ticket to an approved employment network provider.  (Page 227)

Policies and Initiatives

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Wisconsin Employment First Grant Recipients - 09/22/2017

“The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities awarded Employment First Partner grants to 14 community organizations, including: schools, employment providers, managed care organizations, and advocacy organizations.  These organizations will work in their local communities to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Activities will include:  legislative breakfasts, Take Your Legislator to Work visits, business recognition events; leadership mentoring, media campaigns, public service announcements, commercials, community conversations, presentations to local civic groups (e.g., chambers, Rotary clubs) and employer groups, business tours, and business to business mentoring.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 08/01/2017

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

WI Project SEARCH - 07/01/2017

“Project SEARCH is a business led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration. A 9-12 month program, Project SEARCH provides total immersion in a large community business. Students with disabilities are offered a workforce alternative for their last year of high school. All participants must be eligible for services with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). At some sites, young adults who have completed high school may be eligible to participate in Project SEARCH.

The Project SEARCH partnership includes a local high status business, a school, DVR, a vocational services agency and a disability services agency, such as a managed care organization. The business provides an on-site training classroom, business liaison and rotational internships for on the job training. The school provides an instructor. DVR works with a local vocational services agency to supply job coaches who support students in their internships as needed and assist with final job placement. The disability services agency provides follow along services for any eligible student who is hired at the business site or in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 04/05/2017

“This year’s conference title is Embracing Change: Together We Make It Happen. The conference focuses on the changes happening at the state and federal level and how these changes will significantly increase integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. …

Change provides both opportunities and challenges. This conference brings together individuals with disabilities, family members, state vocational rehabilitation counselors, employment providers, policy makers, and educators to learn and share creative ways to address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Department of Health Services Guiding Principles for Competitive Integrated Employment for People with Disabilities in Long-term Care - 04/01/2017

“The Department of Health Services (DHS) has established a list of Guiding Principles that build on the value of full inclusion of people with disabilities served in our long-term care programs. These principles are evidence-based practices that align with our vision for the future for people with disabilities in our communities. We recognize that each person’s path toward competitive integrated employment involves a person-centered planning process that includes a variety of experiences to build toward successful jobs.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 02/17/2017

“Supported employment services are provided in a working alliance with many partners. Communication is the key to success between these partners. Use of issued agency guidance, technical assistance guides, and policies and regulations is encouraged to build collaboration.

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 10/01/2016

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 02/15/2016

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR in 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Supported Employment Fees/Customized Employment - 10/01/2015

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development chart of supported employment and customized employment fees.   It details the Supported Employment Service, and the fee for each service.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WI Statutes: Vocational Rehabilitation; Specialized Programs for Persons with Disabilities - 08/26/2015

This WI statute defines persons with disabilities and explains Vocational Rehabilitation and “special programs for persons with disabilities.” It states that the State will, “Make vocational rehabilitation services under this chapter available in every county to all persons with disabilities who are present in the state, regardless of residency,” and details the services that will be available to people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Wisconsin SB 21 (Act 55) - 07/12/2015

"Senate Bill 21 as 2015 Wisconsin Act 55 is approved and deposited in the office of the Secretary of State...The following is a brief summary of how this budget, including my vetoes, will continue to make Wisconsin more prosperous, more independent and more efficient...Newly establishes Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) accounts to empower the disabled community and their families to achieve greater independence and assist with various expenses."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Wisconsin Fair Employment Act

Wisconsin's Fair Employment Law gives civil rights protections to qualified persons with disabilities. The law applies to virtually all, private and public employers, regardless of the number of employees. Under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), disability discrimination is also prohibited for employers having 15 or more employees. Both laws are designed to ensure equal opportunity in all aspects of employment.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 08/01/2017

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Department of Health Services Guiding Principles for Competitive Integrated Employment for People with Disabilities in Long-term Care - 04/01/2017

“The Department of Health Services (DHS) has established a list of Guiding Principles that build on the value of full inclusion of people with disabilities served in our long-term care programs. These principles are evidence-based practices that align with our vision for the future for people with disabilities in our communities. We recognize that each person’s path toward competitive integrated employment involves a person-centered planning process that includes a variety of experiences to build toward successful jobs.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 02/17/2017

“Supported employment services are provided in a working alliance with many partners. Communication is the key to success between these partners. Use of issued agency guidance, technical assistance guides, and policies and regulations is encouraged to build collaboration.

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 10/01/2016

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 02/15/2016

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR in 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Supported Employment Fees/Customized Employment - 10/01/2015

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development chart of supported employment and customized employment fees.   It details the Supported Employment Service, and the fee for each service.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Transition Action Guide For Post-secondary Planning - 03/01/2015

This Transition Action Guide (TAG) was developed to support the 2007 Interagency Agreement among the Department of Workforce Development (DWD), the Department of Public Instruction (DPI), and the Department of Health Services (DHS). This guide suggests best practices and resources to assist key stakeholders (students, parents/guardians, teachers and school team members, DVR counselors, Children and Adult Long –Term Care and Mental Health professionals, and ADRC representatives) involved in the transition process. This tool can be used as a framework to improve communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

A Better Bottom Line: Governor Scott Walker Delivers Remarks at Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 04/03/2014

“Governor Walker proclaimed 2014 as the Year of A Better Bottom Line to encourage and promote employment opportunities for people with disabilities... During the Year of A Better Bottom Line, Governor Walker is directing state agencies to focus on recognizing and promoting public and private programs, companies, and organizations that are improving employment opportunities for people with disabilities, including veterans and students.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Priorities for People with Disabilities in Wisconsin

“This packet provides information and recommendations on various issues that people with disabilities face, including integrated employment, access to health care and schools, and special education funding.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Wisconsin Individual Placement and Support

IPS is an evidenced based practice model of supported employment for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. In Wisconsin the Department of Workforce Development, DVR has partnered with the Department of Health Services - Division of Mental Health to establish IPS in Wisconsin as part of a grant from Dartmouth College and Johnson and Johnson. Mental health services in Wisconsin are provided by each county. The IPS model involves a team approach involving an Employment Specialist and a DVR counselor becoming a part of a mental health treatment team, with employment becoming a focus of mental health services. Adherence to the prescribed national model is essential. Fidelity reviews are conducted until good fidelity is achieved. Technical assistance is provided as part of the grant and can be provided for counties wishing to implement IPS. Legislation has been proposed (2014) for a significant expansion of IPS availability in Wisconsin.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation: “Employment First Team” - 03/01/2015

Lists team members and headquarters as of March 2015.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Transition Interagency Agreement - 12/02/2010

This interagency agreement has been revised from the July 2007 interagency agreement to now focus on both students with disabilities transitioning from high school as well as adults with disabilities, who have an expectation for integrated competitive employment. It has also been elaborated for clarity and to reflect best practices associated with increasing employment opportunities for people with cognitive and/or physical disabilities who also have challenges with mental health. Based on recommendations made by a statewide employment task force, this agreement represents the intent to fully coordinate all of the activities and programs within each agency, for every internal and external stakeholder who is striving to achieve employment for citizens with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Interagency Agreement MOU: Adults and Transitioning Youth - 12/02/2010

“This agreement between DPI, DVR, and DHS has four overall priorities supporting integrated employment: To comply with federal legal mandates under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA). To provide practical guidance, technical assistance, and training to internal and external stakeholders and staff regarding employment-related services and supports. To provide information on employment services to individuals with disabilities and their family members or guardians so they will be able to participate fully in employment. To provide clarification of roles of stakeholders within each respective department regarding individuals with disabilities who have identified support needs associated with employment and independent living, so that individuals and their families may regard such efforts to be as seamless, non-duplicative, and as transparent as possible.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for the Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program - 11/10/2009

“The purpose of this MOU is for the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) and the Department of Children and Families, Division of Family and Economic Security, Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program to establish collaborative efforts regarding their services and to develop a common understanding regarding their roles, policies, and procedures to better serve individuals with disabilities who may benefit from services from both programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Department of Health Services’ Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF): Final Report - 07/18/2008

“Against this backdrop, the Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF) was convened in May 2007 by Division of Long-Term Care Administrator Sinikka Santala and charged with recommending a comprehensive strategy to expand work options for adults who rely on the community-based, long-term care system. The Task Force, composed of 28 members representing a wide range of interests and expertise, analyzed the challenges and identified best practices from Wisconsin and elsewhere for overcoming these challenges.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Committee for people with disability Work plan

The Governor’s Committee for People with Disabilities: • Advises the Governor and state agencies on problems faced by people with disabilities, • Reviews legislation and advises the Governor about legislation affecting people with disabilities, • Suggests to the Governor and state agencies ways to enhance the effective operations of publicity and privately administered or supported programs serving people with disabilities, • Promotes the goal of self-sufficiency for people with disabilities, • Promotes the collection, dissemination and incorporation of adequate information about persons with disabilities into public planning at all levels of government, • Promotes public awareness of needs and abilities of people with disabilities, and • Encourages the effective involvement of people with disabilities in government.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other

Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities

“Transition is helping students with disabilities and their families think about their life after high school and identify long-range goals designing the high school experience to ensure that students gain the skills and connections they need to achieve these goals the provision of funds and services to local school districts to assist in the transition process.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Survival Coalition of Wisconsin Disability Organizations

“The intention of the Wisconsin Employment First Coalition is to partner with people with disabilities, other stakeholders, businesses and the public to increase awareness of the need to provide integrated employment opportunities here in Wisconsin. Survival Coalition supports integrated employment as the presumed outcome for people with disabilities. They believe that everyone can and should work in integrated jobs.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

Wisconsin has an APSE chapter.  “WI APSE believes that a state-wide Employment First effort is a vital component to the goal of increasing employment outcomes for citizens with disabilities in a manner that promotes equality of opportunity…Between May and September 2009, WI APSE facilitated group discussions about employment opportunities in eight locations around the state.” This document is a compilation of their observations, suggestions and next steps to implementing Employment First in Wisconsin.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Employment First Community Action Team’s (CATs)

The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities and National APSE  teamed up to fund the technical assistance and training of three to five pilot “Employment First” Community Action Teams (CATs) sites round the state. “The purpose of the CATs is to implement practices around the state aligned with the Employment First Initiative to support an increased number of people with disabilities in Wisconsin to work in their communities. CATs will take the lead in implementing action plan items at a local level, setting local benchmarks, and reporting on progress.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Wisconsin Employment First Grant Recipients - 09/22/2017

“The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities awarded Employment First Partner grants to 14 community organizations, including: schools, employment providers, managed care organizations, and advocacy organizations.  These organizations will work in their local communities to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Activities will include:  legislative breakfasts, Take Your Legislator to Work visits, business recognition events; leadership mentoring, media campaigns, public service announcements, commercials, community conversations, presentations to local civic groups (e.g., chambers, Rotary clubs) and employer groups, business tours, and business to business mentoring.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

WI Project SEARCH - 07/01/2017

“Project SEARCH is a business led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration. A 9-12 month program, Project SEARCH provides total immersion in a large community business. Students with disabilities are offered a workforce alternative for their last year of high school. All participants must be eligible for services with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). At some sites, young adults who have completed high school may be eligible to participate in Project SEARCH.

The Project SEARCH partnership includes a local high status business, a school, DVR, a vocational services agency and a disability services agency, such as a managed care organization. The business provides an on-site training classroom, business liaison and rotational internships for on the job training. The school provides an instructor. DVR works with a local vocational services agency to supply job coaches who support students in their internships as needed and assist with final job placement. The disability services agency provides follow along services for any eligible student who is hired at the business site or in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2011

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project." Wisconsin received a grant to support their Rural Supported Employment and Peer Support Programs.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

MIG-RATS

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Wisconsin PROMISE Initiative

The PROMISE initiative is intended to improve services for youth SSI (Social Security Supplemental Security Income) recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI.   PROMISE is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Social Security Administration, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. Department of Labor.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Disability Employment Initiative

"The WI Disability Employment Initiative was designed to ‘improve the accessibility and accountability of the public workforce development system for individuals with disabilities,’ extending ‘promising practices implemented by disability program navigators.’ Wisconsin’s Disability Employment Initiative will ‘improve coordination and collaboration among employment and training and asset development programs carried out at a state and local level.’ Linking to the ‘Ticket to Work program,’ Wisconsin seeks to build what members of Congress termed ‘effective community partnerships that leverage public and private resources to better serve individuals with disabilities and improve employment outcomes.’”  The grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WI Disability Program Navigator

“ETA and SSA are jointly funding the DPN Initiative in 42 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the United States Virgin Islands where SSA implemented employment support initiatives. This Initiative promotes comprehensive services and work incentive information for SSA beneficiaries and other people with disabilities, through the One Stop system. The Initiative focuses on developing new and ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive, and integrated access to services, creating systemic change, and expanding the workforce development system's capacity to serve customers with disabilities and employers.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Partnerships in Employment Systems Change Grant (Let’s Get to Work)

“The Wisconsin Let’s Get to Work project is a five-year, national systems change grant that will lead to improved community employment outcomes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities in transition…Funded by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities the project focuses on improving, developing and implementing policies and practices that raise community expectations and overall employment outcomes for youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 04/05/2017

“This year’s conference title is Embracing Change: Together We Make It Happen. The conference focuses on the changes happening at the state and federal level and how these changes will significantly increase integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. …

Change provides both opportunities and challenges. This conference brings together individuals with disabilities, family members, state vocational rehabilitation counselors, employment providers, policy makers, and educators to learn and share creative ways to address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • WIOA

Family Care Integrated Employment Planning for Members with Physical Disabilities - 07/15/2015

This is a training designed to help Interdisciplinary Team (IDT) understand Family Care Integrated Employment Planning. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Action Guide For Post-secondary Planning - 03/01/2015

This Transition Action Guide (TAG) was developed to support the 2007 Interagency Agreement among the Department of Workforce Development (DWD), the Department of Public Instruction (DPI), and the Department of Health Services (DHS). This guide suggests best practices and resources to assist key stakeholders (students, parents/guardians, teachers and school team members, DVR counselors, Children and Adult Long –Term Care and Mental Health professionals, and ADRC representatives) involved in the transition process. This tool can be used as a framework to improve communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to employment.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 07/01/2014

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence. All DVR services must be provided in competitive wage and integrated settings.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

WI Self-Employment Toolkit V2.0 - 12/19/2013

“This toolkit was developed to assist DVR staff and consumers through the self-employment process. It addresses all areas of the process, from how to start the initial conversation with the consumer, through opening the business and closing the case successfully. The process outlined in this toolkit is in a 12-step format. Each step has a purpose and should be completed prior to moving on to the next step. It is expected that this process will be followed for all start-up self-employment cases.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation: Customized Self-Employment Toolkit - 08/01/2012

“This tool has been developed to assist DVR Staff throughout the exploration and development of a small business for consumers who need a customized or supported approach to self-employment. A consumer requiring a customized approach may need supports to develop and/or maintain the business. Supports could include: long term job coaching supports, ongoing case management, peer supports, natural supports, family supports or ongoing paid professional services for the business, etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Self-Directed Employment Planning Resource Guide - 07/01/2012

“This Resource Guide was designed to be used with the Self-Directed Employment Planning online modules. Since the Self-Directed Employment Planning modules are an on-line resource, website links are included as part of the Resource Guide. If you click on the website links in an electronic version of this guide from a computer, you should be able to go to each website.    This Resource Guide is set up in the same order as the training modules. There are ten sections that go with each of the ten on-line modules. You should listen to each module first and then take the time to look at the information in this Resource Guide that goes with each module.     This Resource Guide also contains helpful templates and samples that were described in the learning modules. You can use these templates in your planning. You can use parts or all of them. You can print off the pages you need and make as many copies of them as you want to use.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Department Workforce Development (DWD) and Department of Health Services (DHS) Technical Assistance Guide for Adults Seeking Integrated Employment - 12/28/2010

“This Adult Technical Assistance Guide (Adult TAG) is intended to improve communication, coordination, and services for adults with disabilities seeking integrated employment who participate in either the Family Care, Family Care Partnership, PACE or IRIS long term care programs and who are jointly eligible for Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) services. It is designed to be useful for all persons and agencies involved in the process of vocational placement and providing long term support for integrated employment.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Beach Center on Disability Research Highlights: Customized Employment - 07/15/2008

“In this study, personal and employment histories of 50 individuals with significant disabilities were examined in table format to identify trends in employment and support the validity of integrated work experiences. Personal histories included: exit year of high school, age disability label and residential support. Employment histories included work environment, time at job, work tasks, hours per week, hourly wage, professional support and reasons for changing jobs. The participants’ experiences began 15-24 years ago when they entered the services provided by Community Work Services Inc. in Madison, Wisconsin.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Self-Directed Employment Planning Modules

“This on-line series was designed to help people with disabilities think about their integrated employment options, understand employment supports, and create a plan to achieve their integrated employment goals.   There are 12 learning modules, which you can watch by clicking the links below.  Start with the introduction so that you can learn how to use this learning series.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Statewide Transition Plan (Medicaid)

The Department of Health Services (DHS) intends to transition the Community Recovery Services (CRS) program currently operating under the 1915(i) authority to a 1905(a) State Plan authority effective January 1, 2015, pending CMS approval. The DHS has issued a public notice regarding this transition under the Wisconsin State Register published November 15, 2014. If CMS does not approve the transition of the CRS program from a 1915(i) to a 1905(a) State Plan service, then DHS agrees to follow the statewide transition plan for Medicaid HCBS as outlined in this plan.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Wisconsin Medicaid State Plan

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Wisconsin's Medicaid program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Self Directed Support Waiver (IRIS)

“The IRIS Program is a Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver for self-directed long-term supports. The program is an option for adults with long term care needs. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Division of Long Term Care (DLTC), Office of IRIS Management under the authorization of the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) is responsible for oversight of the IRIS program. IRIS is available to Wisconsin residents determined financially eligible for Medicaid, functionally in need of nursing home or Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) level of care; and living in a county where managed long-term care and IRIS are available. People who are eligible have the choice of IRIS or managed care through their local Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Family Care Program

"Family Care was designed to provide cost-effective, comprehensive and flexible long-term care that will foster consumers’ independence and quality of life, while recognizing the need for interdependence and support…”

Family Care, authorized by the Governor and Legislature in 1998, serves people with physical disabilities, people with intellectual/developmental disabilities and frail elders, with the specific goals of: Giving people better choices about where they live and what kinds of services and supports they get to meet their needs; Improving access to services; Improving quality through a focus on health and social outcomes; [and] Creating a cost-effective system for the future.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Community Integration Program

“The Community Integration Program is a Medicaid Home and Community-Based Waiver for adults with developmental disabilities.”

“The CIP Waiver helps people with developmental disabilities to stay out of institutions, or to relocate from state centers and nursing homes back to their communities.  In many circumstances, CIP can help prevent someone from having to leave his/her community.  CIP is funded through the federal Medicaid Program (MA).  It is known as an "MA waiver" because the federal government has waived certain regulations, allowing Wisconsin to use the dollars to follow people to the community.  The money goes from the state to county waiver agencies who administer the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The motto of Wisconsin is "Forward," and it's clear to see that things are moving forward on Employment First initiatives that are empowering individuals with disabilities to find success in the careers they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Wisconsin’sVR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.24%
Change from
2014 to 2015
5,771,337
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.35%
Change from
2014 to 2015
351,787
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.99%
Change from
2014 to 2015
144,815
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.35%
Change from
2014 to 2015
41.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.37%
Change from
2014 to 2015
82.28%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 5,742,713 5,757,564 5,771,337
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 355,057 353,031 351,787
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 145,103 140,488 144,815
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,554,274 2,586,501 2,619,935
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.87% 39.79% 41.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.10% 81.15% 82.28%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.80% 5.50% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.80% 20.80% 20.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.40% 12.10% 11.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 338,222 339,579 333,922
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 347,572 337,992 347,167
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 591,940 582,635 585,992
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 53,913 55,258 52,516
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 31,645 33,986 34,937
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 7,921 6,434 9,262
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 9,386 10,701 10,660
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 14,399 13,328 14,097
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 8,082 8,923 8,375

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 10,442 10,674 10,982
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.40% 9.50% 9.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 160,842 161,894 161,864

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 3,395 3,562 3,683
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 6,013 5,843 5,178
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 15,779 14,613 15,603
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.50% 24.40% 23.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.40% 2.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.10% 1.30% 2.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.90% 6.10% 9.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% 3.00% 3.30%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 647 701 883
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 944 648 717
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,572 2,972 3,049
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,946 1,454 1,048

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 17,223 15,934 16,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 91 106 100
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 64 70 77
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 70.00% 66.00% 77.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.12 1.22 1.33

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
6,695
7,245
8,319
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 163 197 187
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 558 577 594
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,130 2,336 2,620
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,970 2,093 2,339
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,417 1,596 1,986
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 457 446 593
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 20.60% 27.10% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 9,316 9,159
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 235,031 237,335
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 179 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 431 504 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $22,923,000 $22,690,000 $22,743,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $65,460,000 $60,875,000 $59,921,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $103,492,000 $99,599,000 $96,127,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $14,235,000 $9,643,000 $11,564,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 22.00% 21.00% 18.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,114 2,069 2,797
Number of people served in facility based work. 7,108 6,824 7,289
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 7,755 7,667 7,959
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 60.00 54.90 52.90

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 61.91% 63.54% 65.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.97% 9.75% 9.56%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.23% 1.40% 1.43%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.75% 98.92% 99.65%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 29.80% 27.51% 27.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.40% 64.94% 64.51%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 72.90% 77.56% 77.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.60% 37.43% 37.36%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,759,088
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 269,729
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,118,183
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,387,912
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 410
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 862
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,272
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,894,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $16,572,273

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 16 9 4
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 2 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 72 74 62
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 4 6 5
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 94 89 71
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 25 19 5
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 24 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 9,156 9,578 6,253
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 451 488 301
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 9,656 10,085 6,559

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

The DVR, DPI, and DHS will continue joint sponsorship of training events focused on improving transition and vocational rehabilitation services. In addition to the agreement–specific training, DVR staffs are encouraged to attend other transition–focused trainings to increase their knowledge of transition issues and processes. The DVR supports attendance of staff at the annual Wisconsin Transition Conference, Employment First, Transition Academy and the annual Rehabilitation and Transition Conference, as a means to increase coordination of services and transition service delivery skills.

The DVR’s Statewide Transition Action and Resource Team (START), consisting of one primary and one alternate representative from each of the 11 VR workforce development service areas, act as local transition experts and technical assistance resource. START members will continue to provide training, technical assistance and consultation to staff in their respective service areas. The team’s goals also include improving individualized engagement of students with disabilities and their parents in the transition/ VR process as well as increasing engagement of schools in transition services. A continued focus for the START team will be to identify specific needs of DVR staff related to the provision of services to transition–aged youth and develop strategies and tools to address those needs. (Page 207-208)

DVR believes that all individuals that apply and seek assistance have the ability and desire to work. DVR commits itself to assisting disabled individuals with achieving dignity through work. Consistent with our mission, and our values, DVR, as expressed in public hearings and stakeholder feedback sessions, agrees that “employment first” reflects DVR’s core set of principles and practices that promote individualized planning and support for employment options for all disabled individuals and that it is the primary goal of our services.

The WRC assists the DVR in the preparation of the State Plan and amendments to the plan, applications, reports, needs assessments and evaluations required by the Rehabilitation Act and subsequent amendments.

The WRC has committees that assume duties assigned to the Council in the Rehabilitation Act. The WRC Evaluation Committee studies VR performance in serving specific groups of disabled individuals and reviews consumer satisfaction survey responses. The WRC Reports Committee develops the WRC Annual Report and assists with the development of the State Plan. The Executive Committee oversees the work of the Council and assures that Council functions and responsibilities are carried out. (Page 218)

Customized Employment

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Pages 186)

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic

Self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 189)

Customized Employment services can be used if an individual has not been successful utilizing typical supported employment services.

Supported Employment services in Wisconsin utilize a consumer centered resource team. This team includes the DVR consumer, DVR staff, the Supported Employment service provider, the special education or other teacher, long–term support case manager, the guardian or anyone else the consumer chooses to invite.

DVR will develop and implement printed materials and provide outreach and technical assistance to schools and families to share supported employment and other resources for employment related services.

DVR has identified some sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children’s waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long–term support. (Page 191)

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 219)

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Page 221)

  • Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long–term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees
  • Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model is expanding and will be available in more than 13 counties. The model is a systems change approach to provide employment using evidence based practice elements in the treatment of serious and persistent mental illness. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. IPS in Wisconsin also incorporates learning collaborative which collects data, sets outcome goals and provides ongoing technical assistance. (Page 225)
  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.
  • DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services (SES) as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee–for–service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community–based SES and LTES in lieu of center–based extended employment. (Page 226)

In FY 2016-2017 there is a plan to emphasize building capacity and improving the quality of the existing provider network. DVR has updated and strengthened the technical specifications for services, which include identification of specific roles, and responsibilities for the consumer, DVR and the service providers. We expect to provide training for providers that will include use of new methodologies for job development and on the job supports, taking some evidence based strategies

From Individual Placement and Support (IPS) and incorporating them into supported employment services. DVR will also be creating a standardized statewide service for customized employment. DVR will continue to explore strategies to identify new providers and to work with the existing provider network to increase capacity.

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 219)

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Page 221)

  • Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long–term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees.
  • Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model is expanding and will be available in more than 13 counties. The model is a systems change approach to provide employment using evidence based practice elements in the treatment of serious and persistent mental illness. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. IPS in Wisconsin also incorporates learning collaborative which collects data, sets outcome goals and provides ongoing technical assistance. (Page 225)
  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.
  • DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services (SES) as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee–for–service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community–based SES and LTES in lieu of center–based extended employment. ( Page 226)

From Individual Placement and Support (IPS) and incorporating them into supported employment services. DVR will also be creating a standardized statewide service for customized employment. DVR will continue to explore strategies to identify new providers and to work with the existing provider network to increase capacity.

DVR also has a goal to continue to expand the (IPS) model of supported employment for individual with serious and persistent mental illness in Wisconsin. This goal has been met. The number of sites has grown from three sites in 2010, to more than 22 in FY 15. It is expected that IPS will continue to grow across Wisconsin. DVR is an active partner in that effort.

(3) The VR program’s performance on the performance accountability indicators under section 12016 of WIOA.

A. Percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program. (Page 242)

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

DVR participated in a research study, which looked at Motivational Interviewing skills and how those skills impact the relationship between consumers and the VR counselor. This study was sponsored by TACE5 and supported by University of Wisconsin Madison and several private consultants. Since FFY 2013 over 188 counselors, 27 DVR supervisors and several Central Office Staff were trained. The results of this research have shown Motivational Interviewing to be very promising and DVR will continue to provide training as both a professional development tool as well as a counselor retention effort.

DVR has partners with the Promise Grant to expand training in "trauma–informed care" and reviewing additional opportunities to add to new and continuing staff training. More training will also be provided to advance "rapid engagement" with consumers to ensure a better and faster attachment to the labor force using techniques such as those demonstrated through IPS. This should also ensure smaller caseloads for counselors. (Page 204)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The one–stop delivery system’s compliance with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act is ensured through Wisconsin’s submittal of its Methods of Administration (MOA) to the US DOL’s Civil Rights Center.

The State of Wisconsin, Department of Workforce Development, Division of Employment and Training was first required to submit a Method of Administration (MOA) under the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) in 1984. These requirements continued in 1993 under the regulations implementing the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of JTPA as set forth in 29 CFR Part §34.33. The MOA requirements have remained substantially the same under 29 CFR Part §37.54(a) which also required the Governor to establish and maintain an MOA for the State. The most recent updated MOA submitted to the DOL Office of Compliance and Policy (OCP), Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management (OASAM) that describe the State of Wisconsin plan to meet the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of Section 188 of WIOA and its implementing regulations at 29 CFR Part §37 was submitted on December 18, 2014. New WIOA regulations that apply to equal opportunity and nondiscrimination recently changed from 29 CFR Part §37 to 29 CFR Part §38. The OCP acknowledged receipt of the MOA on January 23, 2015 which covers us from December 21, 2014 through December 21, 2016. Wisconsin is currently operating under the current MOA; however, we must review the MOA and the manner in which we have implemented our MOA to determine if any changes or updates are required prior to December 21, 2016. Wisconsin DWD–DET will update its MOA prior to December 21, 2016 in accordance to 29 CFR Part §38.54 WIOA funded sub–recipients of DET must comply with the same elements addressed in the State’s MOA. Additionally, contracts/grants funded under WIOA include equal opportunity nondiscrimination assurance language obligating the sub–recipient to comply with DWD–DET’s provision contained in the MOA, (Page 86)

Every WDB is required to ensure compliance with section 188 of WIOA in the Local WIOA Plan. For PY15 DWD took the new step of requiring that local WDBs consult with the local Independent Living Center regarding the local job centers. DWD’s intention in including that requirement was to facilitate more meaningful relationships between the WDBs and these important stakeholders. As the bookend to the program administration year, each WDB is monitored by the WIOA Civil Rights Compliance Officer to ensure that plans are being implemented. Wisconsin’s one–stop center certification policy has not yet been finalized. Additional descriptions will be placed here upon issuance. (Page 87-88)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

As a Round 2 DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed this 3–year, $2,330,000 demonstration project designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource supports improves the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6–month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post–DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin.

During the extension period, DEI focused on: 

  • Ensuring accessibility in all eleven Workforce Development Areas
    • Pilot areas:
      • WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues addressed
    • Control areas:
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered opportunity for American with Disabilities Act (ADA) inspections. Resulted in 8 inspections in 3 WDAs being completed;
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI. Resulted in 9 Job Centers in 4 WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, and specialized keyboards, etc.
    • All WDAs:
      • 49 Job Centers will have identical set up of new CPU, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology equipment.
  • Developing capacity to deliver awareness– and knowledge–building training to workforce staff, employers, and the public:
    • Piloted hybrid training that mixed live WebEx and in–person training. Presentations were recorded and will be available online through the Learning Center for Wisconsin public training and Cornerstone internal training platforms. Topics: Creating a Mentally Healthy Workplace (for employers) and Hmong Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity;
    • Developed a mental health stigma–reduction series of online training specifically for workforce development staff;
    • Developed a series of disability–related online training modules, currently in post–production preparation. Topics: Using the Assistive Technology on the JCW Computers, Disability Etiquette, How Disabilities Can Affect Job Seekers, Developing Cultural Competence, Learning Disabilities, Invisible Disabilities, Effective Communication with Job Seekers, and Employees with Disabilities. (Page 87)

Wisconsin’s participation in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) has well–positioned the state for continued physical and programmatic compliance. As a Round 2 DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed this 3–year, $2,330,000 demonstration project designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource supports improves the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6–month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post–DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin. (Page 117)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

During the extension period, DEI focused on: 

  • Ensuring accessibility in all eleven Workforce Development Areas
    • Pilot areas:
      • WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues addressed
    • Control areas:
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered opportunity for American with Disabilities Act (ADA) inspections. Resulted in 8 inspections in 3 WDAs being completed;
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI. Resulted in 9 Job Centers in 4 WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, and specialized keyboards, etc.
    • All WDAs:
      • 49 Job Centers will have identical set up of new CPU, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology equipment. 
  • Developing capacity to deliver awareness– and knowledge–building training to workforce staff, employers, and the public:
    • Piloted hybrid training that mixed live WebEx and in–person training. Presentations were recorded and will be available online through the Learning Center for Wisconsin public training and Cornerstone internal training platforms.

Topics: Creating a Mentally Healthy Workplace (for employers) and Hmong Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity;

  • Developed a mental health stigma–reduction series of online training specifically for workforce development staff;
  • Developed a series of disability–related online training modules, currently in post–production preparation.

Topics: Using the Assistive Technology on the JCW Computers, Disability Etiquette, How Disabilities Can Affect Job Seekers, Developing Cultural Competence, Learning Disabilities, Invisible Disabilities, Effective Communication with Job Seekers, and Employees with Disabilities. (Page 87)

Wisconsin is particularly interested in properly carrying out the financial literacy element. Under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant, staff training on asset development was created and delivered to WIA staff in the grant’s six pilot regions. The training included community-based asset development resources, relevant to the WDA that identified the resources. Although each local asset development guide focused on resources for job seekers with disabilities, many of the resources are also appropriate for individuals without disabilities.

Wisconsin’s DEI participation provided a solid start, and statewide creation and adoption of the guide is in progress. Web-based staff training will follow. The web-based training will focus on increasing awareness of what financial literacy is the impact of it on individuals at different stages of life, and how to find appropriate federal, state and local community-based services for job seekers. The training will be appropriate for and available to staff in WIOA Youth, Adult, and Dislocated Worker Programs as well as other partners. ( Page 117)

WRC Recommendation 7

We request updates on the PROMISE grant at our quarterly meetings to learn and share best practices on working with youth with disabilities. 

DSU Response:

DVR very much looks forward to sharing with the council the progress of all pilots and projects and steps taken by DVR to improve our services and outcomes. 

WRC Recommendation 8 (Page 172)

Most importantly, DVR has collaborated with the Board for People with Developmental Disabilities, the Department of Health Services, and the Department of Public Instruction on a pilot grant program designed to improve transition services by offering career and work experience while in high school. The “Let’s Get to Work” grant allowed a best practice to be developed between special education, DVR and long–term care providers to offer employment focused transition plans for developmental disabled students. The Promise Grant, where Wisconsin is one of six federal demonstration sites, further expands this collaboration and focus on youth.

DVR has a collaborative project with the Great Lakes Inter–Tribal Council as an Innovation and Expansion option. Three tribal entities are currently working with DVR to "Place and Train" Wisconsin DVR consumers in tribal businesses. (Page 172)

Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WDVR will pilot approaches, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development. (Page 189)

Use of systematic instruction principles will be piloted and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.

Supported Employment funds will be provided to youth with significant disabilities needing supported employment to utilize at least 10% of the budget required by WIOA. The remaining funds will be provided to adults with significant disabilities. It is expected that WDVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI VR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services. The WDVR case management system has the ability to identify cases and expend the funds allotted as required by RSA.

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including Individual Placement and Support (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). (Page 190)

In Wisconsin, extended service funding is available through Managed Care and County funded mental health services. DVR is planning to pilot systematic instruction principles and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.

It is expected that WDVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI VR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services.

DVR has a policy in place for the coordination of IEP’s and IPE’s prior to graduation and prior to that when necessary. In the past, service and treatment plans with long–term care and mental health were coordinated and services identified and funding responsibilities determined. Due to the nature and scope of the changes expected in the long–term care system in Wisconsin, it is difficult to know how this will be accomplished but it is expected that treatment and service plans will continue to include and involve active collaboration with DVR. (Page 192)

DVR partnered with the Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI) to provide training for individuals with disabilities in a retail setting. This national program began its pilot in Milwaukee–area Walgreens retail locations in 2012 and is now a statewide initiative.

Building on the success of the REDI model, also called place and train, DVR offered the place and train model with other businesses and is currently working with businesses throughout Wisconsin to implement this model in their workplaces. 

Additionally, DVR has become the Point of Contact for Kwik Trip in all its Wisconsin convenience stores. DVR also works to meet the talent needs through our National Employment Team with employers such as Meijer, Wells Fargo, and Amazon. (Page 194)

Eligibility Pilot: Beginning in 2015, DVR contracted with the University of Wisconsin–Stout Vocational Rehabilitation Institute (SVRI) for an eligibility review process, authorizing SVRI to collect and make recommendations to appropriate DVR staff for eligibility and OOS determinations. This pilot is anticipated to free up to 15% of the counselor’s time to refocus on direct consumer employment plan activities. This pilot, therefore, anticipates that additional staff will be retained who experience "case burnout" from process activities. The data in Table 1 shows the number of permanent authorized FTEs by personnel category and the current vacancies in each category as of April 2014. However, we anticipate a vacancy rate of 5% during the 5 year projection period, (combination of past and current budget instructions). DVR anticipates maintaining adequate resources both in fiscal and staff resources to ensure a sustainable caseload. In December 2013, Act 58 provided funding for 9 additional VR Counselor positions. Table 1 Row Job Title Total positions Projected vacancies over the next 5 years 1 VR Counselor 196 10 2 Consumer Case Coordinator 69 3 3 Field Managers/Supervisors 25 1 4 Central Office Senior Leadership/ Managers 7 3 5 Central Office Staff Support 25 1 6 Total 322 18

DVR will continue to maintain an average employment plan caseload of 16,500, not to exceed 17,000, during FFY 2016–20. During the 5 year caseload projection period, the counselor caseload ratio should continue to comply with the DVR’s goal of not more than 100 consumers with active IPEs per counselor per month, recognizing that another 20–25% are individuals in applicant or plan development. ( Page 198)

Supported Employment funds will be provided to youth with significant disabilities needing supported employment to utilize at least 10% of the budgetary required by WIOA. The remaining funds will be provided to adults with significant disabilities. It is expected that WI DVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI DVR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services. Use of systematic instruction principles will be piloted and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.  (Page 219)

Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports. ( Page 221)

  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports. (Page 226)

DVR entered into an agreement with the Department of Health Services to pilot a new comprehensive approach for the provision of supported employment to individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness called individual placement and support (IPS). The Wisconsin IPS system change grant partnership with Dartmouth College Community Mental Health Program provides funds for mental health care employment service expansion and technical assistance. As part of the 3–year initiative, DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population.  DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population. (Page 236)

3) Develop and implement a plan to increase available supported employment resources. The DVR plan is to increase coordination with other funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care long term funding and services, and increase the number of supported employment providers in targeted areas of the state. The BPDD pilot “Let’s Get to Work” for transition students also holds great promise as a template for adult braided services and further collaboration with the state’s long–term care program. (Page 239)

The following table and narrative highlights the innovation and expansion activity supported by DVR funds in FFY15. Innovation and expansion activities are generally funded in accordance with DVR’s state fiscal year (i.e., July 1 – June 30) but may be conducted on a federal fiscal year if applicable. Contract / Agreement Start/End DVR funds Fiscal Arrangement and Type 8 local I and E projects with CIL’s 7/1/2010–6/30/13 $15,000 each location annually Each CIL worked with the local WDA Director to develop new patterns of services to be provided to DVR Consumers. Projects include: Assistive Technology work evaluation services, peer assisted job search instruction, financial literacy training and youth job groups. REDI Walgreen’s 4/1/12–6/30/13 $18,600 for site creation. Case service funds for direct consumer services. Intensive retail training with supports and competency based certification for potential hire with corporate partners. Let’s Get to Work 2/1/12–6/30/15 Case Service funds via Youth OJT DVR has committed and created a youth transition OJT to attach youth with disabilities to competitive employment prior to HS completion. Vocational Futures Planning Services 10/1/12 –9/30/15 Case Service funds Collaborative effort with long term care and other providers to provider individualized–based services, including case management services, to people with significant physical disabilities that are in need of long term care. Milwaukee Wrap Around Pilot 6/1/20132013 –9/30/ 2015 $350,500 annually Mentor program to establish resources and services to assist in employment. Innovation and Expansion—Place and Train Models. (Page 244)

DVR partnered with the Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI) to provide training for individuals with disabilities in a retail setting. This national program began its pilot in Milwaukee–area Walgreens retail locations in 2012 and is now a statewide initiative.

Building on the success of the REDI model, also called place and train, DVR offered the place and train model with other businesses and is currently working with businesses throughout Wisconsin to implement this model in their workplaces.

As required under section 101(a)(15)(E)(ii) of the Act, the Wisconsin Rehabilitation Council (WRC) and the DVR annually jointly prepare and submit to the RSA Commissioner a report on the activities and progress of the DVR in meeting its goals and priorities. This report is known as the annual Wisconsin Rehabilitation Council report. (Page 245)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Wisconsin is particularly interested in properly carrying out the financial literacy element. Under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant, staff training on asset development was created and delivered to WIA staff in the grant’s six pilot regions. The training included community-based asset development resources, relevant to the WDA that identified the resources. Although each local asset development guide focused on resources for job seekers with disabilities, many of the resources are also appropriate for individuals without disabilities. (Page 117)

  • information, services, assistance, assessments and job searching
  • computer and technology skill enhancement
  • resume development
  • interview skills
  • GED assistance
  • Educational opportunities
  • Short term training
  • Career assessments and exploration
  • Referrals to organizations for a variety of financial literacy information or services
  • Resource Room assistance
  • Computer access for job searching, writing and printing of resumes, online employment applications and assistance
  • Skill Explorer – the State skill matching system that links skill sets to current employment opportunities locally, regionally and statewide
  • Outreach – which can include meeting clients at itinerant locations, career and job fairs; local libraries
  1. Registering on Job Center of Wisconsin also provides the opportunity to receive e–blasts which provide information on Job Fairs, hiring events
  2. Claimants can utilize Skill Explorer which assists in matching skill sets to current job openings, including location and rates of pay (Page 128)

After the Division is assured that eligible individuals are adequately supported in their employment plan costs, and that Title I–B funds have been used to activate individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities from the OOS wait list in a timely manner, up to 2% of Title I–B case aids funds may be used for other allowable purposes, including innovation and expansion services. The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is currently focusing on programs that expand financial literacy, job development, youth services, and underserved tribal populations. Each program was created to address specific local needs in respective WDAs. Topics include: banking basics, car purchases, budgeting, understanding credit, employment barriers, online applications, social skills, temporary work experiences, self–advocacy, and obtaining gainful employment. Throughout the year, quarterly reports are due to DVR for review of progress and scope. It is anticipated for these services to transition from I&E funding to fee–for–service agreements upon successful effective completion. (Page 229)

Specialized Innovation and Expansion Projects In WDA 1, 5 and 8 there are financial literacy projects that established a program to help consumers better understand fraud, identity theft, savings, budgeting, and financial stability. The cost of the combined project: $40,686.

In WDA’s 5 and 6 there was a Project in partnership with the Division of Employment and Training provides comprehensive, individualized and value added services to DVR consumers. It adds optimizing opportunities to stay competitive in the inclusive marketplace. The cost of the project $148,218 (Page 243)

The following table and narrative highlights the innovation and expansion activity supported by DVR funds in FFY15. Innovation and expansion activities are generally funded in accordance with DVR’s state fiscal year (i.e., July 1 – June 30) but may be conducted on a federal fiscal year if applicable. Contract / Agreement Start/End DVR funds Fiscal Arrangement and Type 8 local I and E projects with CIL’s 7/1/2010–6/30/13 $15,000 each location annually Each CIL worked with the local WDA Director to develop new patterns of services to be provided to DVR Consumers. Projects include: Assistive Technology work evaluation services, peer assisted job search instruction, financial literacy training and youth job groups. REDI Walgreen’s 4/1/12–6/30/13 $18,600 for site creation. Case service funds for direct consumer services. Intensive retail training with supports and competency based certification for potential hire with corporate partners. Let’s Get to Work 2/1/12–6/30/15 Case Service funds via Youth OJT DVR has committed and created a youth transition OJT to attach youth with disabilities to competitive employment prior to HS completion. Vocational Futures Planning Services 10/1/12 –9/30/15 Case Service funds Collaborative effort with long term care and other providers to provider individualized–based services, including case management services, to people with significant physical disabilities that are in need of long term care. Milwaukee Wrap Around Pilot 6/1/20132013 –9/30/ 2015 $350,500 annually Mentor program to establish resources and services to assist in employment. Innovation and Expansion—Place and Train Models. (Page 244)

Benefits

Cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include: 

  • 1,637 Job Center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals external to the Job Centers;
  • 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks;
  • 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period;
  • 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 87)

The One–Stop system will ensure access to services or programs to English language learners (ELLs) by providing program information in alternate languages and formats through use of interpreters, translation, and other methods, as necessary and appropriate. Services to ELLs will be provided at the time and in a manner that avoids the imposition of an undue burden on or delay in receiving important benefits or services. As needed, clients in need of English Language Learning services will be will be connected with partner providers at a technical college or community based literacy organization.(Page 89)

If an entity other than the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation fails to provide or pay for comparable benefits or services for an eligible individual, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation shall provide or pay for such services to the individual.

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation will claim reimbursement for the services from the entity that failed to provide or pay for such services. Such entity shall reimburse the DVR pursuant to the terms of the interagency agreement or other mechanism described in this paragraph according to the procedures established in such agreement or mechanism.

Agency partners involved in the interagency agreements specifying the coordination of service procedures are described in this attachment. A DVR services coordination agreement may involve coordinated use of interagency funds. The service delivery timeframes within the Act and those referenced in the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual shall establish the minimum standard for the timely delivery of vocational rehabilitation services. At its discretion, the Division may create additional requirements for the coordination and timely delivery of services when establishing mechanisms for interagency coordination that affect the delivery of services.( Page 177)

The Wisconsin DOC has awarded a Benefits Specialist Program to Legal Action of Wisconsin (LAW). The project, Disabled Offenders Economic Security (DOES) Project, will work with the 13 DOC institutions identified as having the highest number of inmates with serious mental illness and DD, to ensure that disabled offenders receive their benefits during the re– entry process, including employment and DVR referrals. (Page 178)

DVR employs an outcome based statewide fee structure with technical specifications for commonly used and available services. Statewide rates and technical specifications established for the services most commonly purchased from non–profit vocational rehabilitation service providers include: benefits analysis, internship/temporary work, job coaching, job preparation, development and placement, supported employment, vocational evaluation, and IPS supported employment, assistive technology assessment and services. Agencies wishing to provide these services sign a fee–for–service agreement with DVR. The statewide rates, technical specifications for services, service provider agreement and the providers that have a signed agreement with DVR are posted on the DVR public website. Other service agreements may be developed as required and appropriate. Agencies are must renew annual and sign service provider agreements for each new State Fiscal Year. (Page 187)

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits.(Page 198- 190)

DVR has identified some sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children’s waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long–term support. (Page 191)

  • Long–term support for people who do not qualify for these supports based on IQ – for example, people diagnosed with autism or mental illness.
  • Improved job coaching so that coaching can fade in a reasonable and timely way.
  • Development of a mentor system for work place role models
  • Ability to address basic needs before or during rehabilitation e.g. food shelter, basic medical care.
  • Improved use of appropriate work skills evaluation tools
  • Support of business community for developing a work environment friendly to individuals with disabilities, e.g. need for part time employment, preservation of benefits, flexibility, volunteer work.
  • Support of wrap around services not just on the job, e.g. transportation.
  • Need to change the long term support system to a managed care approach to retain and expand funding for long–term supported employment services
  • Need to orient the long term care system toward a “money follows the person” approach
  • Development of natural supports, in lieu of funded long–term extended services
  • Expansion of peer support specialists for individuals with mental illness.
  • Informational services regarding various options and programs for families.
  • More and better targeted career information to address the attitude that there are no jobs that persons with disabilities can do
  • Increased need for soft skill preparation to expand employment opportunities
  • Increased education for business community re: the business benefits of hiring our consumers
  • Expanded work incentives and increased access to benefits advisement
  • Need for expanded work incentive demonstrations to more fully address the number of consumers experiencing disincentive to full employment (e.g., SSDI $2/$1 benefit offset and “Making Work Pay” cost–share demonstration)
  • DVR Administrator to continue to provide quarterly updates on the wait list numbers to the Council as recommended. (Page 210) 

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits.

Programmatic Goal 5: DVR will meet and exceed the expenditure requirement under WOIA requiring at least 50% of supported employment funds on youth with significant disabilities.  (Page 219)

The DVR continues to utilize technical specifications and fee schedules in the provision of services provided by Community Rehabilitation Programs including: job development, supported employment, job coaching, benefits analysis, and vocational evaluation. In addition, the DVR conducts regular meetings with vendors of these services for feedback, clarification and ongoing compliance and improvement of services.

DVR will continue to provide an OJT affirmative hiring initiative to assist employers with the initial cost of training a hired DVR job seeker. DVR area managers train CRP job–placement staff on the use of the OJT initiative. CRP job placement staff is encouraged to use the OJT initiative when they speak to employers about hiring DVR job seekers. (Page 233)

At the service delivery level, in the State of Wisconsin the TAA program integrates our employment and training program activities in coordination with other workforce entities such as WIOA Dislocated Worker Program, Veterans Program, Technical Colleges; within the established One–Stop Job Center (workforce development) delivery system. TAA staff maintains communication to all partners in the Job Center by attending staff meetings & Rapid Response sessions, and have an active role with key functions within the Job Center. By attending Job Center staff meetings, partners are provided updates on TAA legislation, new petition filings and certifications, and upcoming Trade Intake events happening in their WDA. Local Job Service TAA staff will be present at all Trade Intake sessions. In addition, partner entities (WIOA, Veteran, Technical Colleges, etc.) will be invited to participate in the Intake in order to increase the likelihood of co–enrollment or dual–enrollment, and dates and times are coordinated as meeting arrangements are being made. WIOA will maintain a working knowledge of TAA benefits and services in order to provide these services to co–enrolled participants through WIOA case management. (Page 261)

All newly hired LVER or DVOP staff will complete on–line distance learning regarding veteran’s benefits. This training is provided by NVTI Training Solutions, a DOLVETS sponsored training provider. All FTE staff will be required to attend Facilitating Veteran Employment training offered by NVTI. In addition, LVER will receive training on employer outreach. DVOPs will receive training on Facilitating Veteran Employment and Intensive Services. All LVER or DVOP training will be provided within 18 months of hire. Staff will receive instructions on all data entry from DWD/OVS supervisor. Specific Webinar necessary training will be provided to LVER and DVOP staff by DWD. All DWD/OVS will receive additional training requested by staff or DWD management through Cornerstone. (Page 275)

School to Work Transition

DVR staff attends Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings, with consent from the student and family. DVR is also available to provide information and technical assistance on transition services to teachers, parents, and other organizations and councils.

As outlined in the TAG and the DVR Policy the development of the plan for employment for students who are eligible for plan development, is to occur prior to the student leaving school. DVR staff and educators are encouraged to coordinate the provision of services and transition activities for students who are eligible for both IEP and an IPE services to assist them in transitioning from school to work.

The DVR Statewide Transition Action and Resource Team (START), supported by the interagency agreement, have the role to improve consistency and engagement in the transition process. The DVR START team and the DPI Wisconsin Transition Improvement Grant (TIG) also collaborate to improve consistency in the provision of service to youth with disabilities as they transition from school to post high school activities that include VR services. TIG provides technical assistance to school districts, Cooperative Educational School Districts (CESA) and county Transition Advisory Councils, including, information dissemination and participation in staff development activities. The Interagency Agreement also supports TIG. DVR START and TIG also collaborate to provide training regarding the Interagency Agreement. (Page 185)

  • DVR conducts regular collaborative meetings and activity with sources of long term support including managed care organizations, self–directed managed care and county programs to facilitate referrals, service coordination and increase outcomes.
  • DVR is a strong partner in the Board for People with Developmental Disabilities and their “Let’s Get to Work” pilot to strengthen career and job attachments for high school transition students. Outcome goals include:
    • Changes in policy that increase community employment for youth with I/DD
    • Increases in integrated, community employment rates of youth with I/DD o Changes in stakeholder attitudes about the employability of youth with I/DD
  • The federally funded PROMISE grant and Let’s Get to Work are comprised of 4 main areas: 
  1. Consortium of 70 key stakeholders who identify policy issues and includes a youth track,
  2. A policy team that takes the work of the Consortium and strategizes way to implement policy changes,
  3. 9 school pilot sites implementing evidence based practices and identifying barriers to employment, and
  4. Coaches who provide intense, on–site technical assistance to the school sites. (Page 226)
Data Collection

No specific disability related information found.

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Business services professionals representing various programs and services serve on a local Business services Team, and use a shared business relationship (account) management system in order to effectively communicative activities with businesses in real-time. DVR is represented on local business service teams primarily through its business service consultants. Business Services professionals participate in collaborative training with other partners.

DVR participated in planning and attending the annual Collaborate conference which brings business services professionals and business together to discuss needs, opportunities, successes and best practices.

Additionally, state agencies began convening in PY15 at the direction of Governor Walker to create a one-stop portal for businesses to ensure that all employers, including small businesses, can learn about available services and programs. While this project is in early stages, it has the potential to be invaluable to helping businesses find talent. (Page 52)

Career Pathways

Guidance and support will be provided statewide at the agency level by the Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee. Financial resources will be provided, in part, through the TAACCCT Exceeding the Cap project, funded by DOL and called Advancing Careers of TAA and Transitions or ACT2. The Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee includes representation from the WTCS, DWD, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI), the Wisconsin Workforce Development Association (WWDA), and the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC). The active participation of the partners of the Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee ensures that career pathways in Wisconsin are industry-driven and support students and job seekers of all ages, backgrounds, and abilities. (Page 33)

WIOA requirements of service provider report cards will be made possible through data sharing. Partners will gather and analyze data, synthesize it into reports, share findings with other partners, and facilitate discussions for improvements. Once data sharing capabilities are established, partners will make the report cards easily accessible to job seekers, WIOA core partners, and the public. Each partner will ensure that its own staff is kept trained on how to access and use the report cards. All core partners’ services, including Career Pathways and ABE/High School Equivalency Diploma, will be part of the service provider report card offerings. (Page 35)

The State is a recognized national leader in career pathways beginning in Basic Skills, moving through post-secondary coursework (concurrently in early courses) and resulting in post-secondary credential attainment. Over 52% of students who enter the system through ABE/ELL enroll in post-secondary coursework in the same or following academic year.

Career Pathways offer an efficient and customer-centered approach to training and education by successfully articulating the appropriate secondary, ABE, postsecondary education and training, career and academic advising and supportive services to enter and progress in a career.

Career Pathway; a series of connected education and training strategies and support services that enable individuals to secure industry relevant certification and obtain employment within an occupational area and to advance to higher levels of future education and employment in that area.

Registered Apprenticeship Access to Postsecondary Credentials is improved with the increased collaboration through the WTCS and Career Pathways…etc.

In addition, this access is strengthened with the increased partnership with apprenticeship in several areas.  (Page 55)

  • Research-based activities such as the STAR reading program (Wisconsin has trained 186 ABE teachers in the STAR approach, and this group has an active web-based learning community)
  • Adult Numeracy Initiative training
  • Preparing to Achieve training
  • Contextualizing the GED training (WTCS-developed)
  • Extensive Career Pathway and Career Pathway Bridge training for both ABE and ELL (The WTCS has hundreds of career pathways identified, and many of these have integrated ABE/occupational Career Pathway Bridges attached)
  • Training in connecting as many partners as possible into our career pathways approach (through Wisconsin’s Moving Pathways Forward initiative).
  • Training in the use of the CCRS-aligned WTCS ABE curriculum standards (required of all grantees) (Page 161)
Employment Networks

Cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include: 

  • 1,637 Job Center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals external to the Job Centers;
  • 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks;
  • 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period;
  • 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 87)
  • DVR will continue to promote the “Partnership Plus” opportunities in the Ticket to Work (TTW) program. DVR will share information with eligible Ticket holders on post–VR services and supports available through assignment of their Ticket to an approved employment network provider.  (Page 227)

Policies and Initiatives

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Wisconsin Employment First Grant Recipients - 09/22/2017

“The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities awarded Employment First Partner grants to 14 community organizations, including: schools, employment providers, managed care organizations, and advocacy organizations.  These organizations will work in their local communities to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Activities will include:  legislative breakfasts, Take Your Legislator to Work visits, business recognition events; leadership mentoring, media campaigns, public service announcements, commercials, community conversations, presentations to local civic groups (e.g., chambers, Rotary clubs) and employer groups, business tours, and business to business mentoring.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 08/01/2017

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

WI Project SEARCH - 07/01/2017

“Project SEARCH is a business led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration. A 9-12 month program, Project SEARCH provides total immersion in a large community business. Students with disabilities are offered a workforce alternative for their last year of high school. All participants must be eligible for services with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). At some sites, young adults who have completed high school may be eligible to participate in Project SEARCH.

The Project SEARCH partnership includes a local high status business, a school, DVR, a vocational services agency and a disability services agency, such as a managed care organization. The business provides an on-site training classroom, business liaison and rotational internships for on the job training. The school provides an instructor. DVR works with a local vocational services agency to supply job coaches who support students in their internships as needed and assist with final job placement. The disability services agency provides follow along services for any eligible student who is hired at the business site or in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 04/05/2017

“This year’s conference title is Embracing Change: Together We Make It Happen. The conference focuses on the changes happening at the state and federal level and how these changes will significantly increase integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. …

Change provides both opportunities and challenges. This conference brings together individuals with disabilities, family members, state vocational rehabilitation counselors, employment providers, policy makers, and educators to learn and share creative ways to address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Department of Health Services Guiding Principles for Competitive Integrated Employment for People with Disabilities in Long-term Care - 04/01/2017

“The Department of Health Services (DHS) has established a list of Guiding Principles that build on the value of full inclusion of people with disabilities served in our long-term care programs. These principles are evidence-based practices that align with our vision for the future for people with disabilities in our communities. We recognize that each person’s path toward competitive integrated employment involves a person-centered planning process that includes a variety of experiences to build toward successful jobs.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 02/17/2017

“Supported employment services are provided in a working alliance with many partners. Communication is the key to success between these partners. Use of issued agency guidance, technical assistance guides, and policies and regulations is encouraged to build collaboration.

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 10/01/2016

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 02/15/2016

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR in 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Supported Employment Fees/Customized Employment - 10/01/2015

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development chart of supported employment and customized employment fees.   It details the Supported Employment Service, and the fee for each service.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WI Statutes: Vocational Rehabilitation; Specialized Programs for Persons with Disabilities - 08/26/2015

This WI statute defines persons with disabilities and explains Vocational Rehabilitation and “special programs for persons with disabilities.” It states that the State will, “Make vocational rehabilitation services under this chapter available in every county to all persons with disabilities who are present in the state, regardless of residency,” and details the services that will be available to people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Wisconsin SB 21 (Act 55) - 07/12/2015

"Senate Bill 21 as 2015 Wisconsin Act 55 is approved and deposited in the office of the Secretary of State...The following is a brief summary of how this budget, including my vetoes, will continue to make Wisconsin more prosperous, more independent and more efficient...Newly establishes Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) accounts to empower the disabled community and their families to achieve greater independence and assist with various expenses."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Wisconsin Fair Employment Act

Wisconsin's Fair Employment Law gives civil rights protections to qualified persons with disabilities. The law applies to virtually all, private and public employers, regardless of the number of employees. Under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), disability discrimination is also prohibited for employers having 15 or more employees. Both laws are designed to ensure equal opportunity in all aspects of employment.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 08/01/2017

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Department of Health Services Guiding Principles for Competitive Integrated Employment for People with Disabilities in Long-term Care - 04/01/2017

“The Department of Health Services (DHS) has established a list of Guiding Principles that build on the value of full inclusion of people with disabilities served in our long-term care programs. These principles are evidence-based practices that align with our vision for the future for people with disabilities in our communities. We recognize that each person’s path toward competitive integrated employment involves a person-centered planning process that includes a variety of experiences to build toward successful jobs.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 02/17/2017

“Supported employment services are provided in a working alliance with many partners. Communication is the key to success between these partners. Use of issued agency guidance, technical assistance guides, and policies and regulations is encouraged to build collaboration.

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 10/01/2016

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 02/15/2016

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR in 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Supported Employment Fees/Customized Employment - 10/01/2015

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development chart of supported employment and customized employment fees.   It details the Supported Employment Service, and the fee for each service.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Transition Action Guide For Post-secondary Planning - 03/01/2015

This Transition Action Guide (TAG) was developed to support the 2007 Interagency Agreement among the Department of Workforce Development (DWD), the Department of Public Instruction (DPI), and the Department of Health Services (DHS). This guide suggests best practices and resources to assist key stakeholders (students, parents/guardians, teachers and school team members, DVR counselors, Children and Adult Long –Term Care and Mental Health professionals, and ADRC representatives) involved in the transition process. This tool can be used as a framework to improve communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

A Better Bottom Line: Governor Scott Walker Delivers Remarks at Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 04/03/2014

“Governor Walker proclaimed 2014 as the Year of A Better Bottom Line to encourage and promote employment opportunities for people with disabilities... During the Year of A Better Bottom Line, Governor Walker is directing state agencies to focus on recognizing and promoting public and private programs, companies, and organizations that are improving employment opportunities for people with disabilities, including veterans and students.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Priorities for People with Disabilities in Wisconsin

“This packet provides information and recommendations on various issues that people with disabilities face, including integrated employment, access to health care and schools, and special education funding.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Wisconsin Individual Placement and Support

IPS is an evidenced based practice model of supported employment for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. In Wisconsin the Department of Workforce Development, DVR has partnered with the Department of Health Services - Division of Mental Health to establish IPS in Wisconsin as part of a grant from Dartmouth College and Johnson and Johnson. Mental health services in Wisconsin are provided by each county. The IPS model involves a team approach involving an Employment Specialist and a DVR counselor becoming a part of a mental health treatment team, with employment becoming a focus of mental health services. Adherence to the prescribed national model is essential. Fidelity reviews are conducted until good fidelity is achieved. Technical assistance is provided as part of the grant and can be provided for counties wishing to implement IPS. Legislation has been proposed (2014) for a significant expansion of IPS availability in Wisconsin.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation: “Employment First Team” - 03/01/2015

Lists team members and headquarters as of March 2015.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Transition Interagency Agreement - 12/02/2010

This interagency agreement has been revised from the July 2007 interagency agreement to now focus on both students with disabilities transitioning from high school as well as adults with disabilities, who have an expectation for integrated competitive employment. It has also been elaborated for clarity and to reflect best practices associated with increasing employment opportunities for people with cognitive and/or physical disabilities who also have challenges with mental health. Based on recommendations made by a statewide employment task force, this agreement represents the intent to fully coordinate all of the activities and programs within each agency, for every internal and external stakeholder who is striving to achieve employment for citizens with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Interagency Agreement MOU: Adults and Transitioning Youth - 12/02/2010

“This agreement between DPI, DVR, and DHS has four overall priorities supporting integrated employment: To comply with federal legal mandates under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA). To provide practical guidance, technical assistance, and training to internal and external stakeholders and staff regarding employment-related services and supports. To provide information on employment services to individuals with disabilities and their family members or guardians so they will be able to participate fully in employment. To provide clarification of roles of stakeholders within each respective department regarding individuals with disabilities who have identified support needs associated with employment and independent living, so that individuals and their families may regard such efforts to be as seamless, non-duplicative, and as transparent as possible.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for the Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program - 11/10/2009

“The purpose of this MOU is for the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) and the Department of Children and Families, Division of Family and Economic Security, Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program to establish collaborative efforts regarding their services and to develop a common understanding regarding their roles, policies, and procedures to better serve individuals with disabilities who may benefit from services from both programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Department of Health Services’ Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF): Final Report - 07/18/2008

“Against this backdrop, the Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF) was convened in May 2007 by Division of Long-Term Care Administrator Sinikka Santala and charged with recommending a comprehensive strategy to expand work options for adults who rely on the community-based, long-term care system. The Task Force, composed of 28 members representing a wide range of interests and expertise, analyzed the challenges and identified best practices from Wisconsin and elsewhere for overcoming these challenges.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Committee for people with disability Work plan

The Governor’s Committee for People with Disabilities: • Advises the Governor and state agencies on problems faced by people with disabilities, • Reviews legislation and advises the Governor about legislation affecting people with disabilities, • Suggests to the Governor and state agencies ways to enhance the effective operations of publicity and privately administered or supported programs serving people with disabilities, • Promotes the goal of self-sufficiency for people with disabilities, • Promotes the collection, dissemination and incorporation of adequate information about persons with disabilities into public planning at all levels of government, • Promotes public awareness of needs and abilities of people with disabilities, and • Encourages the effective involvement of people with disabilities in government.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other

Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities

“Transition is helping students with disabilities and their families think about their life after high school and identify long-range goals designing the high school experience to ensure that students gain the skills and connections they need to achieve these goals the provision of funds and services to local school districts to assist in the transition process.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Survival Coalition of Wisconsin Disability Organizations

“The intention of the Wisconsin Employment First Coalition is to partner with people with disabilities, other stakeholders, businesses and the public to increase awareness of the need to provide integrated employment opportunities here in Wisconsin. Survival Coalition supports integrated employment as the presumed outcome for people with disabilities. They believe that everyone can and should work in integrated jobs.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

Wisconsin has an APSE chapter.  “WI APSE believes that a state-wide Employment First effort is a vital component to the goal of increasing employment outcomes for citizens with disabilities in a manner that promotes equality of opportunity…Between May and September 2009, WI APSE facilitated group discussions about employment opportunities in eight locations around the state.” This document is a compilation of their observations, suggestions and next steps to implementing Employment First in Wisconsin.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Employment First Community Action Team’s (CATs)

The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities and National APSE  teamed up to fund the technical assistance and training of three to five pilot “Employment First” Community Action Teams (CATs) sites round the state. “The purpose of the CATs is to implement practices around the state aligned with the Employment First Initiative to support an increased number of people with disabilities in Wisconsin to work in their communities. CATs will take the lead in implementing action plan items at a local level, setting local benchmarks, and reporting on progress.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Wisconsin Employment First Grant Recipients - 09/22/2017

“The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities awarded Employment First Partner grants to 14 community organizations, including: schools, employment providers, managed care organizations, and advocacy organizations.  These organizations will work in their local communities to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Activities will include:  legislative breakfasts, Take Your Legislator to Work visits, business recognition events; leadership mentoring, media campaigns, public service announcements, commercials, community conversations, presentations to local civic groups (e.g., chambers, Rotary clubs) and employer groups, business tours, and business to business mentoring.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

WI Project SEARCH - 07/01/2017

“Project SEARCH is a business led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration. A 9-12 month program, Project SEARCH provides total immersion in a large community business. Students with disabilities are offered a workforce alternative for their last year of high school. All participants must be eligible for services with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). At some sites, young adults who have completed high school may be eligible to participate in Project SEARCH.

The Project SEARCH partnership includes a local high status business, a school, DVR, a vocational services agency and a disability services agency, such as a managed care organization. The business provides an on-site training classroom, business liaison and rotational internships for on the job training. The school provides an instructor. DVR works with a local vocational services agency to supply job coaches who support students in their internships as needed and assist with final job placement. The disability services agency provides follow along services for any eligible student who is hired at the business site or in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2011

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project." Wisconsin received a grant to support their Rural Supported Employment and Peer Support Programs.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

MIG-RATS

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Wisconsin PROMISE Initiative

The PROMISE initiative is intended to improve services for youth SSI (Social Security Supplemental Security Income) recipients and their families. The services help youth recipients achieve better outcomes, including graduating from high school ready for college and a career, completing postsecondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. As a result, these youth SSI recipients can achieve long-term reductions in reliance on SSI.   PROMISE is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Social Security Administration, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. Department of Labor.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Disability Employment Initiative

"The WI Disability Employment Initiative was designed to ‘improve the accessibility and accountability of the public workforce development system for individuals with disabilities,’ extending ‘promising practices implemented by disability program navigators.’ Wisconsin’s Disability Employment Initiative will ‘improve coordination and collaboration among employment and training and asset development programs carried out at a state and local level.’ Linking to the ‘Ticket to Work program,’ Wisconsin seeks to build what members of Congress termed ‘effective community partnerships that leverage public and private resources to better serve individuals with disabilities and improve employment outcomes.’”  The grant ended in 2014.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WI Disability Program Navigator

“ETA and SSA are jointly funding the DPN Initiative in 42 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the United States Virgin Islands where SSA implemented employment support initiatives. This Initiative promotes comprehensive services and work incentive information for SSA beneficiaries and other people with disabilities, through the One Stop system. The Initiative focuses on developing new and ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive, and integrated access to services, creating systemic change, and expanding the workforce development system's capacity to serve customers with disabilities and employers.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Partnerships in Employment Systems Change Grant (Let’s Get to Work)

“The Wisconsin Let’s Get to Work project is a five-year, national systems change grant that will lead to improved community employment outcomes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities in transition…Funded by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities the project focuses on improving, developing and implementing policies and practices that raise community expectations and overall employment outcomes for youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 04/05/2017

“This year’s conference title is Embracing Change: Together We Make It Happen. The conference focuses on the changes happening at the state and federal level and how these changes will significantly increase integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. …

Change provides both opportunities and challenges. This conference brings together individuals with disabilities, family members, state vocational rehabilitation counselors, employment providers, policy makers, and educators to learn and share creative ways to address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • WIOA

Family Care Integrated Employment Planning for Members with Physical Disabilities - 07/15/2015

This is a training designed to help Interdisciplinary Team (IDT) understand Family Care Integrated Employment Planning. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Action Guide For Post-secondary Planning - 03/01/2015

This Transition Action Guide (TAG) was developed to support the 2007 Interagency Agreement among the Department of Workforce Development (DWD), the Department of Public Instruction (DPI), and the Department of Health Services (DHS). This guide suggests best practices and resources to assist key stakeholders (students, parents/guardians, teachers and school team members, DVR counselors, Children and Adult Long –Term Care and Mental Health professionals, and ADRC representatives) involved in the transition process. This tool can be used as a framework to improve communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to employment.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 07/01/2014

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence. All DVR services must be provided in competitive wage and integrated settings.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

WI Self-Employment Toolkit V2.0 - 12/19/2013

“This toolkit was developed to assist DVR staff and consumers through the self-employment process. It addresses all areas of the process, from how to start the initial conversation with the consumer, through opening the business and closing the case successfully. The process outlined in this toolkit is in a 12-step format. Each step has a purpose and should be completed prior to moving on to the next step. It is expected that this process will be followed for all start-up self-employment cases.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation: Customized Self-Employment Toolkit - 08/01/2012

“This tool has been developed to assist DVR Staff throughout the exploration and development of a small business for consumers who need a customized or supported approach to self-employment. A consumer requiring a customized approach may need supports to develop and/or maintain the business. Supports could include: long term job coaching supports, ongoing case management, peer supports, natural supports, family supports or ongoing paid professional services for the business, etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Self-Directed Employment Planning Resource Guide - 07/01/2012

“This Resource Guide was designed to be used with the Self-Directed Employment Planning online modules. Since the Self-Directed Employment Planning modules are an on-line resource, website links are included as part of the Resource Guide. If you click on the website links in an electronic version of this guide from a computer, you should be able to go to each website.    This Resource Guide is set up in the same order as the training modules. There are ten sections that go with each of the ten on-line modules. You should listen to each module first and then take the time to look at the information in this Resource Guide that goes with each module.     This Resource Guide also contains helpful templates and samples that were described in the learning modules. You can use these templates in your planning. You can use parts or all of them. You can print off the pages you need and make as many copies of them as you want to use.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Department Workforce Development (DWD) and Department of Health Services (DHS) Technical Assistance Guide for Adults Seeking Integrated Employment - 12/28/2010

“This Adult Technical Assistance Guide (Adult TAG) is intended to improve communication, coordination, and services for adults with disabilities seeking integrated employment who participate in either the Family Care, Family Care Partnership, PACE or IRIS long term care programs and who are jointly eligible for Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) services. It is designed to be useful for all persons and agencies involved in the process of vocational placement and providing long term support for integrated employment.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Beach Center on Disability Research Highlights: Customized Employment - 07/15/2008

“In this study, personal and employment histories of 50 individuals with significant disabilities were examined in table format to identify trends in employment and support the validity of integrated work experiences. Personal histories included: exit year of high school, age disability label and residential support. Employment histories included work environment, time at job, work tasks, hours per week, hourly wage, professional support and reasons for changing jobs. The participants’ experiences began 15-24 years ago when they entered the services provided by Community Work Services Inc. in Madison, Wisconsin.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Self-Directed Employment Planning Modules

“This on-line series was designed to help people with disabilities think about their integrated employment options, understand employment supports, and create a plan to achieve their integrated employment goals.   There are 12 learning modules, which you can watch by clicking the links below.  Start with the introduction so that you can learn how to use this learning series.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

WI Medicaid Purchase Plan

“The Medicaid Purchase Plan offers people with disabilities who are working or interested in working the opportunity to buy health care coverage through the Wisconsin Medicaid Program. Depending on an individual’s income, a premium payment may be required for this health care coverage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Money Follows the Person

“Wisconsin received a federal award for a five-year Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (MFP Demo).  The demonstration, authorized by Congress and funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, provides enhanced federal matching funds for services provided to participants in the demonstration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health

Wisconsin Statewide Transition Plan (Medicaid)

The Department of Health Services (DHS) intends to transition the Community Recovery Services (CRS) program currently operating under the 1915(i) authority to a 1905(a) State Plan authority effective January 1, 2015, pending CMS approval. The DHS has issued a public notice regarding this transition under the Wisconsin State Register published November 15, 2014. If CMS does not approve the transition of the CRS program from a 1915(i) to a 1905(a) State Plan service, then DHS agrees to follow the statewide transition plan for Medicaid HCBS as outlined in this plan.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Wisconsin Medicaid State Plan

“The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of Wisconsin's Medicaid program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Self Directed Support Waiver (IRIS)

“The IRIS Program is a Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver for self-directed long-term supports. The program is an option for adults with long term care needs. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Division of Long Term Care (DLTC), Office of IRIS Management under the authorization of the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) is responsible for oversight of the IRIS program. IRIS is available to Wisconsin residents determined financially eligible for Medicaid, functionally in need of nursing home or Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) level of care; and living in a county where managed long-term care and IRIS are available. People who are eligible have the choice of IRIS or managed care through their local Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Family Care Program

"Family Care was designed to provide cost-effective, comprehensive and flexible long-term care that will foster consumers’ independence and quality of life, while recognizing the need for interdependence and support…”

Family Care, authorized by the Governor and Legislature in 1998, serves people with physical disabilities, people with intellectual/developmental disabilities and frail elders, with the specific goals of: Giving people better choices about where they live and what kinds of services and supports they get to meet their needs; Improving access to services; Improving quality through a focus on health and social outcomes; [and] Creating a cost-effective system for the future.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WI Community Integration Program

“The Community Integration Program is a Medicaid Home and Community-Based Waiver for adults with developmental disabilities.”

“The CIP Waiver helps people with developmental disabilities to stay out of institutions, or to relocate from state centers and nursing homes back to their communities.  In many circumstances, CIP can help prevent someone from having to leave his/her community.  CIP is funded through the federal Medicaid Program (MA).  It is known as an "MA waiver" because the federal government has waived certain regulations, allowing Wisconsin to use the dollars to follow people to the community.  The money goes from the state to county waiver agencies who administer the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The motto of Wisconsin is "Forward," and it's clear to see that things are moving forward on Employment First initiatives that are empowering individuals with disabilities to find success in the careers they choose.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Wisconsin’sVR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.24%
Change from
2014 to 2015
5,771,337
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.35%
Change from
2014 to 2015
351,787
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.99%
Change from
2014 to 2015
144,815
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.35%
Change from
2014 to 2015
41.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.37%
Change from
2014 to 2015
82.28%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 5,771,337
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 351,787
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 144,815
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,619,935
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.28%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 333,922
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 347,167
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 585,992
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 52,516
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 34,937
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,262
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 10,660
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 14,097
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 8,375

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 10,982
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 161,864

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 3,683
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 5,178
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 15,603
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.30%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 9.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 3.30%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 883
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 717
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,049
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,048

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 16,021
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 100
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 77
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 77.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.33

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
8,319
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 187
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 594
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,620
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,339
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,986
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 593
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 9,159
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 237,335
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $22,743,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $59,921,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $96,127,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $11,564,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 18.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,797
Number of people served in facility based work. 7,289
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 7,959
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 52.90

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 65.10%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.56%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.43%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.65%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 27.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.51%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 77.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 37.36%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,759,088
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,964
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 269,729
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,118,183
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,387,912
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 410
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 862
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,272
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,894,656
AbilityOne wages (services). $16,572,273

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 4
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 62
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 5
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 71
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 5
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6,253
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 301
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6,559

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

The DVR, DPI, and DHS will continue joint sponsorship of training events focused on improving transition and vocational rehabilitation services. In addition to the agreement–specific training, DVR staffs are encouraged to attend other transition–focused trainings to increase their knowledge of transition issues and processes. The DVR supports attendance of staff at the annual Wisconsin Transition Conference, Employment First, Transition Academy and the annual Rehabilitation and Transition Conference, as a means to increase coordination of services and transition service delivery skills.

The DVR’s Statewide Transition Action and Resource Team (START), consisting of one primary and one alternate representative from each of the 11 VR workforce development service areas, act as local transition experts and technical assistance resource. START members will continue to provide training, technical assistance and consultation to staff in their respective service areas. The team’s goals also include improving individualized engagement of students with disabilities and their parents in the transition/ VR process as well as increasing engagement of schools in transition services. A continued focus for the START team will be to identify specific needs of DVR staff related to the provision of services to transition–aged youth and develop strategies and tools to address those needs. (Page 207-208)

DVR believes that all individuals that apply and seek assistance have the ability and desire to work. DVR commits itself to assisting disabled individuals with achieving dignity through work. Consistent with our mission, and our values, DVR, as expressed in public hearings and stakeholder feedback sessions, agrees that “employment first” reflects DVR’s core set of principles and practices that promote individualized planning and support for employment options for all disabled individuals and that it is the primary goal of our services.

The WRC assists the DVR in the preparation of the State Plan and amendments to the plan, applications, reports, needs assessments and evaluations required by the Rehabilitation Act and subsequent amendments.

The WRC has committees that assume duties assigned to the Council in the Rehabilitation Act. The WRC Evaluation Committee studies VR performance in serving specific groups of disabled individuals and reviews consumer satisfaction survey responses. The WRC Reports Committee develops the WRC Annual Report and assists with the development of the State Plan. The Executive Committee oversees the work of the Council and assures that Council functions and responsibilities are carried out. (Page 218)

Customized Employment

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Pages 186)

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic

Self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 189)

Customized Employment services can be used if an individual has not been successful utilizing typical supported employment services.

Supported Employment services in Wisconsin utilize a consumer centered resource team. This team includes the DVR consumer, DVR staff, the Supported Employment service provider, the special education or other teacher, long–term support case manager, the guardian or anyone else the consumer chooses to invite.

DVR will develop and implement printed materials and provide outreach and technical assistance to schools and families to share supported employment and other resources for employment related services.

DVR has identified some sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children’s waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long–term support. (Page 191)

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 219)

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Page 221)

  • Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long–term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees
  • Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model is expanding and will be available in more than 13 counties. The model is a systems change approach to provide employment using evidence based practice elements in the treatment of serious and persistent mental illness. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. IPS in Wisconsin also incorporates learning collaborative which collects data, sets outcome goals and provides ongoing technical assistance. (Page 225)
  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.
  • DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services (SES) as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee–for–service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community–based SES and LTES in lieu of center–based extended employment. (Page 226)

In FY 2016-2017 there is a plan to emphasize building capacity and improving the quality of the existing provider network. DVR has updated and strengthened the technical specifications for services, which include identification of specific roles, and responsibilities for the consumer, DVR and the service providers. We expect to provide training for providers that will include use of new methodologies for job development and on the job supports, taking some evidence based strategies

From Individual Placement and Support (IPS) and incorporating them into supported employment services. DVR will also be creating a standardized statewide service for customized employment. DVR will continue to explore strategies to identify new providers and to work with the existing provider network to increase capacity.

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits. (Page 219)

Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services. (Page 221)

  • Customized Employment is available for individuals who are considering supported employment with a recognized need for long–term support. The use of this model requires the service provider attain a certificate of customized employment training completion before services are authorized for purchase and the consumer meet customized employment criteria. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees.
  • Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model is expanding and will be available in more than 13 counties. The model is a systems change approach to provide employment using evidence based practice elements in the treatment of serious and persistent mental illness. DVR has developed service descriptions and associated fees. IPS in Wisconsin also incorporates learning collaborative which collects data, sets outcome goals and provides ongoing technical assistance. (Page 225)
  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.
  • DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services (SES) as well as Long Term Employment Supports (LTES), and financial coordination of these services among funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care services (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). Interagency activities will aim to increase the number or supported employment fee–for–service providers in targeted areas of the State who provide customized employment services and integrated community–based SES and LTES in lieu of center–based extended employment. ( Page 226)

From Individual Placement and Support (IPS) and incorporating them into supported employment services. DVR will also be creating a standardized statewide service for customized employment. DVR will continue to explore strategies to identify new providers and to work with the existing provider network to increase capacity.

DVR also has a goal to continue to expand the (IPS) model of supported employment for individual with serious and persistent mental illness in Wisconsin. This goal has been met. The number of sites has grown from three sites in 2010, to more than 22 in FY 15. It is expected that IPS will continue to grow across Wisconsin. DVR is an active partner in that effort.

(3) The VR program’s performance on the performance accountability indicators under section 12016 of WIOA.

A. Percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program. (Page 242)

Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

DVR participated in a research study, which looked at Motivational Interviewing skills and how those skills impact the relationship between consumers and the VR counselor. This study was sponsored by TACE5 and supported by University of Wisconsin Madison and several private consultants. Since FFY 2013 over 188 counselors, 27 DVR supervisors and several Central Office Staff were trained. The results of this research have shown Motivational Interviewing to be very promising and DVR will continue to provide training as both a professional development tool as well as a counselor retention effort.

DVR has partners with the Promise Grant to expand training in "trauma–informed care" and reviewing additional opportunities to add to new and continuing staff training. More training will also be provided to advance "rapid engagement" with consumers to ensure a better and faster attachment to the labor force using techniques such as those demonstrated through IPS. This should also ensure smaller caseloads for counselors. (Page 204)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

The one–stop delivery system’s compliance with section 188 of WIOA and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act is ensured through Wisconsin’s submittal of its Methods of Administration (MOA) to the US DOL’s Civil Rights Center.

The State of Wisconsin, Department of Workforce Development, Division of Employment and Training was first required to submit a Method of Administration (MOA) under the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) in 1984. These requirements continued in 1993 under the regulations implementing the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of JTPA as set forth in 29 CFR Part §34.33. The MOA requirements have remained substantially the same under 29 CFR Part §37.54(a) which also required the Governor to establish and maintain an MOA for the State. The most recent updated MOA submitted to the DOL Office of Compliance and Policy (OCP), Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management (OASAM) that describe the State of Wisconsin plan to meet the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of Section 188 of WIOA and its implementing regulations at 29 CFR Part §37 was submitted on December 18, 2014. New WIOA regulations that apply to equal opportunity and nondiscrimination recently changed from 29 CFR Part §37 to 29 CFR Part §38. The OCP acknowledged receipt of the MOA on January 23, 2015 which covers us from December 21, 2014 through December 21, 2016. Wisconsin is currently operating under the current MOA; however, we must review the MOA and the manner in which we have implemented our MOA to determine if any changes or updates are required prior to December 21, 2016. Wisconsin DWD–DET will update its MOA prior to December 21, 2016 in accordance to 29 CFR Part §38.54 WIOA funded sub–recipients of DET must comply with the same elements addressed in the State’s MOA. Additionally, contracts/grants funded under WIOA include equal opportunity nondiscrimination assurance language obligating the sub–recipient to comply with DWD–DET’s provision contained in the MOA, (Page 86)

Every WDB is required to ensure compliance with section 188 of WIOA in the Local WIOA Plan. For PY15 DWD took the new step of requiring that local WDBs consult with the local Independent Living Center regarding the local job centers. DWD’s intention in including that requirement was to facilitate more meaningful relationships between the WDBs and these important stakeholders. As the bookend to the program administration year, each WDB is monitored by the WIOA Civil Rights Compliance Officer to ensure that plans are being implemented. Wisconsin’s one–stop center certification policy has not yet been finalized. Additional descriptions will be placed here upon issuance. (Page 87-88)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

As a Round 2 DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed this 3–year, $2,330,000 demonstration project designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource supports improves the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6–month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post–DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin.

During the extension period, DEI focused on: 

  • Ensuring accessibility in all eleven Workforce Development Areas
    • Pilot areas:
      • WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues addressed
    • Control areas:
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered opportunity for American with Disabilities Act (ADA) inspections. Resulted in 8 inspections in 3 WDAs being completed;
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI. Resulted in 9 Job Centers in 4 WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, and specialized keyboards, etc.
    • All WDAs:
      • 49 Job Centers will have identical set up of new CPU, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology equipment.
  • Developing capacity to deliver awareness– and knowledge–building training to workforce staff, employers, and the public:
    • Piloted hybrid training that mixed live WebEx and in–person training. Presentations were recorded and will be available online through the Learning Center for Wisconsin public training and Cornerstone internal training platforms. Topics: Creating a Mentally Healthy Workplace (for employers) and Hmong Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity;
    • Developed a mental health stigma–reduction series of online training specifically for workforce development staff;
    • Developed a series of disability–related online training modules, currently in post–production preparation. Topics: Using the Assistive Technology on the JCW Computers, Disability Etiquette, How Disabilities Can Affect Job Seekers, Developing Cultural Competence, Learning Disabilities, Invisible Disabilities, Effective Communication with Job Seekers, and Employees with Disabilities. (Page 87)

Wisconsin’s participation in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) has well–positioned the state for continued physical and programmatic compliance. As a Round 2 DEI grant recipient, Wisconsin completed this 3–year, $2,330,000 demonstration project designed to determine if having additional human and capital resource supports improves the employment outcomes of job seekers with disabilities. Wisconsin received a 6–month extension beginning October 1, 2014, and concluded the grant on March 31, 2015. During the extension period, DEI focused on developing post–DEI capacity in job seeker accessibility and staff development within the Job Centers of Wisconsin. (Page 117)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

During the extension period, DEI focused on: 

  • Ensuring accessibility in all eleven Workforce Development Areas
    • Pilot areas:
      • WDA 11 and WDA 4 corrected additional ADA compliance issues addressed
    • Control areas:
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered opportunity for American with Disabilities Act (ADA) inspections. Resulted in 8 inspections in 3 WDAs being completed;
      • All 5 control WDAs were offered accessibility equipment the same as pilot areas received during DEI. Resulted in 9 Job Centers in 4 WDAs receiving adjustable workstations, large screen monitors, and specialized keyboards, etc.
    • All WDAs:
      • 49 Job Centers will have identical set up of new CPU, large screen monitor, and basic assistive technology equipment. 
  • Developing capacity to deliver awareness– and knowledge–building training to workforce staff, employers, and the public:
    • Piloted hybrid training that mixed live WebEx and in–person training. Presentations were recorded and will be available online through the Learning Center for Wisconsin public training and Cornerstone internal training platforms.

Topics: Creating a Mentally Healthy Workplace (for employers) and Hmong Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity;

  • Developed a mental health stigma–reduction series of online training specifically for workforce development staff;
  • Developed a series of disability–related online training modules, currently in post–production preparation.

Topics: Using the Assistive Technology on the JCW Computers, Disability Etiquette, How Disabilities Can Affect Job Seekers, Developing Cultural Competence, Learning Disabilities, Invisible Disabilities, Effective Communication with Job Seekers, and Employees with Disabilities. (Page 87)

Wisconsin is particularly interested in properly carrying out the financial literacy element. Under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant, staff training on asset development was created and delivered to WIA staff in the grant’s six pilot regions. The training included community-based asset development resources, relevant to the WDA that identified the resources. Although each local asset development guide focused on resources for job seekers with disabilities, many of the resources are also appropriate for individuals without disabilities.

Wisconsin’s DEI participation provided a solid start, and statewide creation and adoption of the guide is in progress. Web-based staff training will follow. The web-based training will focus on increasing awareness of what financial literacy is the impact of it on individuals at different stages of life, and how to find appropriate federal, state and local community-based services for job seekers. The training will be appropriate for and available to staff in WIOA Youth, Adult, and Dislocated Worker Programs as well as other partners. ( Page 117)

WRC Recommendation 7

We request updates on the PROMISE grant at our quarterly meetings to learn and share best practices on working with youth with disabilities. 

DSU Response:

DVR very much looks forward to sharing with the council the progress of all pilots and projects and steps taken by DVR to improve our services and outcomes. 

WRC Recommendation 8 (Page 172)

Most importantly, DVR has collaborated with the Board for People with Developmental Disabilities, the Department of Health Services, and the Department of Public Instruction on a pilot grant program designed to improve transition services by offering career and work experience while in high school. The “Let’s Get to Work” grant allowed a best practice to be developed between special education, DVR and long–term care providers to offer employment focused transition plans for developmental disabled students. The Promise Grant, where Wisconsin is one of six federal demonstration sites, further expands this collaboration and focus on youth.

DVR has a collaborative project with the Great Lakes Inter–Tribal Council as an Innovation and Expansion option. Three tribal entities are currently working with DVR to "Place and Train" Wisconsin DVR consumers in tribal businesses. (Page 172)

Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WDVR will pilot approaches, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports.

Supported Employment services will include use of the IPS Career Profile in lieu of extensive assessment services. For those individuals that have not been successful, Customized Employment services will be utilized including Discovery.

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development. (Page 189)

Use of systematic instruction principles will be piloted and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.

Supported Employment funds will be provided to youth with significant disabilities needing supported employment to utilize at least 10% of the budget required by WIOA. The remaining funds will be provided to adults with significant disabilities. It is expected that WDVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI VR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services. The WDVR case management system has the ability to identify cases and expend the funds allotted as required by RSA.

DVR will continue to work collaboratively with the Department of Health Services to increase statewide supported employment resources. Efforts will focus on increasing access to Supported Employment Services as well as Long Term Employment Supports, and financial coordination of these services. DVR has collaborative relationships with The Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse services that contract with counties and other entities for Mental Health services including Individual Placement and Support (via Medicaid waiver approved funds). (Page 190)

In Wisconsin, extended service funding is available through Managed Care and County funded mental health services. DVR is planning to pilot systematic instruction principles and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.

It is expected that WDVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI VR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services.

DVR has a policy in place for the coordination of IEP’s and IPE’s prior to graduation and prior to that when necessary. In the past, service and treatment plans with long–term care and mental health were coordinated and services identified and funding responsibilities determined. Due to the nature and scope of the changes expected in the long–term care system in Wisconsin, it is difficult to know how this will be accomplished but it is expected that treatment and service plans will continue to include and involve active collaboration with DVR. (Page 192)

DVR partnered with the Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI) to provide training for individuals with disabilities in a retail setting. This national program began its pilot in Milwaukee–area Walgreens retail locations in 2012 and is now a statewide initiative.

Building on the success of the REDI model, also called place and train, DVR offered the place and train model with other businesses and is currently working with businesses throughout Wisconsin to implement this model in their workplaces. 

Additionally, DVR has become the Point of Contact for Kwik Trip in all its Wisconsin convenience stores. DVR also works to meet the talent needs through our National Employment Team with employers such as Meijer, Wells Fargo, and Amazon. (Page 194)

Eligibility Pilot: Beginning in 2015, DVR contracted with the University of Wisconsin–Stout Vocational Rehabilitation Institute (SVRI) for an eligibility review process, authorizing SVRI to collect and make recommendations to appropriate DVR staff for eligibility and OOS determinations. This pilot is anticipated to free up to 15% of the counselor’s time to refocus on direct consumer employment plan activities. This pilot, therefore, anticipates that additional staff will be retained who experience "case burnout" from process activities. The data in Table 1 shows the number of permanent authorized FTEs by personnel category and the current vacancies in each category as of April 2014. However, we anticipate a vacancy rate of 5% during the 5 year projection period, (combination of past and current budget instructions). DVR anticipates maintaining adequate resources both in fiscal and staff resources to ensure a sustainable caseload. In December 2013, Act 58 provided funding for 9 additional VR Counselor positions. Table 1 Row Job Title Total positions Projected vacancies over the next 5 years 1 VR Counselor 196 10 2 Consumer Case Coordinator 69 3 3 Field Managers/Supervisors 25 1 4 Central Office Senior Leadership/ Managers 7 3 5 Central Office Staff Support 25 1 6 Total 322 18

DVR will continue to maintain an average employment plan caseload of 16,500, not to exceed 17,000, during FFY 2016–20. During the 5 year caseload projection period, the counselor caseload ratio should continue to comply with the DVR’s goal of not more than 100 consumers with active IPEs per counselor per month, recognizing that another 20–25% are individuals in applicant or plan development. ( Page 198)

Supported Employment funds will be provided to youth with significant disabilities needing supported employment to utilize at least 10% of the budgetary required by WIOA. The remaining funds will be provided to adults with significant disabilities. It is expected that WI DVR will supplement the funds provided in the supported employment grant by a multiple of five. Historically the WI DVR program has used case aids to provide supported employment services to DVR consumers with a typical annual expenditure of just less than $6.7 million in supported employment services. Use of systematic instruction principles will be piloted and if successful, will be incorporated into supports in Supported Employment. This strategy should assist in higher quality placements, a quicker and more successful transition to long–term supports, which should, in turn, address some capacity concerns in the long–term care system.  (Page 219)

Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports. ( Page 221)

  • Changes to Supported Employment services are necessary to meet the higher number of individuals to be served under WIOA, to include customized employment and to reduce the level and time necessary for extended services, and to insure the sustainability and viability of the long–term care system and DVR’s service provider network. The services available for supported employment and outcomes were analyzed and a number of internal and external stakeholder groups identified improvements. A workgroup of DVR staff and DHS staff reviewed the current technical specifications and identified improvements. In 2011, supported employment providers were asked to complete surveys and share information about how services are provided to consumers related to hours, travel, length and type of services.
  • Services will be streamlined and provide lasting value and outcomes to the individuals served. WI DVR will pilot approaches, such as systematic instruction, which will encourage rapid engagement, and improved support services encouraging natural supports, evidence based practices and a more rapid and sustainable transition to long term supports. (Page 226)

DVR entered into an agreement with the Department of Health Services to pilot a new comprehensive approach for the provision of supported employment to individuals with chronic and persistent mental illness called individual placement and support (IPS). The Wisconsin IPS system change grant partnership with Dartmouth College Community Mental Health Program provides funds for mental health care employment service expansion and technical assistance. As part of the 3–year initiative, DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population.  DVR counselors and job development and placement, providers will be trained in the new methodology that incorporates employment into mental health service delivery. If successful, this new methodology will be deployed statewide, expanding as counties have the resources to serve this population. (Page 236)

3) Develop and implement a plan to increase available supported employment resources. The DVR plan is to increase coordination with other funding sources such as Wisconsin’s county–based Family Care long term funding and services, and increase the number of supported employment providers in targeted areas of the state. The BPDD pilot “Let’s Get to Work” for transition students also holds great promise as a template for adult braided services and further collaboration with the state’s long–term care program. (Page 239)

The following table and narrative highlights the innovation and expansion activity supported by DVR funds in FFY15. Innovation and expansion activities are generally funded in accordance with DVR’s state fiscal year (i.e., July 1 – June 30) but may be conducted on a federal fiscal year if applicable. Contract / Agreement Start/End DVR funds Fiscal Arrangement and Type 8 local I and E projects with CIL’s 7/1/2010–6/30/13 $15,000 each location annually Each CIL worked with the local WDA Director to develop new patterns of services to be provided to DVR Consumers. Projects include: Assistive Technology work evaluation services, peer assisted job search instruction, financial literacy training and youth job groups. REDI Walgreen’s 4/1/12–6/30/13 $18,600 for site creation. Case service funds for direct consumer services. Intensive retail training with supports and competency based certification for potential hire with corporate partners. Let’s Get to Work 2/1/12–6/30/15 Case Service funds via Youth OJT DVR has committed and created a youth transition OJT to attach youth with disabilities to competitive employment prior to HS completion. Vocational Futures Planning Services 10/1/12 –9/30/15 Case Service funds Collaborative effort with long term care and other providers to provider individualized–based services, including case management services, to people with significant physical disabilities that are in need of long term care. Milwaukee Wrap Around Pilot 6/1/20132013 –9/30/ 2015 $350,500 annually Mentor program to establish resources and services to assist in employment. Innovation and Expansion—Place and Train Models. (Page 244)

DVR partnered with the Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI) to provide training for individuals with disabilities in a retail setting. This national program began its pilot in Milwaukee–area Walgreens retail locations in 2012 and is now a statewide initiative.

Building on the success of the REDI model, also called place and train, DVR offered the place and train model with other businesses and is currently working with businesses throughout Wisconsin to implement this model in their workplaces.

As required under section 101(a)(15)(E)(ii) of the Act, the Wisconsin Rehabilitation Council (WRC) and the DVR annually jointly prepare and submit to the RSA Commissioner a report on the activities and progress of the DVR in meeting its goals and priorities. This report is known as the annual Wisconsin Rehabilitation Council report. (Page 245)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

Wisconsin is particularly interested in properly carrying out the financial literacy element. Under the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant, staff training on asset development was created and delivered to WIA staff in the grant’s six pilot regions. The training included community-based asset development resources, relevant to the WDA that identified the resources. Although each local asset development guide focused on resources for job seekers with disabilities, many of the resources are also appropriate for individuals without disabilities. (Page 117)

  • information, services, assistance, assessments and job searching
  • computer and technology skill enhancement
  • resume development
  • interview skills
  • GED assistance
  • Educational opportunities
  • Short term training
  • Career assessments and exploration
  • Referrals to organizations for a variety of financial literacy information or services
  • Resource Room assistance
  • Computer access for job searching, writing and printing of resumes, online employment applications and assistance
  • Skill Explorer – the State skill matching system that links skill sets to current employment opportunities locally, regionally and statewide
  • Outreach – which can include meeting clients at itinerant locations, career and job fairs; local libraries
  1. Registering on Job Center of Wisconsin also provides the opportunity to receive e–blasts which provide information on Job Fairs, hiring events
  2. Claimants can utilize Skill Explorer which assists in matching skill sets to current job openings, including location and rates of pay (Page 128)

After the Division is assured that eligible individuals are adequately supported in their employment plan costs, and that Title I–B funds have been used to activate individuals with the most significant and significant disabilities from the OOS wait list in a timely manner, up to 2% of Title I–B case aids funds may be used for other allowable purposes, including innovation and expansion services. The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is currently focusing on programs that expand financial literacy, job development, youth services, and underserved tribal populations. Each program was created to address specific local needs in respective WDAs. Topics include: banking basics, car purchases, budgeting, understanding credit, employment barriers, online applications, social skills, temporary work experiences, self–advocacy, and obtaining gainful employment. Throughout the year, quarterly reports are due to DVR for review of progress and scope. It is anticipated for these services to transition from I&E funding to fee–for–service agreements upon successful effective completion. (Page 229)

Specialized Innovation and Expansion Projects In WDA 1, 5 and 8 there are financial literacy projects that established a program to help consumers better understand fraud, identity theft, savings, budgeting, and financial stability. The cost of the combined project: $40,686.

In WDA’s 5 and 6 there was a Project in partnership with the Division of Employment and Training provides comprehensive, individualized and value added services to DVR consumers. It adds optimizing opportunities to stay competitive in the inclusive marketplace. The cost of the project $148,218 (Page 243)

The following table and narrative highlights the innovation and expansion activity supported by DVR funds in FFY15. Innovation and expansion activities are generally funded in accordance with DVR’s state fiscal year (i.e., July 1 – June 30) but may be conducted on a federal fiscal year if applicable. Contract / Agreement Start/End DVR funds Fiscal Arrangement and Type 8 local I and E projects with CIL’s 7/1/2010–6/30/13 $15,000 each location annually Each CIL worked with the local WDA Director to develop new patterns of services to be provided to DVR Consumers. Projects include: Assistive Technology work evaluation services, peer assisted job search instruction, financial literacy training and youth job groups. REDI Walgreen’s 4/1/12–6/30/13 $18,600 for site creation. Case service funds for direct consumer services. Intensive retail training with supports and competency based certification for potential hire with corporate partners. Let’s Get to Work 2/1/12–6/30/15 Case Service funds via Youth OJT DVR has committed and created a youth transition OJT to attach youth with disabilities to competitive employment prior to HS completion. Vocational Futures Planning Services 10/1/12 –9/30/15 Case Service funds Collaborative effort with long term care and other providers to provider individualized–based services, including case management services, to people with significant physical disabilities that are in need of long term care. Milwaukee Wrap Around Pilot 6/1/20132013 –9/30/ 2015 $350,500 annually Mentor program to establish resources and services to assist in employment. Innovation and Expansion—Place and Train Models. (Page 244)

Benefits

Cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include: 

  • 1,637 Job Center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals external to the Job Centers;
  • 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks;
  • 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period;
  • 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 87)

The One–Stop system will ensure access to services or programs to English language learners (ELLs) by providing program information in alternate languages and formats through use of interpreters, translation, and other methods, as necessary and appropriate. Services to ELLs will be provided at the time and in a manner that avoids the imposition of an undue burden on or delay in receiving important benefits or services. As needed, clients in need of English Language Learning services will be will be connected with partner providers at a technical college or community based literacy organization.(Page 89)

If an entity other than the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation fails to provide or pay for comparable benefits or services for an eligible individual, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation shall provide or pay for such services to the individual.

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation will claim reimbursement for the services from the entity that failed to provide or pay for such services. Such entity shall reimburse the DVR pursuant to the terms of the interagency agreement or other mechanism described in this paragraph according to the procedures established in such agreement or mechanism.

Agency partners involved in the interagency agreements specifying the coordination of service procedures are described in this attachment. A DVR services coordination agreement may involve coordinated use of interagency funds. The service delivery timeframes within the Act and those referenced in the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Policy Manual shall establish the minimum standard for the timely delivery of vocational rehabilitation services. At its discretion, the Division may create additional requirements for the coordination and timely delivery of services when establishing mechanisms for interagency coordination that affect the delivery of services.( Page 177)

The Wisconsin DOC has awarded a Benefits Specialist Program to Legal Action of Wisconsin (LAW). The project, Disabled Offenders Economic Security (DOES) Project, will work with the 13 DOC institutions identified as having the highest number of inmates with serious mental illness and DD, to ensure that disabled offenders receive their benefits during the re– entry process, including employment and DVR referrals. (Page 178)

DVR employs an outcome based statewide fee structure with technical specifications for commonly used and available services. Statewide rates and technical specifications established for the services most commonly purchased from non–profit vocational rehabilitation service providers include: benefits analysis, internship/temporary work, job coaching, job preparation, development and placement, supported employment, vocational evaluation, and IPS supported employment, assistive technology assessment and services. Agencies wishing to provide these services sign a fee–for–service agreement with DVR. The statewide rates, technical specifications for services, service provider agreement and the providers that have a signed agreement with DVR are posted on the DVR public website. Other service agreements may be developed as required and appropriate. Agencies are must renew annual and sign service provider agreements for each new State Fiscal Year. (Page 187)

Business relationships similar to the IPS model (Systematic Job Development) will be used as a strategy in supported employment job development.

Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits.(Page 198- 190)

DVR has identified some sources of extended services. Students who receive Social Security benefits are eligible for extended services through the children’s waiver in Wisconsin. Other sources for students and youth may be county mental health funds for continued support in supported employment and IPS supported employment. DVR intends to explore all options for funds outside of DVR but will utilize general case service funds as well as funds available under 362.20 for youth and students who need support after job placement and prior to the availability of funding from sources of long–term support. (Page 191)

  • Long–term support for people who do not qualify for these supports based on IQ – for example, people diagnosed with autism or mental illness.
  • Improved job coaching so that coaching can fade in a reasonable and timely way.
  • Development of a mentor system for work place role models
  • Ability to address basic needs before or during rehabilitation e.g. food shelter, basic medical care.
  • Improved use of appropriate work skills evaluation tools
  • Support of business community for developing a work environment friendly to individuals with disabilities, e.g. need for part time employment, preservation of benefits, flexibility, volunteer work.
  • Support of wrap around services not just on the job, e.g. transportation.
  • Need to change the long term support system to a managed care approach to retain and expand funding for long–term supported employment services
  • Need to orient the long term care system toward a “money follows the person” approach
  • Development of natural supports, in lieu of funded long–term extended services
  • Expansion of peer support specialists for individuals with mental illness.
  • Informational services regarding various options and programs for families.
  • More and better targeted career information to address the attitude that there are no jobs that persons with disabilities can do
  • Increased need for soft skill preparation to expand employment opportunities
  • Increased education for business community re: the business benefits of hiring our consumers
  • Expanded work incentives and increased access to benefits advisement
  • Need for expanded work incentive demonstrations to more fully address the number of consumers experiencing disincentive to full employment (e.g., SSDI $2/$1 benefit offset and “Making Work Pay” cost–share demonstration)
  • DVR Administrator to continue to provide quarterly updates on the wait list numbers to the Council as recommended. (Page 210) 

Programmatic Goal 4: Provide targeted counseling to consumers dependent on public benefits that provide enriched information of the benefits of work. Use of Benefits Analysis services will be encouraged for all consumers in Supported Employment receiving benefits in order to address hesitations and foster economic independence and economic self–sufficiency. Youth will be encouraged to explore paid work options prior to an application for benefits.

Programmatic Goal 5: DVR will meet and exceed the expenditure requirement under WOIA requiring at least 50% of supported employment funds on youth with significant disabilities.  (Page 219)

The DVR continues to utilize technical specifications and fee schedules in the provision of services provided by Community Rehabilitation Programs including: job development, supported employment, job coaching, benefits analysis, and vocational evaluation. In addition, the DVR conducts regular meetings with vendors of these services for feedback, clarification and ongoing compliance and improvement of services.

DVR will continue to provide an OJT affirmative hiring initiative to assist employers with the initial cost of training a hired DVR job seeker. DVR area managers train CRP job–placement staff on the use of the OJT initiative. CRP job placement staff is encouraged to use the OJT initiative when they speak to employers about hiring DVR job seekers. (Page 233)

At the service delivery level, in the State of Wisconsin the TAA program integrates our employment and training program activities in coordination with other workforce entities such as WIOA Dislocated Worker Program, Veterans Program, Technical Colleges; within the established One–Stop Job Center (workforce development) delivery system. TAA staff maintains communication to all partners in the Job Center by attending staff meetings & Rapid Response sessions, and have an active role with key functions within the Job Center. By attending Job Center staff meetings, partners are provided updates on TAA legislation, new petition filings and certifications, and upcoming Trade Intake events happening in their WDA. Local Job Service TAA staff will be present at all Trade Intake sessions. In addition, partner entities (WIOA, Veteran, Technical Colleges, etc.) will be invited to participate in the Intake in order to increase the likelihood of co–enrollment or dual–enrollment, and dates and times are coordinated as meeting arrangements are being made. WIOA will maintain a working knowledge of TAA benefits and services in order to provide these services to co–enrolled participants through WIOA case management. (Page 261)

All newly hired LVER or DVOP staff will complete on–line distance learning regarding veteran’s benefits. This training is provided by NVTI Training Solutions, a DOLVETS sponsored training provider. All FTE staff will be required to attend Facilitating Veteran Employment training offered by NVTI. In addition, LVER will receive training on employer outreach. DVOPs will receive training on Facilitating Veteran Employment and Intensive Services. All LVER or DVOP training will be provided within 18 months of hire. Staff will receive instructions on all data entry from DWD/OVS supervisor. Specific Webinar necessary training will be provided to LVER and DVOP staff by DWD. All DWD/OVS will receive additional training requested by staff or DWD management through Cornerstone. (Page 275)

School to Work Transition

DVR staff attends Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings, with consent from the student and family. DVR is also available to provide information and technical assistance on transition services to teachers, parents, and other organizations and councils.

As outlined in the TAG and the DVR Policy the development of the plan for employment for students who are eligible for plan development, is to occur prior to the student leaving school. DVR staff and educators are encouraged to coordinate the provision of services and transition activities for students who are eligible for both IEP and an IPE services to assist them in transitioning from school to work.

The DVR Statewide Transition Action and Resource Team (START), supported by the interagency agreement, have the role to improve consistency and engagement in the transition process. The DVR START team and the DPI Wisconsin Transition Improvement Grant (TIG) also collaborate to improve consistency in the provision of service to youth with disabilities as they transition from school to post high school activities that include VR services. TIG provides technical assistance to school districts, Cooperative Educational School Districts (CESA) and county Transition Advisory Councils, including, information dissemination and participation in staff development activities. The Interagency Agreement also supports TIG. DVR START and TIG also collaborate to provide training regarding the Interagency Agreement. (Page 185)

  • DVR conducts regular collaborative meetings and activity with sources of long term support including managed care organizations, self–directed managed care and county programs to facilitate referrals, service coordination and increase outcomes.
  • DVR is a strong partner in the Board for People with Developmental Disabilities and their “Let’s Get to Work” pilot to strengthen career and job attachments for high school transition students. Outcome goals include:
    • Changes in policy that increase community employment for youth with I/DD
    • Increases in integrated, community employment rates of youth with I/DD o Changes in stakeholder attitudes about the employability of youth with I/DD
  • The federally funded PROMISE grant and Let’s Get to Work are comprised of 4 main areas: 
  1. Consortium of 70 key stakeholders who identify policy issues and includes a youth track,
  2. A policy team that takes the work of the Consortium and strategizes way to implement policy changes,
  3. 9 school pilot sites implementing evidence based practices and identifying barriers to employment, and
  4. Coaches who provide intense, on–site technical assistance to the school sites. (Page 226)
Data Collection

No specific disability related information found.

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Business services professionals representing various programs and services serve on a local Business services Team, and use a shared business relationship (account) management system in order to effectively communicative activities with businesses in real-time. DVR is represented on local business service teams primarily through its business service consultants. Business Services professionals participate in collaborative training with other partners.

DVR participated in planning and attending the annual Collaborate conference which brings business services professionals and business together to discuss needs, opportunities, successes and best practices.

Additionally, state agencies began convening in PY15 at the direction of Governor Walker to create a one-stop portal for businesses to ensure that all employers, including small businesses, can learn about available services and programs. While this project is in early stages, it has the potential to be invaluable to helping businesses find talent. (Page 52)

Career Pathways

Guidance and support will be provided statewide at the agency level by the Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee. Financial resources will be provided, in part, through the TAACCCT Exceeding the Cap project, funded by DOL and called Advancing Careers of TAA and Transitions or ACT2. The Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee includes representation from the WTCS, DWD, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI), the Wisconsin Workforce Development Association (WWDA), and the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC). The active participation of the partners of the Wisconsin Career Pathways Committee ensures that career pathways in Wisconsin are industry-driven and support students and job seekers of all ages, backgrounds, and abilities. (Page 33)

WIOA requirements of service provider report cards will be made possible through data sharing. Partners will gather and analyze data, synthesize it into reports, share findings with other partners, and facilitate discussions for improvements. Once data sharing capabilities are established, partners will make the report cards easily accessible to job seekers, WIOA core partners, and the public. Each partner will ensure that its own staff is kept trained on how to access and use the report cards. All core partners’ services, including Career Pathways and ABE/High School Equivalency Diploma, will be part of the service provider report card offerings. (Page 35)

The State is a recognized national leader in career pathways beginning in Basic Skills, moving through post-secondary coursework (concurrently in early courses) and resulting in post-secondary credential attainment. Over 52% of students who enter the system through ABE/ELL enroll in post-secondary coursework in the same or following academic year.

Career Pathways offer an efficient and customer-centered approach to training and education by successfully articulating the appropriate secondary, ABE, postsecondary education and training, career and academic advising and supportive services to enter and progress in a career.

Career Pathway; a series of connected education and training strategies and support services that enable individuals to secure industry relevant certification and obtain employment within an occupational area and to advance to higher levels of future education and employment in that area.

Registered Apprenticeship Access to Postsecondary Credentials is improved with the increased collaboration through the WTCS and Career Pathways…etc.

In addition, this access is strengthened with the increased partnership with apprenticeship in several areas.  (Page 55)

  • Research-based activities such as the STAR reading program (Wisconsin has trained 186 ABE teachers in the STAR approach, and this group has an active web-based learning community)
  • Adult Numeracy Initiative training
  • Preparing to Achieve training
  • Contextualizing the GED training (WTCS-developed)
  • Extensive Career Pathway and Career Pathway Bridge training for both ABE and ELL (The WTCS has hundreds of career pathways identified, and many of these have integrated ABE/occupational Career Pathway Bridges attached)
  • Training in connecting as many partners as possible into our career pathways approach (through Wisconsin’s Moving Pathways Forward initiative).
  • Training in the use of the CCRS-aligned WTCS ABE curriculum standards (required of all grantees) (Page 161)
Employment Networks

Cumulative numbers for the DEI grant implementation include: 

  • 1,637 Job Center and community partner staff training contacts conducted, with 449 of them reported as being for individuals external to the Job Centers;
  • 81 individuals being served in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work (TTW) program. Two of the pilot WDBs continue to provide the service through their own robust Employment Networks;
  • 643 employer training contacts were made, with 301 of them occurring in the extension period;
  • 781 referrals for or provision of asset development services. Formal, full benefits analysis reports account for 344 of those services. (Page 87)
  • DVR will continue to promote the “Partnership Plus” opportunities in the Ticket to Work (TTW) program. DVR will share information with eligible Ticket holders on post–VR services and supports available through assignment of their Ticket to an approved employment network provider.  (Page 227)

Policies and Initiatives

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Wisconsin Employment First Grant Recipients - 09/22/2017

“The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities awarded Employment First Partner grants to 14 community organizations, including: schools, employment providers, managed care organizations, and advocacy organizations.  These organizations will work in their local communities to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Activities will include:  legislative breakfasts, Take Your Legislator to Work visits, business recognition events; leadership mentoring, media campaigns, public service announcements, commercials, community conversations, presentations to local civic groups (e.g., chambers, Rotary clubs) and employer groups, business tours, and business to business mentoring.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 08/01/2017

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

WI Project SEARCH - 07/01/2017

“Project SEARCH is a business led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration. A 9-12 month program, Project SEARCH provides total immersion in a large community business. Students with disabilities are offered a workforce alternative for their last year of high school. All participants must be eligible for services with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). At some sites, young adults who have completed high school may be eligible to participate in Project SEARCH.

The Project SEARCH partnership includes a local high status business, a school, DVR, a vocational services agency and a disability services agency, such as a managed care organization. The business provides an on-site training classroom, business liaison and rotational internships for on the job training. The school provides an instructor. DVR works with a local vocational services agency to supply job coaches who support students in their internships as needed and assist with final job placement. The disability services agency provides follow along services for any eligible student who is hired at the business site or in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 04/05/2017

“This year’s conference title is Embracing Change: Together We Make It Happen. The conference focuses on the changes happening at the state and federal level and how these changes will significantly increase integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. …

Change provides both opportunities and challenges. This conference brings together individuals with disabilities, family members, state vocational rehabilitation counselors, employment providers, policy makers, and educators to learn and share creative ways to address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Department of Health Services Guiding Principles for Competitive Integrated Employment for People with Disabilities in Long-term Care - 04/01/2017

“The Department of Health Services (DHS) has established a list of Guiding Principles that build on the value of full inclusion of people with disabilities served in our long-term care programs. These principles are evidence-based practices that align with our vision for the future for people with disabilities in our communities. We recognize that each person’s path toward competitive integrated employment involves a person-centered planning process that includes a variety of experiences to build toward successful jobs.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 02/17/2017

“Supported employment services are provided in a working alliance with many partners. Communication is the key to success between these partners. Use of issued agency guidance, technical assistance guides, and policies and regulations is encouraged to build collaboration.

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 10/01/2016

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 02/15/2016

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR in 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Supported Employment Fees/Customized Employment - 10/01/2015

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development chart of supported employment and customized employment fees.   It details the Supported Employment Service, and the fee for each service.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Wisconsin Assembly Bill 731 - 03/31/2016

This bill makes changes to the laws in this state related to the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014. Under federal law, an eligible resident of this state may participate in a qualified ABLE program of another state and establish an ABLE account. The proceeds of an ABLE account may be used to pay for qualified expenses, such as education, housing, and transportation costs, for a beneficiary who is an individual with disabilities, as defined under federal law.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

WI Statutes: Vocational Rehabilitation; Specialized Programs for Persons with Disabilities - 08/26/2015

This WI statute defines persons with disabilities and explains Vocational Rehabilitation and “special programs for persons with disabilities.” It states that the State will, “Make vocational rehabilitation services under this chapter available in every county to all persons with disabilities who are present in the state, regardless of residency,” and details the services that will be available to people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Wisconsin SB 21 (Act 55) - 07/12/2015

"Senate Bill 21 as 2015 Wisconsin Act 55 is approved and deposited in the office of the Secretary of State...The following is a brief summary of how this budget, including my vetoes, will continue to make Wisconsin more prosperous, more independent and more efficient...Newly establishes Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) accounts to empower the disabled community and their families to achieve greater independence and assist with various expenses."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Wisconsin Fair Employment Act

Wisconsin's Fair Employment Law gives civil rights protections to qualified persons with disabilities. The law applies to virtually all, private and public employers, regardless of the number of employees. Under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), disability discrimination is also prohibited for employers having 15 or more employees. Both laws are designed to ensure equal opportunity in all aspects of employment.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

WI Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 08/01/2017

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin Department of Health Services Guiding Principles for Competitive Integrated Employment for People with Disabilities in Long-term Care - 04/01/2017

“The Department of Health Services (DHS) has established a list of Guiding Principles that build on the value of full inclusion of people with disabilities served in our long-term care programs. These principles are evidence-based practices that align with our vision for the future for people with disabilities in our communities. We recognize that each person’s path toward competitive integrated employment involves a person-centered planning process that includes a variety of experiences to build toward successful jobs.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Specifications: Supported Employment - 02/17/2017

“Supported employment services are provided in a working alliance with many partners. Communication is the key to success between these partners. Use of issued agency guidance, technical assistance guides, and policies and regulations is encouraged to build collaboration.

DVR can provide up to 24 months of support, although this level of need is rare. DVR can provide up to 48 months of support for youth (age 14-24). The services and processes outlined in the technical specifications have been designed to insure a good job match and reduce the need for support while maximizing consumer independence.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • WIOA

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation Existing Business Policy - 10/01/2016

“This policy is to be used to help DVR staff work with consumers whose goal is to maintain their existing business. Through this Existing Business Policy DVR can assist existing business owners with additional costs that are due to disability related factors and associated with operating their business.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Wisconsin DVR Statewide Service Fee Schedule - 02/15/2016

All services must comply with the technical specifications outlined for each service or payment will not be made. A revised report must be submitted to DVR in 10 business days if returned for non-compliance. No additional fees will be paid for requested meetings.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development

Supported Employment Fees/Customized Employment - 10/01/2015

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development chart of supported employment and customized employment fees.   It details the Supported Employment Service, and the fee for each service.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Transition Action Guide For Post-secondary Planning - 03/01/2015

This Transition Action Guide (TAG) was developed to support the 2007 Interagency Agreement among the Department of Workforce Development (DWD), the Department of Public Instruction (DPI), and the Department of Health Services (DHS). This guide suggests best practices and resources to assist key stakeholders (students, parents/guardians, teachers and school team members, DVR counselors, Children and Adult Long –Term Care and Mental Health professionals, and ADRC representatives) involved in the transition process. This tool can be used as a framework to improve communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

A Better Bottom Line: Governor Scott Walker Delivers Remarks at Wisconsin Employment First Conference - 04/03/2014

“Governor Walker proclaimed 2014 as the Year of A Better Bottom Line to encourage and promote employment opportunities for people with disabilities... During the Year of A Better Bottom Line, Governor Walker is directing state agencies to focus on recognizing and promoting public and private programs, companies, and organizations that are improving employment opportunities for people with disabilities, including veterans and students.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Priorities for People with Disabilities in Wisconsin

“This packet provides information and recommendations on various issues that people with disabilities face, including integrated employment, access to health care and schools, and special education funding.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Wisconsin Individual Placement and Support

IPS is an evidenced based practice model of supported employment for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. In Wisconsin the Department of Workforce Development, DVR has partnered with the Department of Health Services - Division of Mental Health to establish IPS in Wisconsin as part of a grant from Dartmouth College and Johnson and Johnson. Mental health services in Wisconsin are provided by each county. The IPS model involves a team approach involving an Employment Specialist and a DVR counselor becoming a part of a mental health treatment team, with employment becoming a focus of mental health services. Adherence to the prescribed national model is essential. Fidelity reviews are conducted until good fidelity is achieved. Technical assistance is provided as part of the grant and can be provided for counties wishing to implement IPS. Legislation has been proposed (2014) for a significant expansion of IPS availability in Wisconsin.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation: “Employment First Team” - 03/01/2015

Lists team members and headquarters as of March 2015.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Transition Interagency Agreement - 12/02/2010

This interagency agreement has been revised from the July 2007 interagency agreement to now focus on both students with disabilities transitioning from high school as well as adults with disabilities, who have an expectation for integrated competitive employment. It has also been elaborated for clarity and to reflect best practices associated with increasing employment opportunities for people with cognitive and/or physical disabilities who also have challenges with mental health. Based on recommendations made by a statewide employment task force, this agreement represents the intent to fully coordinate all of the activities and programs within each agency, for every internal and external stakeholder who is striving to achieve employment for citizens with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Interagency Agreement MOU: Adults and Transitioning Youth - 12/02/2010

“This agreement between DPI, DVR, and DHS has four overall priorities supporting integrated employment: To comply with federal legal mandates under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA). To provide practical guidance, technical assistance, and training to internal and external stakeholders and staff regarding employment-related services and supports. To provide information on employment services to individuals with disabilities and their family members or guardians so they will be able to participate fully in employment. To provide clarification of roles of stakeholders within each respective department regarding individuals with disabilities who have identified support needs associated with employment and independent living, so that individuals and their families may regard such efforts to be as seamless, non-duplicative, and as transparent as possible.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for the Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program - 11/10/2009

“The purpose of this MOU is for the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) and the Department of Children and Families, Division of Family and Economic Security, Wisconsin Works (W-2) Program to establish collaborative efforts regarding their services and to develop a common understanding regarding their roles, policies, and procedures to better serve individuals with disabilities who may benefit from services from both programs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Department of Health Services’ Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF): Final Report - 07/18/2008

“Against this backdrop, the Managed Care and Employment Task Force (MCETF) was convened in May 2007 by Division of Long-Term Care Administrator Sinikka Santala and charged with recommending a comprehensive strategy to expand work options for adults who rely on the community-based, long-term care system. The Task Force, composed of 28 members representing a wide range of interests and expertise, analyzed the challenges and identified best practices from Wisconsin and elsewhere for overcoming these challenges.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor’s Committee for people with disability Work plan

The Governor’s Committee for People with Disabilities: • Advises the Governor and state agencies on problems faced by people with disabilities, • Reviews legislation and advises the Governor about legislation affecting people with disabilities, • Suggests to the Governor and state agencies ways to enhance the effective operations of publicity and privately administered or supported programs serving people with disabilities, • Promotes the goal of self-sufficiency for people with disabilities, • Promotes the collection, dissemination and incorporation of adequate information about persons with disabilities into public planning at all levels of government, • Promotes public awareness of needs and abilities of people with disabilities, and • Encourages the effective involvement of people with disabilities in government.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other

Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities

“Transition is helping students with disabilities and their families think about their life after high school and identify long-range goals designing the high school experience to ensure that students gain the skills and connections they need to achieve these goals the provision of funds and services to local school districts to assist in the transition process.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Survival Coalition of Wisconsin Disability Organizations

“The intention of the Wisconsin Employment First Coalition is to partner with people with disabilities, other stakeholders, businesses and the public to increase awareness of the need to provide integrated employment opportunities here in Wisconsin. Survival Coalition supports integrated employment as the presumed outcome for people with disabilities. They believe that everyone can and should work in integrated jobs.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Wisconsin Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

Wisconsin has an APSE chapter.  “WI APSE believes that a state-wide Employment First effort is a vital component to the goal of increasing employment outcomes for citizens with disabilities in a manner that promotes equality of opportunity…Between May and September 2009, WI APSE facilitated group discussions about employment opportunities in eight locations around the state.” This document is a compilation of their observations, suggestions and next steps to implementing Employment First in Wisconsin.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Employment First Community Action Team’s (CATs)

The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities and National APSE  teamed up to fund the technical assistance and training of three to five pilot “Employment First” Community Action Teams (CATs) sites round the state. “The purpose of the CATs is to implement practices around the state aligned with the Employment First Initiative to support an increased number of people with disabilities in Wisconsin to work in their communities. CATs will take the lead in implementing action plan items at a local level, setting local benchmarks, and reporting on progress.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Wisconsin Employment First Grant Recipients - 09/22/2017

“The Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities awarded Employment First Partner grants to 14 community organizations, including: schools, employment providers, managed care organizations, and advocacy organizations.  These organizations will work in their local communities to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Activities will include:  legislative breakfasts, Take Your Legislator to Work visits, business recognition events; leadership mentoring, media campaigns, public service announcements, commercials, community conversations, presentations to local civic groups (e.g., chambers, Rotary clubs) and employer groups, business tours, and business to business mentoring.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

WI Project SEARCH - 07/01/2017

“Project SEARCH is a business led collaboration that enables young adults with disabilities to gain and maintain employment through training and career exploration. A 9-12 month program, Project SEARCH provides total immersion in a large community business. Students with disabilities are offered a workforce alternative for their last year of high school. All participants must be eligible for services with the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). At some sites, young adults who have completed high school may be eligible to participate in Project SEARCH.

The Project SEARCH partnership includes a local high status business, a school, DVR, a vocational services agency and a disability services agency, such as a managed care organization. The business provides an on-site training classroom, business liaison and rotational internships for on the job training. The school provides an instructor. DVR works with a local vocational services agency to supply job coaches who support students in their internships as needed and assist with final job placement. The disability services agency provides follow along services for any eligible student who is hired at the business site or in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WI Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2011

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project." Wisconsin received a grant to support their Rural Supported Employment and Peer Support Programs.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health